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Selecting a Bike



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 11th 08, 05:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Katuzo
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Posts: 13
Default Selecting a Bike

Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds). When I went to the LBS,
and told them I wanted a bike that was also comfortable, and could
take some bumps (be easy on my butt + back), handle curbs, be fitted
with baskets and perhaps even be ridden in a campground occasionally
or a dirt path, they told me to go with something like a Giant Sedona
or a Cannondale Comfort 5 instead. When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes like the Iron Horse
Warrior 3, except for one buddy who got a $100 dual suspension bike
whose bearing failed in a coupled of yrs. So right now, I basically
confused with conflicting advice. It seems that big tires are the way
to gain comfort but exercise bikes don't seem to have them, and if the
bike isn't comfortable I know I won't ride it. I really would like a
dual suspension, even if it's used + a little scratched. But I really
don't know which way to really choose the style because there such a
selection of bikes out there, not like when I was a kid, it actually a
little confusing. Could you some help sorting this out.
Thanks
Ads
  #2  
Old July 11th 08, 08:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Chalo
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Posts: 4,943
Default Selecting a Bike

Katuzo wrote:

Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds). When I went to the LBS,
and told them I wanted a bike that was also comfortable, and could
take some bumps (be easy on my butt + back), handle curbs, be fitted
with baskets and perhaps even be ridden in a campground occasionally
or a dirt path, they told me to go with something like a Giant Sedona
or a Cannondale Comfort 5 instead.


The difference between the Giant FCR3 and the Giant Sedona is that the
latter bike has 26" wheels. Such wheels can be fitted with fatter
tires, and they are naturally stronger.

When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes like the Iron Horse
Warrior 3, except for one buddy who got a $100 dual suspension bike
whose bearing failed in a coupled of yrs. So right now, I basically
confused with conflicting advice. It seems that big tires are the way
to gain comfort but exercise bikes don't seem to have them, and if the
bike isn't comfortable I know I won't ride it.


Whether you'll be more comfortable on a so-called mountain bike or a
comfort bike is a matter of personal preference and how far you intend
to ride at one time. Comfort bikes are great for short rides at low
effort levels, but they impede the process of strong athletic
riding.

Stay away from department store bikes of any kind. They are generally
made in only one size, so you most likely won't be able to find one
that fits you properly. They are almost always incompetently
assembled and made of the cheapest parts and materials available.
Many worthy bike shops won't service them because they are more
trouble than they are worth.

I really would like a
dual suspension, even if it's used + a little scratched.


No you wouldn't. It's not worth it unless you intend to ride on very
harsh surfaces. You'll waste a lot of muscle power bouncing the bike
on its suspension, but you probably won't find the ride much more
pleasant than a normal fat-tire bike on a normal road surface. Dual
suspension bikes require a lot more service over time than rigid frame
bikes do, and they cost a lot more for any given level of quality.

Simple is better. For comfort, fat tires at low pressure are
beneficial, but large diameter wheels are also helpful. You can have
both if you get a bike with 29" wheels (that's a 700c road-bike-sized
rim with a 2"+ mountain bike sized tire on it). The Redline D440 29er
is a good and cost-effective option if you want multiple gears. The
Redline Monocog 29er is good if you are interested in a single speed
bike.

Make sure the bike fits you acceptably well. You should see to it
that the handlebars are no lower than the height of the saddle, and
preferably a few inches higher, if comfort is of paramount
importance. Lower handlebars are for efficiency at high speeds at the
expense of comfort. And take care to get a saddle you can live with;
most originally equipped saddles are terrible.

Chalo
  #3  
Old July 11th 08, 12:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Roger Zoul
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Posts: 1,118
Default Selecting a Bike


"Katuzo" wrote in message
...
Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds). When I went to the LBS,
and told them I wanted a bike that was also comfortable, and could
take some bumps (be easy on my butt + back), handle curbs, be fitted
with baskets and perhaps even be ridden in a campground occasionally
or a dirt path, they told me to go with something like a Giant Sedona
or a Cannondale Comfort 5 instead. When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes like the Iron Horse
Warrior 3, except for one buddy who got a $100 dual suspension bike
whose bearing failed in a coupled of yrs. So right now, I basically
confused with conflicting advice. It seems that big tires are the way
to gain comfort but exercise bikes don't seem to have them, and if the
bike isn't comfortable I know I won't ride it. I really would like a
dual suspension, even if it's used + a little scratched. But I really
don't know which way to really choose the style because there such a
selection of bikes out there, not like when I was a kid, it actually a
little confusing. Could you some help sorting this out.
Thanks


Why do you want a comfort bike but yet want to hop curbs or ride dirt paths?

Consider a recumbent bike and ride centuries on the road! Put some 1.5-inch
tires on a LWB like this one:
http://www.ransbikes.com/SXP07.htm
And you'll be in comfort all day...

There are a whole host of other types of recumbents, such as these:
www.catrike.com

Both are American made bike companies, btw. You can add accessories to put
your stuff in...and you don't really need suspension (or you may not need it
unless you ride really rough roads).

No hand, butts, neck, or shoulder pain with either of these.



  #4  
Old July 11th 08, 12:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Katuzo
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Posts: 13
Default Selecting a Bike

Thanks for the info about rim size and comfort, I didn't see that in
any of my research so far.

So the Giant FCR3 (700cc), Giant Sedona (26"), Cannondale Comfort 5
(26") and the Redline D440 29er (29") would all be good bikes for
exercising. The main difference in comfort would start at their wheel
diameter, and then if I could use a mountain bike sized tire on it. So
the either the Giant FCR3 or the Redline D440 would be the way to,
based on wheel size alone. Now all I have to figure out is which one
can take a 2"+ mountain bike tire.

I wonder why the Sedona and Comfort 5 are rated more for comfort even
they have a smaller wheel diameter? Is it because of the wider tires
they come with or could it be because of the seat?

How far do I plan on riding? On a daily ride, they say you must
exercise your heart for 30 minutes. Including warm up and cool down,
that would probably be 35 minutes. How far can you go on a bike in 35
minutes? I really don't know.
  #5  
Old July 11th 08, 03:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
OughtFour
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39
Default Selecting a Bike


"Katuzo" wrote in message
...
Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say.... When I went to the
LBS....,
When I talked to the people at
work, they ....


Never mind all that.

Test ride some bikes and see what you like.

Go to a couple of bike stores and try different machines. Including, but not
limited to, what they recommend. Tell them you don;t know what you like and
are there to find out.

After a short while you'll be able to say things like, This one was very
comfortable but hard to ride uphill, and learn from the LBS what the
tradeoffs are.

Your experience is the best teacher.


  #6  
Old July 11th 08, 04:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
David L. Johnson
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Posts: 1,048
Default Selecting a Bike

Katuzo wrote:
Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds). When I went to the LBS,
and told them I wanted a bike that was also comfortable, and could
take some bumps (be easy on my butt + back), handle curbs, be fitted
with baskets and perhaps even be ridden in a campground occasionally
or a dirt path, they told me to go with something like a Giant Sedona
or a Cannondale Comfort 5 instead. When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes like the Iron Horse
Warrior 3, except for one buddy who got a $100 dual suspension bike
whose bearing failed in a coupled of yrs.


For that price, he was lucky to get a couple of years.

My advice is to not focus too much on what seems like comfort. Soft
saddles feel better at first, but can cause havoc once you are riding
more than a few miles at a stretch. Dual suspension seems like it will
smooth over the bumps, but it is heavy, and the suspension prevents you
from climbing well out of the saddle, so you will have more trouble on
hills. The knobby tires slow you down, without giving you that much
advantage unless you are riding in dirt and sand.

"Some bumps" suggests you want to ride on roads. Mountain bikes are
ill-suited to that. I can't imagine why you would want to jump curbs.
Avoid them, don't ride over them.

Road bikes work fine for occasional dirt paths. You might also consider
a hybrid, but again suspension has more negatives than positives.

So right now, I basically
confused with conflicting advice. It seems that big tires are the way
to gain comfort but exercise bikes don't seem to have them, and if the
bike isn't comfortable I know I won't ride it.


Your commitment to exercise should carry you through the first hurdle,
where your butt becomes conditioned to the saddle. What's really
comfortable in the long run is NOT the same as what is comfortable on
the first ride.

Don't get skinny tires, but you don't need balloon tires to be
comfortable. Road-bike sized tires with 32mm width are very
comfortable, as would be mountain-bike slicks 1 1/4" wide.

I really would like a
dual suspension, even if it's used + a little scratched.


Dual suspension, or even front suspension, is not helpful except for
rough mountain rides.

--

David L. Johnson

You will say Christ saith this and the apostles say this; but what
canst thou say?
-- George Fox.
  #7  
Old July 11th 08, 04:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
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Posts: 6,961
Default Selecting a Bike

On Jul 11, 10:16*am, "OughtFour" wrote:
"Katuzo" wrote in message

...

Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say.... When I went to the
LBS....,
When I talked to the people at
work, they ....


Never mind all that.

Test ride some bikes and see what you like.

Go to a couple of bike stores and try different machines. Including, but not
limited to, what they recommend. Tell them you don;t know what you like and
are there to find out.

After a short while you'll be able to say things like, This one was very
comfortable but hard to ride uphill, and learn from the LBS what the
tradeoffs are.

Your experience is the best teacher.


This makes sense to me.

A couple years ago, I advised on exactly the same question for an
acquaintance (who's now a very good friend of mine). He's an
electrical engineer, and he had done what he thought of as
"considerable research" online, which was mostly visiting manufacturer
websites and reading an article here or there.

He was all set to get a bouncy comfort bike - suspension fork,
suspension seatpost, soft saddle, high handlebars - until I told him
some of the tradeoffs. He and I went shopping together.

After trying the bikes he had in mind, he ended up with a different
one entirely: a good quality, brand name, bike shop mountain bike, but
with smooth tires and no springs anywhere. It was so much better
riding that it was no contest.

Keep in mind that hopping curbs, riding even fairly rough dirt paths,
carrying loads, etc. is something that anything but the most delicate
road racing bike will handle easily. I do all that and more with my
standard road bikes.

(P.S. My friend has now moved to an old drop-bar road bike he got for
free, and he likes it even better, since its rolling resistance is
less.)

- Frank Krygowski
  #8  
Old July 11th 08, 05:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
landotter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,312
Default Selecting a Bike

On Jul 10, 11:51*pm, Katuzo wrote:
Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds).


That's a smartly specced bike for exercise, going moderately fast,
shopping, moderate touring. It has provisions for mounting all the
things you might want to add to a bike, like racks and fenders.
Comfort wise, the tires it comes with should be just perfect for
pavement and dirt road riding, but for further creature comforts,
explore handlebar and grip options, which are easily and relatively
inexpensive to change.
  #9  
Old July 11th 08, 06:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Will
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Posts: 109
Default Selecting a Bike



Katuzo wrote:

When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes...


Don't go there... Go he

http://www.bianchiusa.com/08_milano_alfine.html

or

http://www.redlinebicycles.com/adultbikes/925.html

The Milano comes in several drive train configurations. The Redline is
just a beautiful, simple machine. If it was my bike....I'd get a
dynamo hub installed. If you do get the bug, you'll want the
flexibility.
  #10  
Old July 11th 08, 08:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
bluezfolk
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Posts: 180
Default Selecting a Bike

On Jul 10, 11:51 pm, Katuzo wrote:
Doctor told me to get a bike. Consumers Reports say Giant FCR3 is good
for exercising ( I'm 57, 5'7", 170 pounds). When I went to the LBS,
and told them I wanted a bike that was also comfortable, and could
take some bumps (be easy on my butt + back), handle curbs, be fitted
with baskets and perhaps even be ridden in a campground occasionally
or a dirt path, they told me to go with something like a Giant Sedona
or a Cannondale Comfort 5 instead. When I talked to the people at
work, they all seem to like low end mountain bikes like the Iron Horse
Warrior 3, except for one buddy who got a $100 dual suspension bike
whose bearing failed in a coupled of yrs. So right now, I basically
confused with conflicting advice. It seems that big tires are the way
to gain comfort but exercise bikes don't seem to have them, and if the
bike isn't comfortable I know I won't ride it. I really would like a
dual suspension, even if it's used + a little scratched. But I really
don't know which way to really choose the style because there such a
selection of bikes out there, not like when I was a kid, it actually a
little confusing. Could you some help sorting this out.
Thanks


First thing you need to do is decide what you want a bike for. Then
decide what your price range is. Then check out several local bike
shops. A good dual suspension bike will cost more than a good front
suspension bike, cheap versions of both should be avoided. Basically
do you need a road bike, a hybrid, a comfort bike, a mountain bike
all have basic differances based on what they are built for. Then
come back and re-ask your question:-)
 




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