A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » Regional Cycling » Australia
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Southern cross drive accident



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old April 2nd 14, 12:48 AM posted to aus.bicycle
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,588
Default Southern cross drive accident

On 22/03/14 06:32, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
In aus.bicycle on Fri, 21 Mar 2014 21:08:03 +1000
Stuart Longland wrote:
So ringing a bell was perfectly adequate. One only ever used the
handlebars for hanging on or steering -- to operate the brake you
backpedalled. That meant you had a hand free to muck around with a
woefully inadequate bell. The lack of distractions meant there was a
good chance the pedestrian concerned would hear you and react.


If you can't manage to brake and bell at the same time, then you are
riding a bike you can't manage.


I dare you to panic brake at the limit of traction and operate the bell
while the back wheel is hovering in the air.

My "or similar warning device" is hands free, volume and intent self
modifying dependent on the circumstance, and has been used to stop
motorists on numerous occasions. It's called "voice".

--
JS
Ads
  #22  
Old April 2nd 14, 12:53 AM posted to aus.bicycle
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,588
Default Southern cross drive accident

On 24/03/14 11:43, Trent W. Buck wrote:
Stuart Longland writes:

40kg of bicycle + 90kg of rider doesn't stop *that* quickly.


Wow, and I thought my steel bike was heavy at 22kg.

So ringing a bell was perfectly adequate. One only ever used the
handlebars for hanging on or steering -- to operate the brake you
backpedalled. That meant you had a hand free to muck around with a


Which is why I have backpedal brakes.

It also helps for signalling -- something I used to be ****ed off at the
lycra brigade for never doing, until I realized that if they tried to
signal their turns, they'd probably fall off.

Also makes it much easier to get pizzas back home,
since they don't like going sideways into the panniers.


I rode up the Warburton Hwy for a few km the other weekend, and I am
sure if I stuck my right arm out to indicate I wanted to turn right,
there was a good chance I'd lose it.

Yeah, I signal to move right whenever there's someone who needs to see
it, and my lycra fits well, thanks.

--
JS
  #23  
Old April 2nd 14, 01:25 AM posted to aus.bicycle
Trent W. Buck
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Southern cross drive accident

James writes:

Riding on the road in Melbourne on my "racing" bike, I get maybe one
puncture per year, but I avoid wet weather riding when possible, as this
is the most dangerous condition and leads to most punctures.


OOC, how does wet weather make punctures more likely?
  #24  
Old April 2nd 14, 01:50 AM posted to aus.bicycle
Zebee Johnstone
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,949
Default Southern cross drive accident

In aus.bicycle on Wed, 02 Apr 2014 10:48:42 +1100
James wrote:
On 22/03/14 06:32, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
In aus.bicycle on Fri, 21 Mar 2014 21:08:03 +1000
Stuart Longland wrote:
So ringing a bell was perfectly adequate. One only ever used the
handlebars for hanging on or steering -- to operate the brake you
backpedalled. That meant you had a hand free to muck around with a
woefully inadequate bell. The lack of distractions meant there was a
good chance the pedestrian concerned would hear you and react.


If you can't manage to brake and bell at the same time, then you are
riding a bike you can't manage.


I dare you to panic brake at the limit of traction and operate the bell
while the back wheel is hovering in the air.


I have absolutely no idea why you wouldbe doing that on a shared path.

Because any sensible person rides to conditions and if you can't see a
ped in time to slow and ride properly on a shared path you shouldn't
be on the path.

If you want to ride at a speed where a panic brake of that level is
something you need to do, then a shared path isn't the place for it.

I do about 25km/h on clear shared paths, but if I can't see what's
coming I slow, if there's a possible hazard I slow and if I want to go
much faster than that then a shared path is not the place.

Zebee
  #25  
Old April 2nd 14, 02:41 AM posted to aus.bicycle
news13
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Southern cross drive accident

On Wed, 02 Apr 2014 11:25:13 +1100, Trent W. Buck wrote:

James writes:

Riding on the road in Melbourne on my "racing" bike, I get maybe one
puncture per year, but I avoid wet weather riding when possible, as
this is the most dangerous condition and leads to most punctures.


OOC, how does wet weather make punctures more likely?


It might be explainable by water+foreign object means it is more mobile
and gets flunk onto roadside by traffic, or every time it rains the gunk
in the lanes gets washed to the side where bicyclist ride, or puncture
repair in the wet is so miserable that you remember it longer than a
repair in the dry and thus seems to happen more often.

  #26  
Old April 2nd 14, 02:46 AM posted to aus.bicycle
news13
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Southern cross drive accident

On Wed, 02 Apr 2014 10:44:19 +1100, James wrote:


And because a bike/ped collision is safer for everyone than a bike/car
collision, and (situation dependent) less likely besides.


Though I've bounced off a few cars over the last 25+years of riding,
I've only ever damaged myself landing on the road.

I know of several folks who have been seriously injured while riding on
bicycle tracks, including a fatality.

I don't think bike paths are as safe as you believe.


Especially if they are not maintained. Neighbour came a cropper on a sand
patch on the M7 bikepath. It wasn't the sand that was the problem, but
the steel motor vehicle strength guard rails that were the problem. Years
convelessing and he'll never get back to "normal".

Caveat his regular pack training ride.

  #27  
Old April 2nd 14, 04:18 AM posted to aus.bicycle
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,588
Default Southern cross drive accident

On 02/04/14 11:25, Trent W. Buck wrote:
James writes:

Riding on the road in Melbourne on my "racing" bike, I get maybe one
puncture per year, but I avoid wet weather riding when possible, as this
is the most dangerous condition and leads to most punctures.


OOC, how does wet weather make punctures more likely?


Water makes glass and stone flints stick to the tyre, and lubricates the
cutting action.

--
JS
  #28  
Old April 2nd 14, 04:22 AM posted to aus.bicycle
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,588
Default Southern cross drive accident

On 02/04/14 11:50, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
In aus.bicycle on Wed, 02 Apr 2014 10:48:42 +1100
James wrote:
On 22/03/14 06:32, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
In aus.bicycle on Fri, 21 Mar 2014 21:08:03 +1000
Stuart Longland wrote:
So ringing a bell was perfectly adequate. One only ever used the
handlebars for hanging on or steering -- to operate the brake you
backpedalled. That meant you had a hand free to muck around with a
woefully inadequate bell. The lack of distractions meant there was a
good chance the pedestrian concerned would hear you and react.

If you can't manage to brake and bell at the same time, then you are
riding a bike you can't manage.


I dare you to panic brake at the limit of traction and operate the bell
while the back wheel is hovering in the air.


I have absolutely no idea why you wouldbe doing that on a shared path.


You absolutely made no mention of a condition of a bells usefulness only
being on a shared path.

--
JS
  #29  
Old April 2nd 14, 04:31 AM posted to aus.bicycle
Tomasso[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Southern cross drive accident


"Trent W. Buck" wrote in message ...
James writes:

Riding on the road in Melbourne on my "racing" bike, I get maybe one
puncture per year, but I avoid wet weather riding when possible, as this
is the most dangerous condition and leads to most punctures.


OOC, how does wet weather make punctures more likely?


1. Road gunk includes some slivers of glass. Wet tyres keep this stuff on the wheels longer than dry.

2. Wetness lubricates the rubber. Easier for glass slivers to cut through.

Tom.
  #30  
Old April 2nd 14, 09:16 PM posted to aus.bicycle
John Henderson[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Southern cross drive accident

Trent W. Buck wrote:

OOC, how does wet weather make punctures more likely?


As Jobst Brandt once wrote: Try cutting dry rubber with a sharp blade.
Compare that with cutting wet rubber.

John

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Great Southern Cross Tom Kunich Racing 4 December 7th 09 01:44 AM
Court hearing: Southern Cross Drive road rage incident from May8 Kim Ryan Australia 4 August 8th 08 05:52 AM
installing an old speedo cable drive on a rear wheel for prop drive meb[_94_] Techniques 0 April 22nd 08 01:24 PM
installing an old speedo cable drive on a rear wheel for prop drive meb[_92_] Techniques 1 April 20th 08 11:48 AM
Incident on Southern Cross Drive [SYD} This Morning Beanzy Australia 0 October 29th 06 01:03 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.