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Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries



 
 
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  #41  
Old February 8th 18, 11:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,607
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2018-02-08 14:08, Ian Field wrote:


"Frank Krygowski" wrote in message
news
On 2/8/2018 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-06 18:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at all. Taking
it apart, I saw that the batteries were made in July 2015. Not too
good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They just keep
going and going and going...


Until you get to a red traffic light, to a stop sign or into a
traffic jam. The perfect spot at night to get hit by a car driver who
didn't see you because you were on the only unlit vehicle around.


Yes, Joerg, we know: "Danger! Danger!"

First, I've been riding regularly at night since roughly 1977. The
event you describe has never come close to happening to me. At a red
light or stop sign, the motorists behind me are coming to a stop
anyway; plus my bike has reflectors.


Recently found what was left of a rear-ended bicycle chucked on the
grass verge not far from traffic lights last time I went to the next town.



Out here there is usually a cross, flowers and the surviving front wheel
leaned against it.

It always amazes me how many cyclists are on roads after dusk and in
dreary weather without even a blinking light in back. Or with one where
the batteries are most likely already oozing.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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  #42  
Old February 9th 18, 12:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,607
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2018-02-07 07:22, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, February 6, 2018 at 7:16:12 PM UTC-8, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 6 Feb 2018 21:56:16 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at all.
Taking it apart, I saw that the batteries were made in July
2015. Not too good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They just
keep going and going and going...


And I doubt that your generators cost $150 ($180 with a box)
either :-)


My generator and light cost almost five times the price of my little
L&M Urban 800 all-in-one, which produces more light. Hub was $110 on
sale at Western Bikeworks (SP PD8), and the Luxos B was around $120
OTC from Clever Cycles in Portland. Throw in time for building front
wheel. I got the all in one on sale for around $45.

Now, the battery life on the Urban sucks, and forgetting to charge is
a reality -- so it's not as convenient as a dyno light, ...



That is where external batteries shine. The one on my MTB is inside a
sturdy ABS box which is bolted down in a protected location (on the
custome-made rear strut) so it can take the rock hits and occasional
crashes. The one on the road bike rides in the right pannier though
eventually that'll also get an ABS box underneath the rack. The road
bike has 8x 18650 Li-Ion, the MTB has half that. I can ride 4-5h on the
road bike with full lighting which should suffice even for longhaul
commuters. My rides are usually in that range. When I return home the
bike gets parked and plugged in. Simple, just like people with electric
vehicle do. You could have a 2nd pack at the office though I don't see
the need.

With light I mean serious light, MagicShine class. All the
self-contained flea-watt thingies I've owned and have seen so far can't
compete. The ones I owned all broke in due course when riding on rough
terrain. External battery packs are cheap at around $20. What helps to
keep them in good health for many years is not to top them off to 100%
but have the charger cut off at 90% or a little less.

I keep both bike batteries charged at all times. So yesterday when I
decided spur of the moment to use the MTB instead of the road bike all I
had to do was to transfer the toolkit and lock over to the (identical)
right pannier, hop on and head out into the wild yonder.


... but I can
switch it around between bikes. I've been switching between two
bikes for commuting lately due to mechanical issues. One bike has a
through-axle and the other doesn't, so switching dyno lights would be
impossible. I'd need a dyno hub with 15mm through axle which, on its
own, can cost as much as $200.



IMO not worth it. They probably also weigh as much as a decent external
battery.


... I would also have to get a handlebar
mount since there is no through hole on the crown of either of my
disc bikes.



Handlebar mount is better anyhow. It puts the light higher so drivers
can see you better, often even through the windows of other cars. The
only time a lower mount is better is in fog but then I'd go even lower
and mount an extra light at axle height. We don't have fog often enough
to warrant that effort.

The most impressive light was a MagicShine on steroids on the helmet of
a road bike rider. I thought a Union Pacific locomotive was coming.


... I miss that and once I get a bar mount, I'll go back to
using my Luxos B on the commuter, but I'll also use my little
flea-watt back up blinky on the bar. I think low watt flashers or
pulsing (rather than bursting flash-bulb) flashers are good in urban
bicycle and car traffic.


A blinky back-up is a good idea. Not at night though.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #43  
Old February 9th 18, 01:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,076
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 4:14:47 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 12:20, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/8/2018 2:08 PM, Joerg wrote:


Those 2.4W bulbs were a joke. My bikes (after my teenage
years) always had better lighting than that. Now it's all
LED on my bikes but the real stuff with more than 500 lumens.


For years with a Margil cover or, after a Krygowski mod with O ring, and
without a switch (always on) I have no complaints about function or
longevity. YMMV.


How much does that O-ring reduce the drag? In the old days (with a real
power bus on the bike) I often rode the first miles with the dynamo off
because of the drag. I only put it back to the wheel when the "steam
gauge needle" (remember those?) got too close to the red range.


First, the terrors of dyno drag are mostly a myth. This article deals with it:
http://www.myra-simon.com/bike/dynotest.html
"the slowing down has more to do with psychology than the actual power required
to turn it."
and
"All of the generators were easier to turn than riding up a 1 in 300 slope.
Another way of putting that is a rise of 18 feet per mile; and there's quite a
cluster of sidewall and hub-driven models around the 1/500 line, or 10 ft per
mile."

I find it odd that a guy routinely tells us weight doesn't matter to him, but is
afraid of dyno drag equivalent to riding a 1 in 300 slope.

Regarding the O-ring solution - that is, cutting a groove in the dyno drive
wheel, snapping in a suitable O-ring and running that on the rim sidewall
instead of the tire - it makes the dyno almost silent. That should greatly
reduce your psychological stress, Joerg, but it probably reduces the drag a bit,
too. The deformation and scrubbing of the contact patch between the tire and
the dyno's roller is responsible for a significant portion of dyno drag. I think
the O-ring has a lot less scrubbing and a lot less hysteresis loss.

- Frank Krygowski
  #44  
Old February 9th 18, 01:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,076
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:06:00 PM UTC-5, Ian Field wrote:
"Joerg" wrote in message
...
On 2018-02-06 18:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at all. Taking
it apart, I saw that the batteries were made in July 2015. Not too
good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They just keep
going and going and going...


Until you get to a red traffic light, to a stop sign or into a traffic
jam. The perfect spot at night to get hit by a car driver who didn't see
you because you were on the only unlit vehicle around.


AFAIK: dynamo lighting is illegal in the UK for exactly that reason.


Baloney.

From https://www.cyclinguk.org/cyclists-l...ng-regulations

"Dynamo powered lights are legal even though traditionally they have gone out when you stop (modern dynamo systems have 'standlight' technology which means that the light stays on for a while after you have stopped - another German legal requirement). In the UK it is legal to have a light turn off when you stop - which is OK so long as you stop on the left. Usually, it's much safer to stay where you are (e.g. in a stationary queue with left-turning traffic filtering up your inside), since most cars do stop for red traffic lights and those that don’t are unlikely to pay more heed to a bike lamp!

It is also worth noting that modern dynamo systems are very different to those from twenty years ago. They now use LED's as well and have far higher outputs and more advanced beam management. The hub-style dynamos (as opposed to the bottle sort which runs on the side of the tyre) have also increased their efficiency and reduced their drag considerably."

From https://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/...to-know-48568/

"Can I use dynamos instead?

Dynamo-powered lights are legal even though they stop emitting light when you stop. It’s fine from a legal standpoint so long as you stop on the left.

Many modern dynamos actually come with something called a standlight, which provides a limited amount of extra stored power even when the dynamo isn’t running."

- Frank Krygowski

  #45  
Old February 9th 18, 01:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,076
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:21:09 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 14:05, Ian Field wrote:


"Joerg" wrote in message
...
On 2018-02-06 18:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at all. Taking
it apart, I saw that the batteries were made in July 2015. Not too
good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They just keep
going and going and going...


Until you get to a red traffic light, to a stop sign or into a traffic
jam. The perfect spot at night to get hit by a car driver who didn't
see you because you were on the only unlit vehicle around.


AFAIK: dynamo lighting is illegal in the UK for exactly that reason.


All it takes is you standing in the left turn lane and some soused guy
in a hurry cutting across that area, seeing you about one second before
impact. Of course, Frank won't understand that but luckily your
lawmakers did.


Except, of course, that's all false.

- Frank Krygowski

  #46  
Old February 9th 18, 01:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2018-02-08 16:01, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 4:14:47 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 12:20, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/8/2018 2:08 PM, Joerg wrote:


Those 2.4W bulbs were a joke. My bikes (after my teenage
years) always had better lighting than that. Now it's all
LED on my bikes but the real stuff with more than 500 lumens.


For years with a Margil cover or, after a Krygowski mod with O ring, and
without a switch (always on) I have no complaints about function or
longevity. YMMV.


How much does that O-ring reduce the drag? In the old days (with a real
power bus on the bike) I often rode the first miles with the dynamo off
because of the drag. I only put it back to the wheel when the "steam
gauge needle" (remember those?) got too close to the red range.


First, the terrors of dyno drag are mostly a myth. This article deals with it:
http://www.myra-simon.com/bike/dynotest.html
"the slowing down has more to do with psychology than the actual power required
to turn it."
and
"All of the generators were easier to turn than riding up a 1 in 300 slope.
Another way of putting that is a rise of 18 feet per mile; and there's quite a
cluster of sidewall and hub-driven models around the 1/500 line, or 10 ft per
mile."


Well, take another look at your link. I routinely ride at 30km/h at
which bottle dynamos waste 15W or more. That is nothing to sneeze at.


I find it odd that a guy routinely tells us weight doesn't matter to him, but is
afraid of dyno drag equivalent to riding a 1 in 300 slope.


Hint: In the flatlands and with a nice high tire pressure weight doesn't
make much of a difference. In hilly terrain it's tougher to get uphill
but you win most of that back going back down on the other side. The
only time I feel weight is when I buy something at the brew supply place
or hardware store in the valley and then have to schlepp it up 1300ft.


Regarding the O-ring solution - that is, cutting a groove in the dyno drive
wheel, snapping in a suitable O-ring and running that on the rim sidewall
instead of the tire - it makes the dyno almost silent. That should greatly
reduce your psychological stress, Joerg, but it probably reduces the drag a bit,
too. The deformation and scrubbing of the contact patch between the tire and
the dyno's roller is responsible for a significant portion of dyno drag. I think
the O-ring has a lot less scrubbing and a lot less hysteresis loss.


Yeah, I should give that a try. Still got a dynamo on the road bike from
the days when I had NiCd batteries which didn't have the capacity of
Li-Ion. Only issue is, it's a Soubitez dynamo where the wheel is not
removable. I'd have to figure a way to grab it at its outside diameter
with a hose or something and then drive that hose with a power drill at
a speed the dynamo can stomach for a while, then hold the corner of a
file to it.

Also, my last front Gatorskin is still on there and those have
paper-thin sidewalls. I'd have to mount another tire.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #47  
Old February 9th 18, 01:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,076
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 7:24:58 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 16:01, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 4:14:47 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 12:20, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/8/2018 2:08 PM, Joerg wrote:


Those 2.4W bulbs were a joke. My bikes (after my teenage
years) always had better lighting than that. Now it's all
LED on my bikes but the real stuff with more than 500 lumens.


For years with a Margil cover or, after a Krygowski mod with O ring, and
without a switch (always on) I have no complaints about function or
longevity. YMMV.


How much does that O-ring reduce the drag? In the old days (with a real
power bus on the bike) I often rode the first miles with the dynamo off
because of the drag. I only put it back to the wheel when the "steam
gauge needle" (remember those?) got too close to the red range.


First, the terrors of dyno drag are mostly a myth. This article deals with it:
http://www.myra-simon.com/bike/dynotest.html
"the slowing down has more to do with psychology than the actual power required
to turn it."
and
"All of the generators were easier to turn than riding up a 1 in 300 slope.
Another way of putting that is a rise of 18 feet per mile; and there's quite a
cluster of sidewall and hub-driven models around the 1/500 line, or 10 ft per
mile."


Well, take another look at your link. I routinely ride at 30km/h at
which bottle dynamos waste 15W or more. That is nothing to sneeze at.


You seem to not understand the math. Is 15W nothing to sneeze at? It's the same
as climbing 18 feet in a mile.

I've related this before, but: On one solo tour, I was riding west on a deserted
flat four-lane concrete highway. I had four panniers and full camping gear, but
I was riding very well at a very consistent 20 mph.

Then I hit a bad expansion joint. It really jolted me. Worse, I heard some sort
of weird whirring noise, barely audible. And I noticed my speed had dropped
to about 19 miles per hour. Ideas like a dragging brake or a fender scraping
ran through my mind, but I could see nothing wrong.

Then I realized my bottom bracket dynamo had snapped on because of the jolt.
It was a near-perfect test of dynamo drag. Riding with it on cost me one mile
per hour. Big deal!



I find it odd that a guy routinely tells us weight doesn't matter to him, but is
afraid of dyno drag equivalent to riding a 1 in 300 slope.


Hint: In the flatlands and with a nice high tire pressure weight doesn't
make much of a difference.


So is that the only place you ride?? You give the impression of oh-so-gnarly
riding. Once again, your song changes wildly depending on your argument.

Regarding the O-ring solution - that is, cutting a groove in the dyno drive
wheel, snapping in a suitable O-ring and running that on the rim sidewall
instead of the tire - it makes the dyno almost silent. That should greatly
reduce your psychological stress, Joerg, but it probably reduces the drag a bit,
too. The deformation and scrubbing of the contact patch between the tire and
the dyno's roller is responsible for a significant portion of dyno drag. I think
the O-ring has a lot less scrubbing and a lot less hysteresis loss.


Yeah, I should give that a try. Still got a dynamo on the road bike from
the days when I had NiCd batteries which didn't have the capacity of
Li-Ion. Only issue is, it's a Soubitez dynamo where the wheel is not
removable. I'd have to figure a way to grab it at its outside diameter
with a hose or something and then drive that hose with a power drill at
a speed the dynamo can stomach for a while, then hold the corner of a
file to it.


Regarding the "speed the dynamo can stomach for a while": At 15 mph, your wheel
rotates about 180 rpm. The much smaller drive wheel on a sidewall dyno spins
about 4500 rpm or more. Your electric drill won't hurt it.

I just chucked mine in my lathe. If you don't have a lathe, perhaps try using
a drill press if its chuck is large enough. But I did remove the drive wheel
first.

Also, my last front Gatorskin is still on there and those have
paper-thin sidewalls. I'd have to mount another tire.


The point is to run the O-ring on the rim's braking surface.

- Frank Krygowski

  #48  
Old February 9th 18, 01:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,415
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/8/2018 3:08 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-07 07:01, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/7/2018 12:06 AM, Tosspot wrote:
On 07/02/18 03:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at
all. Taking it apart, I saw that the batteries were made
in July 2015. Not too good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They
just keep going and going and going...

I bet the lights don't, as he peers at a collection of
CYOs[1] and a recently defunct Flat-S. Tbf the Flat S is
around 7 years old.

[1] Not one lasted 18 months, they simply aren't waterproof
imho.


My regular glass bulb lamps go 6~8 years between bulb failure in daily
use. YMMV


Ye olde 2.4W + 0.6W with a dynamo? When riding at a good clip, meaning north of 15mph, those never lasted much longer than a month for me. Even if they didn't blow their filament right away the bulbs turned black inside and became dimmer than they were already to begin with. When I was a teenager I started equipping my bikes with what the automotive industry already understood over 100 years ago, brighter lights, a battery and charging system. Soon the German police wanted to give me a ticket for "non-standard" lighting. Luckily by that time I was a Dutch resident and they had to let me go.

Those 2.4W bulbs were a joke.


I think you missed about three generations of dynamo lighting technology.

My first dyno had a vacuum bulb. It was terrible at lighting the road,
but fine as a "be seen" light, better than the battery lights available
at the time. Yes, the bulb blackened a bit after a while. That meant the
bulb needed to be changed. And yes, it wasn't wonderful overall; but at
that time (early 1970s) I knew of no really good bike light.

My next dyno set came with a krypton bulb. It was significantly
brighter. The optics of the headlamp were also a tiny bit better. This
was better at lighting the road, but still not great. It was more than
fine for a "be seen" light. (Contrary to modern myth, it takes very
little light to be easily seen and noticed by other road users.)

Incidentally, I don't think I ever burned out a bulb with either of
those lights. But I didn't ride fast with either.

When I eventually told my bike shop friend I wanted to see better, he
sold me a Union lamp with a halogen bulb. This was my first headlamp
that actually focused the light properly on the road. (It was StVZO
compliant.) With that, I was finally able to see the road well enough
for all the riding I did. And this headlamp had two zener diodes in the
circuit, which pretty much cure the bulb-blowing problem.
(Interestingly, after years of use, one of the zeners failed. But by
then I had other headlamps to choose from as replacements.)

For a long time that was my setup but I was interested enough to do
various experiments. I played with various battery lights, both
commercial and homebrew, including a couple with external battery packs.
I decided they offered minimal practical improvement over the dyno
lights and were not worth the inconvenience. I learned that optics were
key, and I learned that some headlamps had better optics than others. I
compared dyno headlamps by mounting two of them, with a switch that
allowed either one or both to be active. And BTW, those were mostly 2.4
Watt bulbs, although I tried a 3 Watt for a while. I also learned that
some dynos produced a bit more power than others.

The experimenting ended when I bought my first Cyo. It became obvious to
me that this produced more light than I needed, so I considered the
problem solved. Later versions were even better. By now, I've had
friends with other battery lights praise my headlight, saying (for
example) "I want to ride next to Frank. His headlight is great!"

The overall point is this: The vacuum bulb headlamp someone used in
Germany in the 1970s has as much relation to current dyno light
technology as a MIFA has to a Trek Madone.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...-on-a-50-bike/



--
- Frank Krygowski
  #49  
Old February 9th 18, 02:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,843
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/8/2018 6:52 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/8/2018 3:08 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-07 07:01, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/7/2018 12:06 AM, Tosspot wrote:
On 07/02/18 03:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at
all. Taking it apart, I saw that the batteries were made
in July 2015. Not too good for it to stop working that
soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They
just keep going and going and going...

I bet the lights don't, as he peers at a collection of
CYOs[1] and a recently defunct Flat-S. Tbf the Flat S is
around 7 years old.

[1] Not one lasted 18 months, they simply aren't waterproof
imho.

My regular glass bulb lamps go 6~8 years between bulb
failure in daily
use. YMMV


Ye olde 2.4W + 0.6W with a dynamo? When riding at a good
clip, meaning north of 15mph, those never lasted much
longer than a month for me. Even if they didn't blow their
filament right away the bulbs turned black inside and
became dimmer than they were already to begin with. When I
was a teenager I started equipping my bikes with what the
automotive industry already understood over 100 years ago,
brighter lights, a battery and charging system. Soon the
German police wanted to give me a ticket for
"non-standard" lighting. Luckily by that time I was a
Dutch resident and they had to let me go.

Those 2.4W bulbs were a joke.


I think you missed about three generations of dynamo
lighting technology.

My first dyno had a vacuum bulb. It was terrible at lighting
the road, but fine as a "be seen" light, better than the
battery lights available at the time. Yes, the bulb
blackened a bit after a while. That meant the bulb needed to
be changed. And yes, it wasn't wonderful overall; but at
that time (early 1970s) I knew of no really good bike light.

My next dyno set came with a krypton bulb. It was
significantly brighter. The optics of the headlamp were also
a tiny bit better. This was better at lighting the road, but
still not great. It was more than fine for a "be seen"
light. (Contrary to modern myth, it takes very little light
to be easily seen and noticed by other road users.)

Incidentally, I don't think I ever burned out a bulb with
either of those lights. But I didn't ride fast with either.

When I eventually told my bike shop friend I wanted to see
better, he sold me a Union lamp with a halogen bulb. This
was my first headlamp that actually focused the light
properly on the road. (It was StVZO compliant.) With that, I
was finally able to see the road well enough for all the
riding I did. And this headlamp had two zener diodes in the
circuit, which pretty much cure the bulb-blowing problem.
(Interestingly, after years of use, one of the zeners
failed. But by then I had other headlamps to choose from as
replacements.)

For a long time that was my setup but I was interested
enough to do various experiments. I played with various
battery lights, both commercial and homebrew, including a
couple with external battery packs. I decided they offered
minimal practical improvement over the dyno lights and were
not worth the inconvenience. I learned that optics were key,
and I learned that some headlamps had better optics than
others. I compared dyno headlamps by mounting two of them,
with a switch that allowed either one or both to be active.
And BTW, those were mostly 2.4 Watt bulbs, although I tried
a 3 Watt for a while. I also learned that some dynos
produced a bit more power than others.

The experimenting ended when I bought my first Cyo. It
became obvious to me that this produced more light than I
needed, so I considered the problem solved. Later versions
were even better. By now, I've had friends with other
battery lights praise my headlight, saying (for example) "I
want to ride next to Frank. His headlight is great!"

The overall point is this: The vacuum bulb headlamp someone
used in Germany in the 1970s has as much relation to current
dyno light technology as a MIFA has to a Trek Madone.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...-on-a-50-bike/





Thanks for that, a good read and inspiring too.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #50  
Old February 9th 18, 03:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Thu, 8 Feb 2018 16:13:01 -0800 (PST), Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 5:21:09 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 14:05, Ian Field wrote:


"Joerg" wrote in message
...
On 2018-02-06 18:56, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/6/2018 1:52 PM, sms wrote:
My wife's Lezyne Deca 1500XXL stopped taking a charge, at all. Taking
it apart, I saw that the batteries were made in July 2015. Not too
good for it to stop working that soon.

Some of my bikes have dynamos that are 30 years old. They just keep
going and going and going...


Until you get to a red traffic light, to a stop sign or into a traffic
jam. The perfect spot at night to get hit by a car driver who didn't
see you because you were on the only unlit vehicle around.

AFAIK: dynamo lighting is illegal in the UK for exactly that reason.


All it takes is you standing in the left turn lane and some soused guy
in a hurry cutting across that area, seeing you about one second before
impact. Of course, Frank won't understand that but luckily your
lawmakers did.


Except, of course, that's all false.

- Frank Krygowski


https://www.cyclinguk.org/cyclists-l...ng-regulations
The post is dated Thursday, 19 October 2017

And states in part:
"Dynamo powered lights are legal even though traditionally they have
gone out when you stop (modern dynamo systems have 'standlight'
technology which means that the light stays on for a while after you
have stopped - another German legal requirement). In the UK it is
legal to have a light turn off when you stop."

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Yet another argument about an imagined condition.


--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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