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Is there an updated Dynotest somewhere?



 
 
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  #91  
Old September 17th 17, 03:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,699
Default Is there an updated Dynotest somewhere?

On 2017-09-16 17:03, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/16/2017 2:34 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-16 09:28, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/16/2017 10:51 AM, Joerg wrote:


On a steep uphill I sure want my rear light as bright as it gets. On
winding uphill stretches the risk of being seen too late is highest.

Have you ever bothered to get a friend to ride your bike at night, then
observe your bike's lights and reflectors as you drove your car?

I've done things like that many times, with my family, with friends,
with bike club members. And as mentioned, I've gotten spontaneous
compliments from motorists.

All of this testing has showed that a cyclist does NOT need super-bright
lights or high tech equipment to be perfectly visible.

The modern paranoia calling for super-bright lights is silly. It's
spouted by people who haven't done simple tests.


Nonsense. I did tests. If you want to be able to pull up to 15mph on
singletrack or 25mph on a road with occasional debris on it those 1000
lumen lights are a safety feature. Because you see stuff. For
slowpokes that is, of course, a different story.


At night, I don't often hit 25 mph.



I do every time I return from a church meeting. Nasty thoroughfare sans
bike lane and I want to leave that behind me fast. So I step on it. A
friend of mine travels at that speed. I can't do that anymore, only for
a few minutes at a time. Embarrassingly I am a few years younger than he
is but after 20mins at 25mph my tongue hangs on the handlebar.


... I don't know many cyclists who do.
But when I've done it I don't recall trouble seeing adequately with my
Busch & Muller Cyo headlights.


Here, you have to see debris that fell from construction trucks and
tossed glass bottles well ahead of time. Because there is no chance to
evade those if you are just being passed by a bus.


BTW, I do have one friend who completed Paris-Brest-Paris a couple
times, over ten years ago. (He's one of the guys who finished my double
century with me.) PBP is hilly riding in dark and remote Brittany, with
lots of night riding. His lighting equipment was very, very ordinary,
and nothing at all close to 1000 lumens.

However, I note a subtle shift in the topic of conversation. Upthread
you were claiming a nighttime road cyclist needs glaring lights to _be
seen_. Now you're switching to fast-riding cyclists needing 1000 lumens
to see where they're going.

I think you'll dance around any and all topics in your effort to "prove"
that riding a bike is very, very dangerous.


No, it's both. My lights serve both purposes. At night they make my bike
appear like a small motorcycle and that has reduced the number of cases
where someone pulled out of a parking lot in front of me.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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  #92  
Old September 18th 17, 01:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,641
Default Is there an updated Dynotest somewhere?

On Sun, 17 Sep 2017 07:27:23 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-16 23:17, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 16 Sep 2017 07:46:10 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-15 19:48, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 15 Sep 2017 13:01:59 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-15 12:43, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/15/2017 2:43 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-15 11:15, Frank Krygowski wrote:


[...]

... This system is permanently mounted on the
bike, just like the corresponding components on a car. It's ready at the
flick of a switch and it's extremely reliable, requiring not even
tending to batteries.


How does it keep the lights at full brightness during a long uphill
slog? Like some of these sections:

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/5041564

The variation in brightess from, say, 6 mph to 20+ mph isn't really that
great. But more important, when a person is riding uphill slowly, they
don't need to see 1/4 mile ahead. Having a headlight that's slightly
dimmer uphill is no disadvantage.


Until the soused redneck in his dilapidated pickup truck comes tearing
along and doesn't see you in time.

But why should a "red neck" driving a pickup be soused?
any more than a bicyclist?

After all:
https://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2...eaths/?mcubz=1
Some 21 percent of autopsies for New York City bicyclists who died
within three hours of their accidents detected alcohol in the body,
according to a Department of Health and Mental Hygiene study that
examined fatal bicycling accidents in New York City from 1996 to 2005.
http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/t/pe...facts/bicycles
Among bicyclists ages 16 and older who were killed in 2015, 23 percent
had blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) at or above 0.08 percent.
http://www.bhsi.org/alcohol.htm
Blood alcohol levels were estimated from medical records, visits to
crash sites and testing of 342 passing bicyclists for breath alcohol.
At the .08 grams/deciliter level, legally drunk in most states, the
odds of a fatal or serious injury rose by 2,000 per cent. The risk
rose as alcohol rose, beginning at a 600 per cent increase if the
blood level was only .02 grams/deciliter, equivalent to one drink. The
.08 level is typically associated with four to five drinks.

Sounds like it isn't the Redneck we have to look out for it is the
drunken bicyclist.


Drunken cyclists are a problem, especially since many people resort to a
bicycle after losing their license due to DUI and then they don't really
know how to handle a bicycle in traffic.

However, I can't remember any of the hit-from-behind or
hit-from-the-front fatal accidents here reported as being caused by a
drunken cyclists. They were caused by drunken motorists, reckless ones,
aggressive ones and people fleeing from police or a crime scene in a car.

No matter, Frank can lament all day long, I know for a fact that since I
have bright lights front and back the number of close calls has
substantially dropped. So as far as lighting is concerned, mission
accomplished.


And that is largely "your problem". You have a preconceived notion and
rather then research the question to see if you can discover the truth
of the matter you simply argue from a position of ignorance. Akin to
arguing that 1 + 1 is not 2... because you don't want it to be.

You put on super bright lights and the number of close calls has
substantially dropped. And you know this.


Yes, I know this.


A divine revelation! On the Road to Damascus, one assumes?


Can you document it? Say 10 close calls a day before the bright lights
and only one since you installed them? Or "you just know that it is
so".


I have no GoPro and also no nee to document. I know what I experienced
and that's good enough for me. If you don't believe me, fine.


I see. YOU KNOW! With no evidence what so ever you just KNOW!

What is next? "The Second Coming will be next Wednesday at 12:30"?


I find it interesting that after reading all the blather here I did
make a test of it. First a week riding with no lights at all and then
a second week riding with, not one but two, bright lights on the
handle bars and two (count them), TWO of the brightest blinking red
lights I could buy on the rear.

My findings? There was no difference at all, None!


Thailand != USA


Ah! You mean that in the U.S. all those timid folks in autos are
terrified of bright lights and run away when they see one while in
Thailand those primitive folks aren't afraid at all?



And note that I was making a deliberate test of the value of lighting,
writing notes in a little book, counting on my fingers, etc.

And I might add that this was riding in Bangkok city traffic which is
usually rated as the first, or second most, chaotic traffic in the
world.
http://money.cnn.com/2017/02/20/auto...ies/index.html
Notice that the only U.S. city mentioned is Los Angeles which is rated
14th out of 15.


There are huge differences between countries. For example, in France it
was (is?) popular to drive around town at night with just the position
lights on, no low beam. Worked. Because drivers pay attention and are
use to this. Here in the US the attention of drivers has majorly changed
with the advent of smart phones. That's just how it is.


I can only assume that you are unique. That all the danger in the
universe is collectively hanging over your head.



No, I am simply using common sense. Better light = seen better. Every
traffic safety expert. Some self-proclaimed ones, however, ...


I seem to remember something you wrote that implied that the faster
one rode the safer one was, but I think Frank contested that thesis.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #93  
Old September 18th 17, 01:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,468
Default Is there an updated Dynotest somewhere?

On 9/17/2017 10:42 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-16 17:03, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/16/2017 2:34 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-16 09:28, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/16/2017 10:51 AM, Joerg wrote:


On a steep uphill I sure want my rear light as bright as it gets. On
winding uphill stretches the risk of being seen too late is highest.

Have you ever bothered to get a friend to ride your bike at night, then
observe your bike's lights and reflectors as you drove your car?

I've done things like that many times, with my family, with friends,
with bike club members. And as mentioned, I've gotten spontaneous
compliments from motorists.

All of this testing has showed that a cyclist does NOT need
super-bright
lights or high tech equipment to be perfectly visible.

The modern paranoia calling for super-bright lights is silly. It's
spouted by people who haven't done simple tests.


Nonsense. I did tests. If you want to be able to pull up to 15mph on
singletrack or 25mph on a road with occasional debris on it those 1000
lumen lights are a safety feature. Because you see stuff. For
slowpokes that is, of course, a different story.


At night, I don't often hit 25 mph.
I don't know many cyclists who do.
But when I've done it I don't recall trouble seeing adequately with my
Busch & Muller Cyo headlights.


Here, you have to see debris that fell from construction trucks and
tossed glass bottles well ahead of time. Because there is no chance to
evade those if you are just being passed by a bus.


Yes, we know. Where you ride is terribly, terribly dangerous.
Construction debris all over the roads, glass bottle everywhere! And
unlike everywhere else, cars in your area don't displace that stuff to
the side.

Or perhaps you're still riding in the gutter, where all that stuff
eventually ends up? If you could persuade yourself to at least ride in
the area of the cars' right tire track, perhaps you'd find that the
debris has been moved out of your way.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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