A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Discs



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old November 19th 17, 05:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,073
Default Discs

On 11/18/2017 3:59 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/18/2017 4:17 PM, AMuzi wrote:


For events such as World Series, World Cup, Super Bowl etc
shirt vendors order large quantities of printed
merchandise with both teams. The loser brand merchandise
is donated for a charitable contribution and the
charitable contribution tax deduction. Hence the photo in
Africa. I learned about this only yesterday afternoon.


Was it on this group that someone pointed to an article on
the negative effects of such donations? I'm not sure. But
somewhere I read that an unintended consequence is the
killing of any cloth or clothing industries in the countries
that receive the donations.

Just goes to show that nothing is simple.

Somewhere I've got a photo of us with some folks in their
very remote eastern European village, the sort of place
that's sees almost no tourists and is difficult to even
drive to. One local guy is wearing an "I [heart] New York"
T-shirt.

I think the world must have been much more interesting
before it was so thoroughly westernized.


Absolutely. You are so wise.

When I was sewing and wearing dashikis in the late 1960s it
was eclectic and exotic. But an African wearing 'I ♥ NY' is
cultural appropriation.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #42  
Old November 19th 17, 05:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,073
Default Discs

On 11/19/2017 7:45 AM, wrote:
Why do t shirts have holes ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-shirt?wprov=sfla1


Because Rule 556.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #43  
Old November 19th 17, 06:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,811
Default Discs

On Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 8:16:00 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-18 18:22, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Nov 2017 07:30:41 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 17:05, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:23:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 16:09, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 15:28:13 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 13:21, Tosspot wrote:
On 16/11/17 20:38, David Scheidt wrote:
Tosspot wrote:
:Why do they have holes in them?

:Car discs don't, motorbike discs don't, aircraft discs don't. Why do
:bicycle discs have them?

Lots of high-performance car brake rotors are drilled or slotted.
Slotting is more common on better stuff, holes can crack. They serve
a couple of features. One, people think they're cool. two, they
allow the gasses that come off brake pads somewhere to go (this is a
non-issue with modern pads, but it was a problem in the dark ages).
Three, they give water somewhere to go. Four, they improve cooling
(increase surface area). five, the clean pads, and reduce wear.

Gasses off a bicycle pad? Really?

Nobody drills rims, and most[1] motorbikes, which are exposed to the
rain don't.

Because 75 kg of me at 30 kph is the same KE as 160 kph Audi at 1.5
tonnes? Nah.

Hmmm...could it be it helps to clean them? They aren't dissipating the
KE, so they don't get Eeek! hot. But surely the crud would build up in
the holes?

I'm going to order a solid one for the front and fit it in the spring
and see if it makes any difference.


If you find a place (in the US or China) that sells solid 8" or 203mm
rotors please let us know.


https://www.amazon.com/SRAM-Guide-Ul.../dp/B00XAY7CYK
or
http://www.jensonusa.com/SRAM-Guide-...te-Disc-Brake/
The SRAM brake Ultimate Brake with 950mm front discs and 1,800 rear
discs.


Quote "ROTOR SIZES: 140, 160, 170, 180, 200mm"

I've got that already. It's not solid rotors.


I assume these are for the "go fast people".


What's so special about this stuff other than very high prices?

Good Lord! It is made by SRAM and everyone knows that they build super
stuff. Some of which is even used on TdeF racing bicycles :-)


Oh, yes, right. We must bow down deeply and I should never complain
about having to pay 10x or more than my current solution. Another
confession. I use $10 T-shirts on all my rides instead of $100
technicolor Spandex.


Current solution?



I had described it more than once now: Shimano RT-66 rotors with 203mm
and Promax Decipher hydraulic brakes. Worked very nicely on a short test
ride. Wanted to do a long ride on Friday but it had rained and my wife
didn't want to see a mud-dripping MTB and rider in the garage again. So
I took the road bike out west instead. Went through almost 2ft deep
water and thanks to our wood stove the shoes are just now dry again.


... Like the hose clamps to keep the front fork bearings
from falling off?


That hose clamp works poifectly.


But more to the point $10 for a tee shirt? That is (last time I
checked the exchange rate) 330 baht for a tee shirt? Absurd, I buy
tee shirts for 100 baht each, six for 500 baht.



We can get them for that price as well. However, then the collars wear
out faster and become floppy. Also, I need 100% cotton and of good
quality. Not something super-thin that unravels at the first brush with
a blackberry bush.


Do you only ride on 80 degree days? A cotton t-shirt is probably the worst base-layer imaginable -- particularly an all cotton t-shirt.

My base layer yesterday and today is wool -- although I use polypro a lot (almost always for skiing). Poly pro is better for wet weather because it dries faster.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #44  
Old November 19th 17, 07:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,699
Default Discs

On 2017-11-19 09:13, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 8:16:00 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-18 18:22, John B. wrote:


[...]


... Like the hose clamps to keep the front fork bearings from
falling off?


That hose clamp works poifectly.


But more to the point $10 for a tee shirt? That is (last time I
checked the exchange rate) 330 baht for a tee shirt? Absurd, I
buy tee shirts for 100 baht each, six for 500 baht.



We can get them for that price as well. However, then the collars
wear out faster and become floppy. Also, I need 100% cotton and of
good quality. Not something super-thin that unravels at the first
brush with a blackberry bush.


Do you only ride on 80 degree days? A cotton t-shirt is probably the
worst base-layer imaginable -- particularly an all cotton t-shirt.


I ride in cotton T-shirts between 40F and 110F. Below 40F I carry a
lumberjack shirt in a pannier but sometimes I don't use it. Mostly for
long downhill sections because my lower back is not so great and cold
can hurt it.

Cotton really shines on hot summer days: Make it soaking wet and it'll
provide evaporative cooling for at 1/2h.

If clothing contains any sort of artifical materials (at least the ones
I tested so far) I develop skin rashes. That is one of the reasons for
not wearing a hydration pack anymore and equipping both bikes with the
same model of panniers.


My base layer yesterday and today is wool -- although I use polypro a
lot (almost always for skiing). Poly pro is better for wet weather
because it dries faster.


100% natural wool would be ok for me as well but 5-10mi into the ride
I'd start sweating profusely.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #45  
Old November 19th 17, 10:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,811
Default Discs

On Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 10:12:05 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-19 09:13, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 8:16:00 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-18 18:22, John B. wrote:


[...]


... Like the hose clamps to keep the front fork bearings from
falling off?


That hose clamp works poifectly.


But more to the point $10 for a tee shirt? That is (last time I
checked the exchange rate) 330 baht for a tee shirt? Absurd, I
buy tee shirts for 100 baht each, six for 500 baht.


We can get them for that price as well. However, then the collars
wear out faster and become floppy. Also, I need 100% cotton and of
good quality. Not something super-thin that unravels at the first
brush with a blackberry bush.


Do you only ride on 80 degree days? A cotton t-shirt is probably the
worst base-layer imaginable -- particularly an all cotton t-shirt.


I ride in cotton T-shirts between 40F and 110F. Below 40F I carry a
lumberjack shirt in a pannier but sometimes I don't use it. Mostly for
long downhill sections because my lower back is not so great and cold
can hurt it.

Cotton really shines on hot summer days: Make it soaking wet and it'll
provide evaporative cooling for at 1/2h.

If clothing contains any sort of artifical materials (at least the ones
I tested so far) I develop skin rashes. That is one of the reasons for
not wearing a hydration pack anymore and equipping both bikes with the
same model of panniers.


My base layer yesterday and today is wool -- although I use polypro a
lot (almost always for skiing). Poly pro is better for wet weather
because it dries faster.


100% natural wool would be ok for me as well but 5-10mi into the ride
I'd start sweating profusely.


Unless you have a metabolic disorder, I doubt you would be sweating that hard when its 35F or below, and if you did sweat, wool wicks a lot better than cotton -- but more importantly, wool traps air and stays warm when it is wet. As a base layer, cotton is like wearing a wet washrag.

I just did a 30 mile spin with probably 3K climbing around the West Hills in a wool base layer, a winter poly jersey and a vest -- which was a perfect mix for a 35F-ish dry day. Unzipping the vest kept me from sweating too much on the climbs, and zipping it back up kept me warm on the descents. My wool base layer got wet, but it stayed warm. I think poly would have wicked better. I also had my ear-warmer.

I think layering is an art form, particularly when it is raining, and you want to do a long ride.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #46  
Old November 19th 17, 11:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,268
Default Discs

Window poly, coarse poly, finished poly,

Poly cotton 90/50 weight matters.

The bus stops at 90 50.

When cold, army merino over poly poly ?

I go coarse poly then long sleeve window poly

Then thin fleece under a breathable $45
shell

Then I go home

Wit REI's pre solstice sale, get there first with the REI card saving 28% on 1 garage, one regarding list plus 8% on else with free shipping ... a battle with software weaselville.

Line choices as poly/hI king low to hi then bag first/2 poly choices in garage n reg

Thus, I filled 3 empty layering levels with quality poly for $60. Almost Wal

n remeber, Ima Egyptian

nice Dodge SUPER SUPER ticka ticka !
  #47  
Old November 19th 17, 11:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,268
Default Discs

\●*¿¿ my spallxhuxher is PITA

90/10.... poly.. low/hi $
  #48  
Old November 20th 17, 01:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,648
Default Discs

On Sun, 19 Nov 2017 08:15:53 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-18 18:22, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Nov 2017 07:30:41 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 17:05, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:23:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 16:09, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 15:28:13 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-16 13:21, Tosspot wrote:
On 16/11/17 20:38, David Scheidt wrote:
Tosspot wrote:
:Why do they have holes in them?

:Car discs don't, motorbike discs don't, aircraft discs don't. Why do
:bicycle discs have them?

Lots of high-performance car brake rotors are drilled or slotted.
Slotting is more common on better stuff, holes can crack. They serve
a couple of features. One, people think they're cool. two, they
allow the gasses that come off brake pads somewhere to go (this is a
non-issue with modern pads, but it was a problem in the dark ages).
Three, they give water somewhere to go. Four, they improve cooling
(increase surface area). five, the clean pads, and reduce wear.

Gasses off a bicycle pad? Really?

Nobody drills rims, and most[1] motorbikes, which are exposed to the
rain don't.

Because 75 kg of me at 30 kph is the same KE as 160 kph Audi at 1.5
tonnes? Nah.

Hmmm...could it be it helps to clean them? They aren't dissipating the
KE, so they don't get Eeek! hot. But surely the crud would build up in
the holes?

I'm going to order a solid one for the front and fit it in the spring
and see if it makes any difference.


If you find a place (in the US or China) that sells solid 8" or 203mm
rotors please let us know.


https://www.amazon.com/SRAM-Guide-Ul.../dp/B00XAY7CYK
or
http://www.jensonusa.com/SRAM-Guide-...te-Disc-Brake/
The SRAM brake Ultimate Brake with 950mm front discs and 1,800 rear
discs.


Quote "ROTOR SIZES: 140, 160, 170, 180, 200mm"

I've got that already. It's not solid rotors.


I assume these are for the "go fast people".


What's so special about this stuff other than very high prices?

Good Lord! It is made by SRAM and everyone knows that they build super
stuff. Some of which is even used on TdeF racing bicycles :-)


Oh, yes, right. We must bow down deeply and I should never complain
about having to pay 10x or more than my current solution. Another
confession. I use $10 T-shirts on all my rides instead of $100
technicolor Spandex.


Current solution?



I had described it more than once now: Shimano RT-66 rotors with 203mm
and Promax Decipher hydraulic brakes. Worked very nicely on a short test
ride. Wanted to do a long ride on Friday but it had rained and my wife
didn't want to see a mud-dripping MTB and rider in the garage again. So
I took the road bike out west instead. Went through almost 2ft deep
water and thanks to our wood stove the shoes are just now dry again.


... Like the hose clamps to keep the front fork bearings
from falling off?


That hose clamp works poifectly.


But more to the point $10 for a tee shirt? That is (last time I
checked the exchange rate) 330 baht for a tee shirt? Absurd, I buy
tee shirts for 100 baht each, six for 500 baht.



We can get them for that price as well. However, then the collars wear
out faster and become floppy. Also, I need 100% cotton and of good
quality. Not something super-thin that unravels at the first brush with
a blackberry bush.


You need to do more research. The 100% cotton are the cheap ones.

But I don't understand the demand for high quality tee shirts. after
all you have extolled us with your stories of riding with ragged
shorts and sandals but you just got to have a beautiful tee shirt to
go with the rags?

Ten dollar tee and ragged shorts and no shoes? Amazing!
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #49  
Old November 20th 17, 10:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,268
Default Discs

J has a sag wagon spraying him with water

  #50  
Old November 20th 17, 05:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,699
Default Discs

On 2017-11-19 13:21, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 10:12:05 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-19 09:13, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

My base layer yesterday and today is wool -- although I use
polypro a lot (almost always for skiing). Poly pro is better for
wet weather because it dries faster.


100% natural wool would be ok for me as well but 5-10mi into the
ride I'd start sweating profusely.


Unless you have a metabolic disorder, ...



Don't know if that means anything but my metabolism has slowed after I
started cyclibng again. Meaning that even 4000mi/year do not help with
losing weight anymore.


... I doubt you would be sweating
that hard when its 35F or below, and if you did sweat, wool wicks a
lot better than cotton -- but more importantly, wool traps air and
stays warm when it is wet. As a base layer, cotton is like wearing a
wet washrag.


At 35F not so much but yesterday it was about 50F up the hill where we
rode and on the way up the front of my T-shirt became wet. Yeah, it
feels like a wash rag when roaring down the hill later but the key
advantage is that it doesn't give me a skin rash. Artificial fibers do.


I just did a 30 mile spin with probably 3K climbing around the West
Hills in a wool base layer, a winter poly jersey and a vest -- which
was a perfect mix for a 35F-ish dry day.



With all those layers I'd have sweated so bad that it would run out from
underneath.


... Unzipping the vest kept me
from sweating too much on the climbs, and zipping it back up kept me
warm on the descents. My wool base layer got wet, but it stayed
warm. I think poly would have wicked better. I also had my
ear-warmer.


I carry a lumberjack shirt in winter. Sometimes my wife (who feels cold
when it drops anywhere below 75F) is concerned and urges me to don it
when starting the ride. A few miles later I take it off.


I think layering is an art form, particularly when it is raining, and
you want to do a long ride.


I grew up in an area where layering was considered "pamper-suffocating"
(loose translation, there is no English word for it) :-)

The extreme is a Russian couple building a house in our neighborhood
right now. "So what are you plans for heating? A wood stove?" ... "What
heating? It not get cold in this area, do not need heat". They grew up
in Siberia.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vented Discs Ben C Recumbent Biking 35 June 29th 09 02:26 AM
Cable discs Tim Hall UK 13 June 18th 09 11:56 PM
Rollo-Discs Unisykolist Unicycling 5 December 5th 08 02:34 AM
discs vs V brakes ODB Australia 31 October 23rd 06 08:37 AM
new to discs - squeeky when wet ! Steve Walton UK 6 November 21st 04 02:46 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.