A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

my fixie doesn't need improvement



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old February 21st 18, 01:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,494
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2/20/2018 7:36 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 5:07:37 PM UTC-8, Ralph Barone wrote:
Joy Beeson wrote:
On Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:24:43 -0800 (PST), wrote:

Huh??? Always the same shoes???

You mean that there are clipless pedals that will work with whatever
shoe I already have on?


You missed Lou's picture. He has 20 pairs of shoes expressly for his
clipless pedals.


Neatly arranged on a custom fabricated,CNC milled aluminum shoe rack in his garage operating room. My house isn't as clean as his garage.

-- Jay Beattie.



Ten pair of shoes but no SiDis??

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #74  
Old February 21st 18, 08:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 236
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 1:01:27 AM UTC+1, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:24:43 -0800 (PST), wrote:

Huh??? Always the same shoes???


You mean that there are clipless pedals that will work with whatever
shoe I already have on?

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


Of course but they will ride unpleasantly and you don't benifit from the clipless feature. I made a joke BTW. Replace all your current shoes with shoes with SPD cleats en put SPD pedals on all your bikes and your problem is solved ;-).

Lou
  #77  
Old February 22nd 18, 08:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 236
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Thursday, February 22, 2018 at 12:46:01 AM UTC+1, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:38:47 -0800 (PST), wrote:

Of course but they will ride unpleasantly
and you don't benifit from the clipless feature.
I made a joke BTW.


I'm not all that funereal in this thread either.


Replace all your current shoes with shoes with SPD cleats


I have a pair of fleece-lined cycling shoes and a pair of ventilated
cycling shoes. Why would I want more?


en put SPD pedals on all your bikes


All one of them.

The Trek Pure, which has platform pedals, doesn't count as a bike; I
bought it when I needed a pedal-powered wheelchair.

And I'm delighted to say that it's quite dusty right now.


and your problem is solved ;-).


Except for the part where I ride in walking shoes when I'm within city
limits.

And that stretch north of Thirty, west of Spring Creek, where I walk
every hill. (If I ever get strong enough to ride thirty miles in one
day again. I've been riding in sandals all winter. Mostly because I
can't go very far, partly because it's too cold to wear the
fleece-lined shoes.

A cycling shoe that isn't too stiff to walk in isn't worth putting on.


--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


Some people are better of with platform pedals for their kind of riding. I think you one of them. I'm not. I have one bike with platform pedals and every time I use that bike it feels like my feet are never at the right position. All other bikes have clipless pedals. I use Speedplay, Look and SPD pedals. Three kinds of pedals is one of the reasons I have so many shoes. I think I will phase out the Speedplay pedals. For my wide feet it is a pain in the ass to get good shoes for those pedals (choice is limited for the 4 screw mounting). The current Speedplay shoes and pedals are almost worn. YMMV.

Lou
  #78  
Old February 23rd 18, 06:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,810
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted everything back to DT
shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my bikes and the extra cables
interfere with that. Since I'm not racing, the minor inconvenience of
reaching down to shift is a moot point for me. Plus- maybe this is a
function of my generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have wireless shifters
that are reliable, ...


Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display bluntly
scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred. Please can 1-800 ..."
:-)


LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have to reboot my
bike."

... then I'd probably think about brifters again (this
doesn't necessarily mean bluetooth or something like that; I think it
would be easily possible to connect an electrical circuit through the
frame to control the derailleurs. Possibly using something like the
Rene Herse circuit for powering headlights from a rear
triangle-mounted generator, which used a brush inside the headtube as
the connector from the frame to the fork).


What is that triangle-mounted generator and can one still buy those?
In web links all I could see was a rear-mounted bottle dynamo.

http://www.jimlangley.net/ride/ReneHerseBicycle.html


that'd be it. In the olden days when I was a sprat, the tubes from the
seattube back were called "the rear triangle." From the seattube
forward was the "front triangle." The seattube managed to be a side of
both triangles. I haven't kept up on what the young 'uns of today call
it.

In my reference, generators mounted on the seatstay or chainstays would
be "rear triangle" mounted. Because the frame is the ground (earth on
the east side of the Atlantic), a single wire ran through the frame
tubes. It connected to a carbon brush in the head tube, which me
contact with an insulated ring on the steerer tube. A wire from that
traveled through the front rack to the headlight.

Something similar could be done through the handlebars to the frame and
then to the derailleurs. Some years back Mavic used the rotation of the
jockey wheels to drive actuation of the rear derailleur, the shifter
button on the handlebars acting as a release. I don't recall offhand
what they did with the front derailleur. It was not 100% reliable.
There was a famous moment of Bjarne Riis hurling his malfunctioning
Mavic-equipped TT bike in frustration at the TdF and that was the end of
that product. Chris Boardman made it work pretty well, though.

Of course nowadays having a single chainring up front and a huge-range
cassette is common, so only one derailleur would be necessary (Ritchey
tried to market that 25 years ago as the 1x9 system and it didn't catch
on; Bianchi marketed 700C mountain bike wheels and that dodn't catch on
either. Everything old is new again).

I have looked for roller dynamos to mount in the triangle but they
seem to have vanished from the marketplace. The only ones I saw were
expensive used or NOS versions, often from unknown sources.


I have a Sanyo BB generator on one of my bikes- very smook, low
resistance, quiet. I did have to overhaul it once with instructions
from Andrew, probably will have to do that again in another 30 years.

For known sources, contact Mr. Muzi. He's listed a Union BB generator
on his site for years.

Otherwise eBay. The Sanyos pop up there from time to time, often
NIB/NOS.

The battery I have on the road bike has sufficient capacity for my
longest rides but a roller dynamo would allow me to mount a much
smaller one.


Yep. And a convenient backup in case the battery is flat. Any 6v 3W
generator will power a nice Schmidt or B&M LED 100 lux headlight plus a
taillight. Great range of choices available these days for any set of
preferences.
  #79  
Old February 24th 18, 07:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,213
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted everything back to DT
shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my bikes and the extra cables
interfere with that. Since I'm not racing, the minor inconvenience of
reaching down to shift is a moot point for me. Plus- maybe this is a
function of my generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have wireless shifters
that are reliable, ...


Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display bluntly
scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred. Please can 1-800 ..."
:-)


LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have to reboot my
bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop because new
software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal shifting behavior. In
the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15 minutes in the garage
sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.

I just had another experience with "modern" hardware. After we got home
on Monday night a high-falutin pressure assist toilet was constantly
running. Can't wait to get the next water bill. So I checked it. Instead
of replacing a $2 flapper in about two minutes now you get to replace a
$40 cartridge that is in itself not serviceable, as in glued together.
The cartridge, of course, refuses to come out as best as it can. Do they
use marine grease in the assembly process? Of course not. That would
make service too easy. Takes raw force, always worrying something will
go ka-crunch and blood runs from your knuckles. To diagnose the problem
you also have to take off a pressure reducer, clean a sieve, open and
clean an air vent. Long story short, $40 and an hour later it works
again. For a while ... Oh, and then a few years ago we got a recall
notice saying these things can explode and that a rework kit had to be
installed on all of them. After which the flush was ... underwhelming
and now you need two 1.6 gallon flushes versus one 3 gallon flush on the
old toilet. Progress. Indeed.


... then I'd probably think about brifters again (this
doesn't necessarily mean bluetooth or something like that; I think it
would be easily possible to connect an electrical circuit through the
frame to control the derailleurs. Possibly using something like the
Rene Herse circuit for powering headlights from a rear
triangle-mounted generator, which used a brush inside the headtube as
the connector from the frame to the fork).


What is that triangle-mounted generator and can one still buy those?
In web links all I could see was a rear-mounted bottle dynamo.

http://www.jimlangley.net/ride/ReneHerseBicycle.html


that'd be it. In the olden days when I was a sprat, the tubes from the
seattube back were called "the rear triangle." From the seattube
forward was the "front triangle." The seattube managed to be a side of
both triangles. I haven't kept up on what the young 'uns of today call
it.

In my reference, generators mounted on the seatstay or chainstays would
be "rear triangle" mounted. Because the frame is the ground (earth on
the east side of the Atlantic), a single wire ran through the frame
tubes. It connected to a carbon brush in the head tube, which me
contact with an insulated ring on the steerer tube. A wire from that
traveled through the front rack to the headlight.


And ground went via the bearings like it does in most European dynamos
set-ups? That was always a sick concept. I don't think in automotive
anyone would let a blooper like that pass a design review. Yet that was
and maybe still is standard fare on most dynamo-equiped bicycles.


Something similar could be done through the handlebars to the frame and
then to the derailleurs. Some years back Mavic used the rotation of the
jockey wheels to drive actuation of the rear derailleur, the shifter
button on the handlebars acting as a release. I don't recall offhand
what they did with the front derailleur. It was not 100% reliable.
There was a famous moment of Bjarne Riis hurling his malfunctioning
Mavic-equipped TT bike in frustration at the TdF and that was the end of
that product. Chris Boardman made it work pretty well, though.

Of course nowadays having a single chainring up front and a huge-range
cassette is common, so only one derailleur would be necessary (Ritchey
tried to market that 25 years ago as the 1x9 system and it didn't catch
on; Bianchi marketed 700C mountain bike wheels and that dodn't catch on
either. Everything old is new again).


I have a MTB cassette on my road bike. Once reaching a certain age that
is really nice when you live in hilly terrain. Unfortunately no granny
gear up front so on routes with steep hills I just take the MTB.
Pavement wears the rear tires fast but I can get good Thai tires for
around $20.


I have looked for roller dynamos to mount in the triangle but they
seem to have vanished from the marketplace. The only ones I saw were
expensive used or NOS versions, often from unknown sources.


I have a Sanyo BB generator on one of my bikes- very smook, low
resistance, quiet. I did have to overhaul it once with instructions
from Andrew, probably will have to do that again in another 30 years.

For known sources, contact Mr. Muzi. He's listed a Union BB generator
on his site for years.

Otherwise eBay. The Sanyos pop up there from time to time, often
NIB/NOS.

The battery I have on the road bike has sufficient capacity for my
longest rides but a roller dynamo would allow me to mount a much
smaller one.


Yep. And a convenient backup in case the battery is flat. Any 6v 3W
generator will power a nice Schmidt or B&M LED 100 lux headlight plus a
taillight. Great range of choices available these days for any set of
preferences.


For now I'll leave it all on Li-Ion only. They pack so much energy that
it lasts well through my usual trips which are rarely longer than 5h
riding time. Some day I might experiment with solar. I saw that on a
serious MTB, a couple that was preparing for a multi-week longhaul trip.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #80  
Old February 24th 18, 08:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,975
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2/24/2018 2:57 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:


In my reference, generators mounted on the seatstay or chainstays would
be "rear triangle" mounted.* Because the frame is the ground (earth on
the east side of the Atlantic), a single wire ran through the frame
tubes.* It connected to a carbon brush in the head tube, which me
contact with an insulated ring on the steerer tube.* A wire from that
traveled through the front rack to the headlight.


And ground went via the bearings like it does in most European dynamos
set-ups? That was always a sick concept. I don't think in automotive
anyone would let a blooper like that pass a design review. Yet that was
and maybe still is standard fare on most dynamo-equiped bicycles.


I agree that grounding via the bike frame is a bad idea. But it's always
been possible to run a two-conductor cord and ground things properly,
which is what I've done at least since 1980.

And AFAIK all hub dynamos have always used proper grounding through a
two-conductor cord.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SELF IMPROVEMENT RETURNS ! datakoll Techniques 1 November 19th 09 01:06 AM
improvement of countries Andre Racing 25 September 20th 08 02:50 AM
Driver Improvement Schemes rola UK 4 February 15th 07 08:15 PM
Improvement :-D wafflycat UK 16 March 30th 05 11:04 AM
Fixie frame found, Fuji Questions, and WTB fixie cranks, wheels,bb, seat,& rear rack Tim Lines Techniques 0 August 17th 03 09:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.