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rockshox front sag



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 22nd 18, 02:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default rockshox front sag

I don't understand why there is a whole little science to this with so many YouTube videos [1]. There is the weight of the rider plus clothes etc. There is the PSI in the chamber. There is a table on the fork to help you with a reasonable value. After that, adjust up or down at discretion. What am I missing?

[1] e.g., https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYjoTM8asKA
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  #2  
Old October 22nd 18, 07:35 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default rockshox front sag

On Monday, October 22, 2018 at 3:02:11 AM UTC+2, wrote:
I don't understand why there is a whole little science to this with so many YouTube videos [1]. There is the weight of the rider plus clothes etc. There is the PSI in the chamber. There is a table on the fork to help you with a reasonable value. After that, adjust up or down at discretion. What am I missing?

[1] e.g., https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYjoTM8asKA


You are right about the sag. That is easy: about one third/forth of the total travel. Rebound speed is the difficult one.

Lou
  #3  
Old October 22nd 18, 08:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default rockshox front sag

You are right about the sag. That is easy: about one third/forth of the
total travel. Rebound speed is the difficult one.


Should be at the faster end of the spectrum in my limited experience.

If we stick to the fork, how sensitive is all this to the PSI of the front tire? The more PSI in the tire, the more you feel the damper, right?
  #4  
Old October 22nd 18, 08:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default rockshox front sag

On Monday, October 22, 2018 at 9:03:10 AM UTC+2, wrote:
You are right about the sag. That is easy: about one third/forth of the
total travel. Rebound speed is the difficult one.


Should be at the faster end of the spectrum in my limited experience.


Yes, but without bouncing up and down a couple of times. What I do/did is ride of a curb at high speed en feel/experience the difference of different settings and set it what feels the best.


If we stick to the fork, how sensitive is all this to the PSI of the front tire? The more PSI in the tire, the more you feel the damper, right?


I don't know. I think (personal opinion) that suspension got;
- too complicated,
- ridiculous expensive,
- according to the user manual ridiculous high maintenance.

so I gave up on suspension and mountain bikes and use a cross bike with a rigid fork for off road riding. Much more fun anyway.

Lou
  #5  
Old October 22nd 18, 08:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Default rockshox front sag

lou.holtman wrote:

Should be at the faster end of the spectrum
in my limited experience.


Yes, but without bouncing up and down
a couple of times. What I do/did is ride of
a curb at high speed en feel/experience the
difference of different settings and set it
what feels the best.


Good idea.

I don't know. I think (personal opinion) that
suspension got; - too complicated, -
ridiculous expensive, - according to the user
manual ridiculous high maintenance.


It isn't complicated IMO (PSI in tire, PSI in
chamber, rebound speed; plus some extras like
volume reducers at the top [linear/progressive]
and such) - just needs a lot of fiddling until
you get it right. Which is half the reward with
modern bikes!

It isn't expensive - perhaps in terms of the
technology itself (actually I have no clue),
but not in absolute terms. Everyone who has
a job in the Western world can afford an
alu-MTB with suspension. And probably lots of
other people as well.

As for the maintenance costs I don't know - but
do tell - because I only had this bike couple
of weeks and I don't have the manual. I'll grep
the web for a PDF right now, tho.

so I gave up on suspension and mountain bikes
and use a cross bike with a rigid fork for
off road riding. Much more fun anyway.


I never wanted suspension in the first place
but now that I have it obviously I'd like to
know what's going on

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #6  
Old October 23rd 18, 08:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default rockshox front sag

On Monday, October 22, 2018 at 9:35:02 PM UTC+2, Emanuel Berg wrote:
lou.holtman wrote:

Should be at the faster end of the spectrum
in my limited experience.


Yes, but without bouncing up and down
a couple of times. What I do/did is ride of
a curb at high speed en feel/experience the
difference of different settings and set it
what feels the best.


Good idea.

I don't know. I think (personal opinion) that
suspension got; - too complicated, -
ridiculous expensive, - according to the user
manual ridiculous high maintenance.


It isn't complicated IMO (PSI in tire, PSI in
chamber, rebound speed; plus some extras like
volume reducers at the top [linear/progressive]
and such) - just needs a lot of fiddling until
you get it right. Which is half the reward with
modern bikes!


Settings are only valid for certain circumstances but you always have a mix of circumstances at least I do. Hence the lock out, adaptive damping, electronics, self thinking stuff etc. etc.


It isn't expensive - perhaps in terms of the
technology itself (actually I have no clue),
but not in absolute terms. Everyone who has
a job in the Western world can afford an
alu-MTB with suspension. And probably lots of
other people as well.


https://www.bike-components.de/en/Fo...l-2019-p65104/


As for the maintenance costs I don't know - but
do tell - because I only had this bike couple
of weeks and I don't have the manual. I'll grep
the web for a PDF right now, tho.


FOX recommend service every 500 km, which is messy and quite complicated. Nobody does it of coarse so half of the high end forks don't work properly/optimal anymore.


so I gave up on suspension and mountain bikes
and use a cross bike with a rigid fork for
off road riding. Much more fun anyway.


I never wanted suspension in the first place
but now that I have it obviously I'd like to
know what's going on



Look around on youtube.

Lou

  #7  
Old October 23rd 18, 06:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default rockshox front sag

lou.holtman wrote:

Settings are only valid for certain
circumstances but you always have a mix of
circumstances at least I do.


Sure, but as for me, I'm content to aim for
some average that will work for most situation,
and then never have to be bothered with again.

Hence the lock out, adaptive damping,
electronics, self thinking stuff etc. etc.


The Rockshox I have have only lock out, the
valve, and rebound. I saw on YouTube some guy
putting in volume reducers to get progressive
suspension, but I don't know if that works for
my model, and anyway I won't bother. But yes,
I'm sure there are much more advanced dampers
out there.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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