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Replacing a lost toolkit



 
 
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  #41  
Old August 19th 19, 12:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 495
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 16:41:58 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/18/2019 2:52 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

One lesson, that I learned is that, the all in one multi tool
conglomerated tools are a PITA to use and really awkward to use. ...


None have anything resembling a scraper, pointed
tweezers, lock raking tools, and other useful tools not associated
with bicycling.


Lock raking tools? Are those to acquire someone else's bicycle if yours
is giving trouble?



Well, as someone said, one should be prepared for any and all
emergencies :-)
--

Cheers,

John B.
Ads
  #42  
Old August 19th 19, 12:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 3,096
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 16:41:58 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/18/2019 2:52 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

One lesson, that I learned is that, the all in one multi tool
conglomerated tools are a PITA to use and really awkward to use. ...


None have anything resembling a scraper, pointed
tweezers, lock raking tools, and other useful tools not associated
with bicycling.


Lock raking tools? Are those to acquire someone else's bicycle if yours
is giving trouble?


They're to replace the bolt cutters and angle grinder, which are both
too heavy to carry on a ride.

Ever notice that many bicycle locks do not require a key to lock? Just
close the hasp, and it's locked. Unfortunately, some otherwise
intelligent riders are in the habit of locking their bicycle at the
local coffee shop, only to find that they have forgotten to bring the
key. Also, some lock their keys in their car. When I was riding more
often, this happened sufficiently often to inspire me to bring my
tools. Also, I like to show off a little. Single pin picking takes
too long, so I just rake the lock, use a bump key if available, or use
a bypass technique.

For a time, I suspected that some riders intentionally "forgot" their
keys, just to watch me pick their bicycle lock. I can't open every
lock, but I do well enough. I'm still a beginner and am far from
proficient.

BosnianBill:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bosnianbill+bicycle
https://www.youtube.com/user/bosnianbill/videos

LockPickingLawyer:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=lockpickinglawyer+bicycle
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm9K6rby98W8JigLoZOh6FQ/videos


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #43  
Old August 19th 19, 04:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,366
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Sat, 17 Aug 2019 18:22:20 -0400, Radey Shouman
wrote:

In my case: pocket knife, mosquito repellent sachets, small pliers (4"
channel lock), folding money ($5 wrapped around the spare tube), shower
cap to put on the saddle when bike is left in the rain, a few feet of so
of nylon cord, Park mt-1. I think I'll throw a lighter in there, just to be
completely boy scout.


I used the pliers in my wallet once. But I really, really needed them
that once. (In my wallet? I saw a really cute multi-tool really
cheap and bought it just because. I pinned it into the
folding-scissor pocket of my wallet so I wouldn't lose it on the way
home, and never got around to putting it someplace else.)

I never go *anywhere* without a pocket knife, especially my own back
yard. The knife in the pocket of my grubbies has an inch of
serrations good for cutting woody weeds.

I do refrain from weighting the pockets of my Sunday dresses with a
pocket knife, but being a member of the kitchen committee, I know
where we keep the good knives. And there's a single-edge razor blade
in the sewing kit in my pocket-size wallet.

Perhaps I should put a book of matches in a "Pill Pouch" bag and stash
it in my emergency kit.

The only thing in there that I've used recently is my sun visor.

I once badly needed the band-aid in my first-aid kit. That was many
years ago.

(Ever try to open a toolkit with one hand held high above your head?)

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #44  
Old August 19th 19, 01:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,259
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Monday, August 19, 2019 at 12:21:11 AM UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Ever notice that many bicycle locks do not require a key to lock? Just
close the hasp, and it's locked.


Jeff also sent some lock picking videos. Those links must burn the companies who made those locks. But lotta lock-makers and -users miss the point altogether. No lock is undefeatable -- all it can do is deter or delay a would-be thief. That said, some locks do that better than others.

One class of lock that I like is the Dutch ring lock, which is permanently attached to the seat stays and locked by removing the key; they're very difficult to bring an angle grind to bear on. You can see a ring lock in the fourth photo from the bottom at this link -- it is the component with the orange handle:
http://coolmainpress.com/BICYCLINGsmover.html
Some of that type come with a hefty plug-in chain which unlocks with the same key.

What I use nowadays to secure my bike is altogether more subtle. I simply present the bike as broken, the front wheel turned at a crazy angle different to the handlebars. This is done by a nifty piece of Swiss engineering called an n'lock (sic; all lc) which unlocks the handlebar from the steerer, thus making the bike unrideable. There's also a cable inside the handlebar that wraps around whatever you can find that plugs into the n'lock (which incorporates its own stem) and is unlocked with one twist of the key, but I rarely bother with it; there is also a longer loose cable with a loop at one end and the locking pin at the other but I don't even carry it. You can see the n'lock and its cables in action he
http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index....18768#msg18768
Very few people here drive trucks that they can boost even a broken bike onto and a rideaway thief dumb enough not to notice that the bike is broken will be planted face first into the tarmac within a couple of paces. Here are some unfortunate experiences of my own when I forgot the n'lock was in operation:
http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index....21571#msg21571

Deep wisdom found on the net:

1. Pqrst Zxerty says:
"Soon your locks are worth more than your bike that they cut throu your bike frame to steal the locks."

2. regular everyday normal modafuka says:
"I bought someone from a poor country to stand by my bike when I'm shopping.."

Andre Jute
70% of bikes stolen in France are stolen to order from people's homes
  #45  
Old August 19th 19, 02:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,259
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 11:54:07 PM UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:46:11 -0700 (PDT), Andre Jute
wrote:


The missing tool is an 8mm socket with common 1/4in drive stub on the
back, useful for changing gears on a Rohloff HGB if the cable breaks,
which hasn't happened to me in ten years, nor to anyone I know, but
better to be prepared.


If you remove the 8mm socket from your tool kit, the Rohloff gear hub
will surely break. I've never torn apart a Rohloff hub, but I suspect
that you really don't want to rebuild the hub during a ride or race.


Rohloff provides all the necessary information, but for most people it makes more sense to return the hub to Germany.

My problem is actually too much leverage rather than too little. My
bike is steel, not plastic, but 2-6Nm torque ratings abound, and the
more expensive the component, the lower the permitted torque. There's
even one oil-retention stud with a torque rating of 0.5Nm, I kid you
not. I do it up finger-high, which is probably already 2Nm.


You could add a torque wrench or torque indicator to your tool kit. I
have a good feel for how much torque is necessary and is being
applied. However, many people do not, due to arthritis or peripheral
neuropathy in the finger tips. I suppose a torque wrench would help:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-4-Drive-Bike-Torque-Wrench-Spanner-Set-Hex-Star-Bit-Fixing-Tool-2-14Nm/183791045377
AFAIK, nobody makes a bicycle tool that includes a torque wrench.


I have two torque wrenches in my bicycle kit, and several others in other toolkits. The two bicycle ones are a small bicycle specific model, BBB BT-73 https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/...-73&cat=direct -- same as your recommendation right down to the box on your example because the current BBB box is more recent -- and a big old truck-type that I used on my vintage Bentleys and which is good for fixing on bicycle cranks, 30Nm by brushing it with your pinky.

...death, and other inconveniences.


Heh-heh!

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Andre Jute
You're wicked, Jeff Liebermann
  #46  
Old August 19th 19, 02:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
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Posts: 1,310
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

Joy Beeson writes:

On Sat, 17 Aug 2019 18:22:20 -0400, Radey Shouman
wrote:

In my case: pocket knife, mosquito repellent sachets, small pliers (4"
channel lock), folding money ($5 wrapped around the spare tube), shower
cap to put on the saddle when bike is left in the rain, a few feet of so
of nylon cord, Park mt-1. I think I'll throw a lighter in there, just to be
completely boy scout.


I used the pliers in my wallet once. But I really, really needed them
that once. (In my wallet? I saw a really cute multi-tool really
cheap and bought it just because. I pinned it into the
folding-scissor pocket of my wallet so I wouldn't lose it on the way
home, and never got around to putting it someplace else.)

I never go *anywhere* without a pocket knife, especially my own back
yard. The knife in the pocket of my grubbies has an inch of
serrations good for cutting woody weeds.

I do refrain from weighting the pockets of my Sunday dresses with a
pocket knife, but being a member of the kitchen committee, I know
where we keep the good knives. And there's a single-edge razor blade
in the sewing kit in my pocket-size wallet.

Perhaps I should put a book of matches in a "Pill Pouch" bag and stash
it in my emergency kit.


Without cutting edges and fire we're just really weak apes with high
self esteem and lots of team spirit.

The only thing in there that I've used recently is my sun visor.

I once badly needed the band-aid in my first-aid kit. That was many
years ago.

(Ever try to open a toolkit with one hand held high above your head?)


I don't remember trying that. I have noticed that the bloody (no,
literally) band-aid packets seem to be much harder to open one handed
than they used to be. Not sure whether that's due to falling standards,
advancing personal decrepitude, or a failure of memory.
  #47  
Old August 19th 19, 03:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,821
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On 2019-08-18 10:35, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 7:59:40 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

Maybe because up to 40% of my rides happen on an MTB and rough
turf. Everything that isn't solidly bolted or cinched on flies
off.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


The Topeak has a plastic attachment that sometimes can vibrate the
cross-seatbar attachment off. But because of the size of the bag it
cannot rotate the bag into any position in which it could shake off.
I use them on everything now.

There is another method that has a locking bar that is almost
impossible to release even when you know how. Those work well too.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/ROCKBROS-MT...8IAF 5UbXMEow


I found this kind of plastic latch to eventually break off on the MTB if
their are used in a "rigid" way, meaning without a strap in line with it.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #48  
Old August 23rd 19, 11:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,610
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On 8/19/2019 7:50 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

I found this kind of plastic latch to eventually break off on the MTB if
their are used in a "rigid" way, meaning without a strap in line with it.


I agree. I don't like these plastic latches. Straps are more time
consuming but more reliable.
 




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