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MTB disc brake caused wild fire



 
 
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  #21  
Old March 29th 18, 08:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 289
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 6:24:34 PM UTC+2, sms wrote:
On 3/27/2018 7:39 AM, Joerg wrote:

Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then they
require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy business. On
mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for them. Cable disc
brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for heavy duty MTB riding.


Avoid hydraulic disc brakes at all costs. Stick to mechanical disc brakes.


Well argued! I assume it is based on own experience.

Lou
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  #22  
Old March 29th 18, 08:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 289
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Once a year? Why?

Lou
  #23  
Old March 29th 18, 08:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,607
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 2018-03-29 12:25, wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Once a year? Why?


Because after about a year the lever for the rear brake starts feeling
soft. Braking is still fine and most other riders just leave it like
that but I like the pressure point nice and hard. Also, the slightest
amount of air in the line near the caliper can cause a brake failure on
a long downhill which here in the hills is not cool.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #24  
Old March 29th 18, 10:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 9:47:20 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-29 12:25, wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Once a year? Why?


Because after about a year the lever for the rear brake starts feeling
soft. Braking is still fine and most other riders just leave it like
that but I like the pressure point nice and hard. Also, the slightest
amount of air in the line near the caliper can cause a brake failure on
a long downhill which here in the hills is not cool.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Never bleed my brakes on my cross bike for 4 years now and they feel like they did on day 1. Shimano must be doing something right.

Lou
  #25  
Old March 29th 18, 10:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,835
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 3/29/2018 4:19 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 9:47:20 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-29 12:25,
wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.



Once a year? Why?


Because after about a year the lever for the rear brake starts feeling
soft. Braking is still fine and most other riders just leave it like
that but I like the pressure point nice and hard. Also, the slightest
amount of air in the line near the caliper can cause a brake failure on
a long downhill which here in the hills is not cool.


Never bleed my brakes on my cross bike for 4 years now and they feel like they did on day 1. Shimano must be doing something right.


Says the guy riding in Nederlands where there are no
mountain lions. Of course they work for you.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #26  
Old March 29th 18, 10:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
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Posts: 143
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

sms wrote:
On 3/27/2018 7:39 AM, Joerg wrote:

Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then they
require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy business. On
mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for them. Cable disc
brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for heavy duty MTB riding.


Avoid hydraulic disc brakes at all costs. Stick to mechanical disc brakes.



Which require constant adjustments as the pads wear, have cables that
weather eats, etc.

All my bikes have disks the CX/gravel/adventure road? Is cable the others
are hydraulic.

The cable is a lot more fuss, the Hydros just work, once set up you feed
them pads which is very easy.

Personally as someone who rides off-road plus high (ish) miles commuting
disks and preferably Hydro are game changers in terms of performance and
maintenance.

In terms of stuff like power, there is quite a overlap between the two, my
gravel bikes cable disks is about as powerful as the old commute MTB with
its older and cheaper Hydro brakes, both are embarrassing weak compared to
my Full suspension MTB.

Roger Merriman

  #27  
Old March 30th 18, 12:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 2018-03-29 14:32, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/29/2018 4:19 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 9:47:20 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-29 12:25,
wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for
your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with
the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs
to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.



Once a year? Why?


Because after about a year the lever for the rear brake starts feeling
soft. Braking is still fine and most other riders just leave it like
that but I like the pressure point nice and hard. Also, the slightest
amount of air in the line near the caliper can cause a brake failure on
a long downhill which here in the hills is not cool.


Never bleed my brakes on my cross bike for 4 years now and they feel
like they did on day 1. Shimano must be doing something right.


Says the guy riding in Nederlands where there are no mountain lions. Of
course they work for you.


There are also no hills and dirt and stuff, or having to ride through
rivers. My MTB brake calipers regularly reach a state where you can't
even seem them anymore.

The guys using Shimano out here need to bleed them as well, except they
can't use the DOT4 fluid from the garage cabinet.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #28  
Old March 30th 18, 12:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 2018-03-29 14:34, Roger Merriman wrote:
sms wrote:
On 3/27/2018 7:39 AM, Joerg wrote:

Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then they
require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy business. On
mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for them. Cable disc
brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for heavy duty MTB riding.


Avoid hydraulic disc brakes at all costs. Stick to mechanical disc brakes.



Which require constant adjustments as the pads wear, have cables that
weather eats, etc.

All my bikes have disks the CX/gravel/adventure road? Is cable the others
are hydraulic.

The cable is a lot more fuss, the Hydros just work, once set up you feed
them pads which is very easy.

Personally as someone who rides off-road plus high (ish) miles commuting
disks and preferably Hydro are game changers in terms of performance and
maintenance.

In terms of stuff like power, there is quite a overlap between the two, my
gravel bikes cable disks is about as powerful as the old commute MTB with
its older and cheaper Hydro brakes, both are embarrassing weak compared to
my Full suspension MTB.


I recently upgrade to 8" rotors front and back. That was the real game
changer. I can lock up either wheel with one finger and brake response
is prontissimo. Now I no longer have to worry when riding a steep trail
with some cargo in the back.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #29  
Old March 30th 18, 01:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,402
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 3/29/2018 5:32 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/29/2018 4:19 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 9:47:20 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-29 12:25,
wrote:
On Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 4:09:07 PM UTC+2, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-28 20:28, James wrote:
On 28/03/18 01:39, Joerg wrote:


Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then
they require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy
business. On mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for
them. Cable disc brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for
heavy duty MTB riding.


With the use of a few hose clamps, a file that is harder than tool
steel, nails and rocks, I'm sure you could build a front wheel for
your
MTB using a motorcycle front hub, disc brake and lever.


After upgrading to 8" rotors front and back I am quite pleased with
the
brake performance of my MTB. The bleeding is messy but only needs
to be
done about once a year and takes 1/2h.



Once a year? Why?


Because after about a year the lever for the rear brake starts feeling
soft. Braking is still fine and most other riders just leave it like
that but I like the pressure point nice and hard. Also, the slightest
amount of air in the line near the caliper can cause a brake failure on
a long downhill which here in the hills is not cool.


Never bleed my brakes on my cross bike for 4 years now and they feel
like they did on day 1. Shimano must be doing something right.


Says the guy riding in Nederlands where there are no mountain lions. Of
course they work for you.


Keep in mind, nothing works for Joerg.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #30  
Old March 30th 18, 01:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,402
Default MTB disc brake caused wild fire

On 3/29/2018 5:34 PM, Roger Merriman wrote:
sms wrote:
On 3/27/2018 7:39 AM, Joerg wrote:

Hydraulics also can suffer from sudden fade and that's scary. Then they
require bleeding which, depending on the kind, is a messy business. On
mine particularly so because there is no bleed kit for them. Cable disc
brakes are fine for pavement riding, just not for heavy duty MTB riding.


Avoid hydraulic disc brakes at all costs. Stick to mechanical disc brakes.



Which require constant adjustments as the pads wear, have cables that
weather eats, etc.

All my bikes have disks the CX/gravel/adventure road? Is cable the others
are hydraulic.

The cable is a lot more fuss, the Hydros just work, once set up you feed
them pads which is very easy.

Personally as someone who rides off-road plus high (ish) miles commuting
disks and preferably Hydro are game changers in terms of performance and
maintenance.

In terms of stuff like power, there is quite a overlap between the two, my
gravel bikes cable disks is about as powerful as the old commute MTB with
its older and cheaper Hydro brakes, both are embarrassing weak compared to
my Full suspension MTB.


"Embarrassingly weak" sounds strange to me. Aren't you really talking
about overall mechanical advantage - that is, lever force vs. braking force?

Practical braking force, especially off-road, is limited by traction
and/or by risk of pitchover. I fail to see why getting that amount of
force from a one pound lever force is better than getting it from a two
pound lever force. I can squeeze a two pound force all day.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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