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Strategy for winning the Paris stage of the TDF



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 9th 13, 02:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Dumbass[_2_]
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Default Strategy for winning the Paris stage of the TDF

When Kittel was interviewed after the race, he mentioned his train setting up on the left.

The Argos train indeed were on the left and leading as the came into the last curve which is less that 1 km from the finish. There is a kind of S curve that requires the bikers to make a slight left and then a slight right at the Place de Concord as they transition from Rue de Rivoli to the Champs-Elysees.

This seems to have been a planned strategy. Kittel mentioned it as if he thought it was important to the win.

Forming your train on the left seems to be a good idea. You can go on a straighter line into the last curve which shifts the course to the left. And you can perhaps get away with crowding those to your right since the notion of holding one's line is kind of ambiguous when you are going through that S curve.

Also, expending energy on that last straight-away on Rue de Rivoli to get the lead while on the left pays bonuses in allowing you to perhaps take a straighter line through the S curve. The Rue de Rivoli is the last stretch of pavement that is not cobblestone on the route, so it probably a good place for the train to put on an acceleration.
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  #2  
Old August 10th 13, 02:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
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Default Strategy for winning the Paris stage of the TDF

On Friday, August 9, 2013 6:38:36 AM UTC-7, Dumbass wrote:
When Kittel was interviewed after the race, he mentioned his train setting up on the left.



The Argos train indeed were on the left and leading as the came into the last curve which is less that 1 km from the finish. There is a kind of S curve that requires the bikers to make a slight left and then a slight right at the Place de Concord as they transition from Rue de Rivoli to the Champs-Elysees.



This seems to have been a planned strategy. Kittel mentioned it as if he thought it was important to the win.



Forming your train on the left seems to be a good idea. You can go on a straighter line into the last curve which shifts the course to the left. And you can perhaps get away with crowding those to your right since the notion of holding one's line is kind of ambiguous when you are going through that S curve.



Also, expending energy on that last straight-away on Rue de Rivoli to get the lead while on the left pays bonuses in allowing you to perhaps take a straighter line through the S curve. The Rue de Rivoli is the last stretch of pavement that is not cobblestone on the route, so it probably a good place for the train to put on an acceleration.


Dude: The Tour is, like, over!
  #3  
Old August 13th 13, 02:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
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Default Strategy for winning the Paris stage of the TDF

On Friday, August 9, 2013 9:18:09 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, August 9, 2013 6:38:36 AM UTC-7, Dumbass wrote:

When Kittel was interviewed after the race, he mentioned his train setting up on the left.








The Argos train indeed were on the left and leading as the came into the last curve which is less that 1 km from the finish. There is a kind of S curve that requires the bikers to make a slight left and then a slight right at the Place de Concord as they transition from Rue de Rivoli to the Champs-Elysees.








This seems to have been a planned strategy. Kittel mentioned it as if he thought it was important to the win.








Forming your train on the left seems to be a good idea. You can go on a straighter line into the last curve which shifts the course to the left. And you can perhaps get away with crowding those to your right since the notion of holding one's line is kind of ambiguous when you are going through that S curve.








Also, expending energy on that last straight-away on Rue de Rivoli to get the lead while on the left pays bonuses in allowing you to perhaps take a straighter line through the S curve. The Rue de Rivoli is the last stretch of pavement that is not cobblestone on the route, so it probably a good place for the train to put on an acceleration.




Dude: The Tour is, like, over!


Strategy is timeless.
 




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