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Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes



 
 
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  #21  
Old September 18th 17, 04:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,589
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On Sun, 17 Sep 2017 19:45:07 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

Buy 2 seats


Ford stole my idea:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4T0UWLPhCco
https://www.google.com/patents/US9334007
Sniff...

Soon, everyone will be riding inflatable bicycles.
--
Jeff Liebermann

150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Ads
  #22  
Old September 18th 17, 04:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

Hyperlinks

https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&...el+Ohra-aho%22
  #23  
Old September 18th 17, 04:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

https://goo.gl/WJAGrb

ford ...
  #24  
Old September 18th 17, 06:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On Sunday, September 17, 2017 at 10:25:52 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 17 Sep 2017 08:26:57 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

You're most lkely SOL with nom-removable panniers. I don't
know of any bus transit that allows panniers to be left
on the bicycle.


Sacramento Regional Transit makes no specific mention of removing
panniers but does mention "bags".
https://www.sacrt.com/biking.stm
"Remove water bottles, bags, pumps and other loose items
that could fall off while the bus is in motion."

Santa Cruz METRO adds a few more items:
https://www.scmtd.com/en/riders-guide/bikes-and-buses
"Before the bus arrives, get your bike ready by removing
any oversized equipment, or loose items not permanently
attached, that might impair the Operator’s vision or
fall off the bike."
I guess(tm) that panniers might be considered "oversized equipment".

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Well, Joerg will/would say that his panniers ARE permanently attached to his bicycle. However due to the fact that most bicycle wheels are held loosely in the bus front rack, his LOADED panniers would put alot of sideways forces on the bicycle wheels when the bus is in motion.

Then again, when his wheels get bent he'll have something else to rant about.
  #25  
Old September 18th 17, 10:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

SR...freeze...your impulsive pre-emption is unwelcome....no reason to put words in another mouth.
  #26  
Old September 18th 17, 03:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 4,699
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On 2017-09-17 10:25, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Sunday, September 17, 2017 at 12:34:56 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
That would be a no-go for me so I'd have to use my car like I do
now. Especially on an MTB you can't have panniers that are just
slung over the rack. Everything must be bolted and cinched in place
or it goes flying on the trail.

Snipped

That's funny. I use my MTB to tour on really rough dirt roads and
trails in Northern Ontario and I've NEVER had to bolt my panniers to
the bike rack to keep the panniers from bouncing off. I do use an
Arno strap to secure them though. I like to be able to remove my
panniers QUICKLY if setting up camp in the rain.


The trails I use make stuff in the panniers rotate as if it was a
washing machine. My panniers can tolerate rain and I've ridden through
rain for hours on end. I like bikes to have real trunks and permanent
ones so I can just throw everything I need for the trip in there and go.
Like with the car. If your panniers leak you could consider a plastic
sheet snippet for camping, weighs nothing and folds down to almost nothing.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #27  
Old September 18th 17, 03:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 4,699
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On 2017-09-17 10:59, wrote:
DESIGN....WITH CARDBOARD TEMPLATE...an adapter plate between
permanent hooking and bag hooking that is temporary....plate can be
cut 1 piece tehn cut out for lightness

temp bag hookups made longer vertically wider hookup horizontally
prob equal performance of the OEM design as OEM maybe cost derived.


On the MTB there isn't much space below the panniers until something
interferes. Important stuff such as a brake caliper. This is because the
rear has 4" suspension travel.

Sure, I could devices some sort of disconnect behind the panniers and
reach in. However, having to disassemble part of the bike before being
able to ride public transit isn't my idea of fun. Especially since the
top part on the MTB pannier assy is also screwed down (hard) with a
sturdy Perspex plate. Then I'd rather keep using my own vehicle where I
don't have to do this.


No, placing your defining luggage on bus front is mostly an imbecilic
idea


The panniers on both bikes are Nashbar Daytrekker, somewhat modified for
bolt-down.

http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/st...2_563350_-1___

They are small and only present about 1sqft of wind impact surface. Yes,
on the road bike that could still be a concern because of the
not-so-great method they offer to secure a bike via front-wheel only. On
the MTB it would not be a problem. I have crashed with heavily loaded
panniers and the thing gets hammered along rocky trails and such. After
some serious mods in back of the bike it all behaves like a dirt bike
with side trunks. The frame is so rigid that the rear won't have a
chance to push sideways too much so there I wouldn't be concerned about
pretzeling the rim (but that only goes for the MTB).

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #28  
Old September 18th 17, 04:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,025
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On 9/17/2017 9:34 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

We don't have deals like that here but public buses have come a long way
in the last five years for our county. Light rail allows bikes inside so
no problem. Buses unfortunately not. The other challenge is that you
can't count on availability for the way back. If both racks are occupied
you are screwed, have to pedal back and be late. So I'd only use it for
the way out even though that's downhill.


Check your transit agency's policies. For ours: "When the racks are
filled, up to two bicycles will be allowed inside the bus subject to the
driver's discretion when passenger loads are light." And passenger loads
on VTA are almost always light. But for SACRT they say: "Bikes are not
allowed inside RT buses unless it is the last bus on the route that day,
and the bike carrier is full."

Caltrain is the problem. Even though all trains can hold either 72 or 80
bicycles, cyclists still get bumped, especially on the horribly misnamed
"Baby Bullet," limited stop train which fills most of the way at the
origin in San Jose or San Francisco. I get on in Sunnyvale, and I began
taking a folding bicycle to ensure access.
  #29  
Old September 18th 17, 04:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,025
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On 9/17/2017 7:54 AM, Joerg wrote:
Thinking about doing rides farther away without carting the bike there
in my car. Or riding out farther and using a bus for some of the way
back. Buses out here have racks for two bikes up front, like this:

http://www.sacbike.dreamhosters.com/...us_No_2395.jpg


Unfortunately the top-holding bar goes over the front wheel where the
emergency dynamo is on my road bike instead of over the seat. Ok, I can
remove that dynamo. However, both my road bike and my MTB are
"rear-heavy" with panniers that contain lots of water, tools and such.
Are they still safe in those racks?

The other question is, El Dorado Transit and others state to "remove
panniers and other baggage to allow safe operation of the bus". My
panniers look detachable but they are not, there is a lot of stuff
underneath that bolts and cinches them in place.


While panniers that attach with stretch cord or springs will routinely
bounce off on rough roads or trails, there are panniers that don't have
that problem. I use the defunct Kangaroo Baggs which have never fallen
off on rough terrain. They're more of a pain to put on and take off but
not terribly difficult.

Arkel has a camlock system that is secure, and they sell a retrofit kit
for other panniers, see
https://www.arkel-od.com/en/cam-lock-hook-kit-pair.html.

But if you want panniers that thieves can't easily steal, bolt-on is a
good idea I guess.
  #30  
Old September 18th 17, 05:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 4,699
Default Front bike rack on buses, heavy bikes

On 2017-09-18 08:19, sms wrote:
On 9/17/2017 7:54 AM, Joerg wrote:
Thinking about doing rides farther away without carting the bike there
in my car. Or riding out farther and using a bus for some of the way
back. Buses out here have racks for two bikes up front, like this:

http://www.sacbike.dreamhosters.com/...us_No_2395.jpg


Unfortunately the top-holding bar goes over the front wheel where the
emergency dynamo is on my road bike instead of over the seat. Ok, I
can remove that dynamo. However, both my road bike and my MTB are
"rear-heavy" with panniers that contain lots of water, tools and such.
Are they still safe in those racks?

The other question is, El Dorado Transit and others state to "remove
panniers and other baggage to allow safe operation of the bus". My
panniers look detachable but they are not, there is a lot of stuff
underneath that bolts and cinches them in place.


While panniers that attach with stretch cord or springs will routinely
bounce off on rough roads or trails, there are panniers that don't have
that problem. I use the defunct Kangaroo Baggs which have never fallen
off on rough terrain. They're more of a pain to put on and take off but
not terribly difficult.

Arkel has a camlock system that is secure, and they sell a retrofit kit
for other panniers, see
https://www.arkel-od.com/en/cam-lock-hook-kit-pair.html.


That only works if the cam has good spring action and holds with a lot
of force. Else it'll jump and rattle, and eventually fail. A whole lot
of force. The other problem is the bungee which will allow a loaded
pannier to flop and bang sideways during rough rides. On my MTB 80-90%
of miles are rough.

My panniers have four hooks and I slid in a thick Perspex plate above.
It is nicely rounded so won't chafe. Has two big M6 bolts to a home-made
rack "undercarriage". That way it cannot jump or rattle up an down. The
hooks have thick bicycle tubing over them for nice cushioning. The
bungees are not used but the panniers are solidly affixed to the
vertical struts of the racks.

On the MTB it would take tools and half an hour to assemble and
re-assemble. Not gonna happen, then I keep using my car instead of
changing to public transit.


But if you want panniers that thieves can't easily steal, bolt-on is a
good idea I guess.



They can still easily open them or slit them with a knife. This is why I
never leave the bike unattended. If a store doesn't allow me to carry
the bike inside I will shop elsewhere. This is one reason why I only buy
online at Walmart, not in stores. And only when they free-ship to the
house, no ship-to-store because they made me park the bike outside even
there.

On the road bike the battery for lights and stuff rides in the right
pannier so I'd also have to disconnect that. I was also thinking about
carrying a large drinking water container in the left pannier when I
find one with a fitting shape, with the hose tied to the top tube. That
way I wouldn't have to stop for transfers into the bottle.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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