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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #151  
Old January 14th 15, 11:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 606
Default AG: The bread-bag trick

On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 23:23:57 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 18:58:54 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Why not put the bag on over the sock and then foot, sock and bag, into
the shoe?


Same reason I don't put my windbreaker on under my jersey. The
bread-bag trick is for times when you have to wear summer shoes in the
winter; if you buy a special shoe large enough to wear over thick
socks, it might as well be one without ventilation holes.


Joy, if you buy some big burly boots to stomp around in the snow you
probably don't want any ventilation holes :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
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  #152  
Old January 14th 15, 02:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Duane[_3_]
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Posts: 1,900
Default AG: The bread-bag trick

On 14/01/2015 6:26 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 23:23:57 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 18:58:54 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Why not put the bag on over the sock and then foot, sock and bag, into
the shoe?


Same reason I don't put my windbreaker on under my jersey. The
bread-bag trick is for times when you have to wear summer shoes in the
winter; if you buy a special shoe large enough to wear over thick
socks, it might as well be one without ventilation holes.


Joy, if you buy some big burly boots to stomp around in the snow you
probably don't want any ventilation holes :-)



Ah, perhaps I missed the first part of this thread. If we're talking
about cycling shoes with vents causing problems in the winter, what I
usually do is wear the bootie things which cover the vents on top of the
shoe. Then you can use a different sole insert to block the holes under
the shoe, like a Dr. Scholl's liner etc.
  #153  
Old January 17th 15, 04:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,100
Default AG: The bread-bag trick

On Wed, 14 Jan 2015 09:27:40 -0500, Duane
wrote:

Ah, perhaps I missed the first part of this thread. If we're talking
about cycling shoes with vents causing problems in the winter, what I
usually do is wear the bootie things which cover the vents on top of the
shoe. Then you can use a different sole insert to block the holes under
the shoe, like a Dr. Scholl's liner etc.


I didn't like the first pair of booties I bought, so there was never
another. (I don't recall seeing any for sale, come to think of it.)
Now that we have on-line shopping, I probably could find decent
booties -- but now that I no longer live on a state road, there are
hardly any cold days when it's safe for old ladies to go out -- the
plastic bags are less trouble than hunting down and keeping track of
booties. (And there's something to be said for disposing of one's
shoe covers after every ride.)

I wonder whether they still make the toe covers that attach to toe
straps? Those worked quite well. If you could find a pair that fit.

Footnote: it wasn't just any state road. I lived across from the
county garage where the snowplows and the emergency dispatcher hung
out, between the state snowplow garage and the town snowplow garage, a
few doors from a sheriff's substation, and among two schools, two
firehouses, and an ambulance bay. If my road wasn't clean, nobody was
going anywhere.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #154  
Old January 18th 15, 03:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,100
Default AG: Winter Hydration


You don't need as much water in the winter as in the summer, but it's
at least as important to get enough. Dehydration lowers your heat
production, and low blood volume reduces your ability to distribute
heat.

It's much harder to remember to keep sipping a half-frozen beverage
than it is to remember to sip often when you are sweating like a
faucet, so dehydration may actually be more likely in cold weather.

Filling the bottle with a boiling beverage sounds like a good idea --
but before the beverage is cool enough to be safe to sip, the valve
freezes and you can't get at it.

Carry only one bottle in winter; a second bottle will freeze before
you finish the first one. If there are no refilling stops, carry the
extra in your pannier, well wrapped. Starting with hot water can
help. I've found Rubbermaid's square quart bottles good for carrying
water and ice in the summer; I can no longer ride far enough to need
back-up water in the winter, so I haven't tested them for carrying
warm drinks. A large container from which you re-fill your bottle
will freeze less than spare bottles, and you don't have to worry about
frozen valves.

Be sure the bottle is tipped up when you drink, so that ice floats
away from the valve. Don't squeeze the bottle or suck on it; any ice
near the valve will be carried into it. Blow air into the bottle and
let the water flow out This moves ice away from the valve and may
melt a molecule of ice.

Drink frequently to keep the valve open.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



  #155  
Old January 19th 15, 03:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Duane[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,900
Default AG: The bread-bag trick

On 16/01/2015 11:13 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Jan 2015 09:27:40 -0500, Duane
wrote:

Ah, perhaps I missed the first part of this thread. If we're talking
about cycling shoes with vents causing problems in the winter, what I
usually do is wear the bootie things which cover the vents on top of the
shoe. Then you can use a different sole insert to block the holes under
the shoe, like a Dr. Scholl's liner etc.


I didn't like the first pair of booties I bought, so there was never
another. (I don't recall seeing any for sale, come to think of it.)
Now that we have on-line shopping, I probably could find decent
booties -- but now that I no longer live on a state road, there are
hardly any cold days when it's safe for old ladies to go out -- the
plastic bags are less trouble than hunting down and keeping track of
booties. (And there's something to be said for disposing of one's
shoe covers after every ride.)

I wonder whether they still make the toe covers that attach to toe
straps? Those worked quite well. If you could find a pair that fit.

Footnote: it wasn't just any state road. I lived across from the
county garage where the snowplows and the emergency dispatcher hung
out, between the state snowplow garage and the town snowplow garage, a
few doors from a sheriff's substation, and among two schools, two
firehouses, and an ambulance bay. If my road wasn't clean, nobody was
going anywhere.



I don't know if they still make the covers that attach to toe straps but
they do make the toe covers that slide over the front of your shoes. I
use these when it's not too cold as the booties tend to be too warm,
even on cold days.
  #156  
Old January 25th 15, 06:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,100
Default AG: Winter Hills


Don't charge hills in winter. If you try to climb without slowing
down, you'll get all sweaty and then freeze when you are coasting down
the other side.

When climbing a hill, you are out of the wind and generating heat --
make it last! Shift down, and pedal just hard enough to keep warm.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #157  
Old January 28th 15, 01:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
dgk
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Posts: 827
Default AG: Winter Hills

On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:36:05 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:


Don't charge hills in winter. If you try to climb without slowing
down, you'll get all sweaty and then freeze when you are coasting down
the other side.

When climbing a hill, you are out of the wind and generating heat --
make it last! Shift down, and pedal just hard enough to keep warm.


Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.
  #158  
Old January 29th 15, 12:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,100
Default AG: Winter Hills

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.


And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
  #159  
Old January 29th 15, 11:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 606
Default AG: Winter Hills

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.


And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.


I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
  #160  
Old January 29th 15, 01:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Duane[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,900
Default AG: Winter Hills

On 29/01/2015 6:54 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.


And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.


I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)


Until the wind blows the sand from the beach over those paths.
 




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