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Weights of my bikes



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 17th 21, 06:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
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Posts: 2,196
Default Weights of my bikes

Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.
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  #2  
Old May 17th 21, 07:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ade
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Posts: 5
Default Weights of my bikes

On 17/05/2021 18:39, Tom Kunich wrote:
Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.


Making bikes light is one thing, making them last is another.

My last allow bike was a Specialised Allez. The frame was light enough,
about 1.5KG (3 lbs in old speak). I weighed it when I stripped it for
return, it had cracked due to fatigue. It was a thing of beauty, much
nicer than the horrid oversized carbon frame they replaced it with.

My previous alloy Trek failed at about the same distance, ~10,000 miles.

I thought the benefit of titanium was that like steel it had a fatigue
limit, meaning it wouldn't inevitably eventually fatigue like aluminium.
I know aluminium bikes can be made so the fatigue failure takes a long
time, but I suspect this adds weight. So I bought a cheap heavy gravel
type bike, it is real heavy, but surprisingly fun to ride.
  #3  
Old May 17th 21, 08:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
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Posts: 826
Default Weights of my bikes

Op maandag 17 mei 2021 om 19:39:41 UTC+2 schreef :
Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.


With off the shelf parts 2014 and a heavy saddle:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/N8frpRqH5fuj2tuA6
https://photos.app.goo.gl/PMxriEU7B8VVnMieA
Still my climbing bike,

Lou
  #4  
Old May 17th 21, 11:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 5,697
Default Weights of my bikes

On Mon, 17 May 2021 19:53:11 +0100, Ade
wrote:

On 17/05/2021 18:39, Tom Kunich wrote:
Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.


Making bikes light is one thing, making them last is another.

My last allow bike was a Specialised Allez. The frame was light enough,
about 1.5KG (3 lbs in old speak). I weighed it when I stripped it for
return, it had cracked due to fatigue. It was a thing of beauty, much
nicer than the horrid oversized carbon frame they replaced it with.

My previous alloy Trek failed at about the same distance, ~10,000 miles.

I thought the benefit of titanium was that like steel it had a fatigue
limit, meaning it wouldn't inevitably eventually fatigue like aluminium.
I know aluminium bikes can be made so the fatigue failure takes a long
time, but I suspect this adds weight. So I bought a cheap heavy gravel
type bike, it is real heavy, but surprisingly fun to ride.


Given that the CDC reports that 70.2% of U.S. adults are overweight or
obese the frantic search for a lighter bicycle seems rather futile.
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-inf...ity#definition
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #5  
Old May 18th 21, 01:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 5,870
Default Weights of my bikes

On Monday, May 17, 2021 at 12:05:58 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Op maandag 17 mei 2021 om 19:39:41 UTC+2 schreef :
Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.

With off the shelf parts 2014 and a heavy saddle:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/N8frpRqH5fuj2tuA6
https://photos.app.goo.gl/PMxriEU7B8VVnMieA
Still my climbing bike,


Impressive. I get that it is light which makes it easier to ascend, but do you lose performance elsewhere? My Emonda SLR was Trek's bleeding edge light bike, and it is clearly not the last word in sprinting stiffness -- but since my sprint could be clocked with a calendar, its no big loss. Oddly, my relative boat-anchor Synapse "endurance" bike is basically stiffer everywhere and has a more harsh road feel, although that is mitigated with 28mm tires.

BTW, your garage operating room is again impressive. I wouldn't know how to work in such a clean, well organized and lighted space. It would be disorienting. I'm acclimated to the dim, industrial revolution feel of my garage and basement shop.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #6  
Old May 18th 21, 02:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Weights of my bikes

On 5/17/2021 2:53 PM, Ade wrote:

Making bikes light is one thing, making them last is another.

My last allow bike was a Specialised Allez. The frame was light enough,
about 1.5KG (3 lbs in old speak). I weighed it when I stripped it for
return, it had cracked due to fatigue. It was a thing of beauty, much
nicer than the horrid oversized carbon frame they replaced it with.

My previous alloy Trek failed at about the same distance, ~10,000 miles.

I thought the benefit of titanium was that like steel it had a fatigue
limit, meaning it wouldn't inevitably eventually fatigue like aluminium.
I know aluminium bikes can be made so the fatigue failure takes a long
time, but I suspect this adds weight.


Well, as we've mentioned, steel and titanium alloys can and do fail by
fatigue - specifically, when a local stress exceeds the fatigue limit.
The way to prevent that is usually to make things heavier.

The difference with aluminum alloys is that at least in principle, every
aluminum bit subject to fatigue loading will _eventually_ fatigue. But
if it fails after enough billions of fatigue cycles, the original
designer usually doesn't care.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #7  
Old May 18th 21, 03:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 6,153
Default Weights of my bikes

On 18/5/21 10:22 am, jbeattie wrote:


BTW, your garage operating room is again impressive. I wouldn't know
how to work in such a clean, well organized and lighted space. It
would be disorienting. I'm acclimated to the dim, industrial
revolution feel of my garage and basement shop.


That's a garage? I thought it was Lou's kitchen!

--
JS
  #8  
Old May 18th 21, 09:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ade
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Posts: 5
Default Weights of my bikes

On 18/05/2021 02:23, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/17/2021 2:53 PM, Ade wrote:

Making bikes light is one thing, making them last is another.

My last allow bike was a Specialised Allez. The frame was light
enough, about 1.5KG (3 lbs in old speak). I weighed it when I stripped
it for return, it had cracked due to fatigue. It was a thing of
beauty, much nicer than the horrid oversized carbon frame they
replaced it with.

My previous alloy Trek failed at about the same distance, ~10,000 miles.

I thought the benefit of titanium was that like steel it had a fatigue
limit, meaning it wouldn't inevitably eventually fatigue like
aluminium. I know aluminium bikes can be made so the fatigue failure
takes a long time, but I suspect this adds weight.


Well, as we've mentioned, steel and titanium alloys can and do fail by
fatigue - specifically, when a local stress exceeds the fatigue limit.
The way to prevent that is usually to make things heavier.

The difference with aluminum alloys is that at least in principle, every
aluminum bit subject to fatigue loading will _eventually_ fatigue. But
if it fails after enough billions of fatigue cycles, the original
designer usually doesn't care.


I reckon 10,000 miles is in the region of only 6 million stress cycles.
Assuming stress cycles are predominantly from pedalling.

In my case that was about 4 years, not really enough.

My suspicion is that very few bikes get ridden 10,000 miles. They either
get ridden occasionally or replaced regularly. It is probably cheaper to
give lifetime guarantees and quote fantasy figures for fatigue cycles,
rather than engineer light aluminium frames that do last a lifetime
  #9  
Old May 18th 21, 01:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
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Posts: 826
Default Weights of my bikes

Op dinsdag 18 mei 2021 om 02:22:54 UTC+2 schreef jbeattie:
On Monday, May 17, 2021 at 12:05:58 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Op maandag 17 mei 2021 om 19:39:41 UTC+2 schreef :
Colnago CLX3.0 bare - 15.8 lbs
Lemond Zurich bare - 20.3 lbs
Douglas Vector with seatpack. - 17.4
Douglas Ti with water bottle and seat pack. - 20.3 lbs.
Eddy Merckx with bottle half full and heavy seatpack - 20.8

My 2018 Trek Emonda bare was 17.5 lbs.

As you can see, aluminum bikes do not necessary have a weight penalty.. Nor are titanium bikes particularly light.

I would say that since about 2001 that most decent bikes couldn't be declared as "heavy". The complete Look KG585 which was a light climbing bike was 16 lbs even bare.

With off the shelf parts 2014 and a heavy saddle:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/N8frpRqH5fuj2tuA6
https://photos.app.goo.gl/PMxriEU7B8VVnMieA
Still my climbing bike,

Impressive. I get that it is light which makes it easier to ascend, but do you lose performance elsewhere? My Emonda SLR was Trek's bleeding edge light bike, and it is clearly not the last word in sprinting stiffness -- but since my sprint could be clocked with a calendar, its no big loss. Oddly, my relative boat-anchor Synapse "endurance" bike is basically stiffer everywhere and has a more harsh road feel, although that is mitigated with 28mm tires.

BTW, your garage operating room is again impressive. I wouldn't know how to work in such a clean, well organized and lighted space. It would be disorienting. I'm acclimated to the dim, industrial revolution feel of my garage and basement shop.

-- Jay Beattie.


That bike is a joy to ride uphill and is very stable downhill. I never had any problem with stiffness or lack off with any bike I had. I'm not a sprinter either, you would probably beat me. If one is coming from a heavy bike, lets say 9.5 kg, you have to get used to riding a 6.7 kg bike but that takes just a couple of rides. For me that moment has passed 15 years ago. On the flats my default bike is my Aeroad, but I ride the dirtiest bike at a given moment. At the moment it is the Ultimate until that one needs a cleaning. Bad weather bike in the summer is also the Ultimate (aluminum rims and rim brakes). My Moots is my bad weather road bike in the winter and a gravel bike in the summer. I don't like ATB. Glad I could sell both for a reasonable price. Off road I use a cross bike. I have nothing to wish for now.

My garage, ah well. When I bought my house I practiced my DIY skills in the garage. Plumbing, electro wiring, tiling, plastering, painting, woodwork etc. I ended up with a nice garage and DIY skills. Over the years some tweaking took place ;-)

Lou
  #10  
Old May 18th 21, 01:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
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Posts: 826
Default Weights of my bikes

Op dinsdag 18 mei 2021 om 10:37:14 UTC+2 schreef Ade:
On 18/05/2021 02:23, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/17/2021 2:53 PM, Ade wrote:

Making bikes light is one thing, making them last is another.

My last allow bike was a Specialised Allez. The frame was light
enough, about 1.5KG (3 lbs in old speak). I weighed it when I stripped
it for return, it had cracked due to fatigue. It was a thing of
beauty, much nicer than the horrid oversized carbon frame they
replaced it with.

My previous alloy Trek failed at about the same distance, ~10,000 miles.

I thought the benefit of titanium was that like steel it had a fatigue
limit, meaning it wouldn't inevitably eventually fatigue like
aluminium. I know aluminium bikes can be made so the fatigue failure
takes a long time, but I suspect this adds weight.


Well, as we've mentioned, steel and titanium alloys can and do fail by
fatigue - specifically, when a local stress exceeds the fatigue limit.
The way to prevent that is usually to make things heavier.

The difference with aluminum alloys is that at least in principle, every
aluminum bit subject to fatigue loading will _eventually_ fatigue. But
if it fails after enough billions of fatigue cycles, the original
designer usually doesn't care.

I reckon 10,000 miles is in the region of only 6 million stress cycles.
Assuming stress cycles are predominantly from pedalling.

In my case that was about 4 years, not really enough.

My suspicion is that very few bikes get ridden 10,000 miles. They either
get ridden occasionally or replaced regularly. It is probably cheaper to
give lifetime guarantees and quote fantasy figures for fatigue cycles,
rather than engineer light aluminium frames that do last a lifetime


Every road bike I have/had has or will be ridden 10000 miles/16000 km.

Lou
 




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