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FOLDING BIKE



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 3rd 17, 05:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
LF
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Posts: 130
Default FOLDING BIKE

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5, wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell. Dahon design flaws can show up after a while. For example, I was surprised to find the spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7 were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress fractures dislodged the spokes. Why would the designers choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum Dahon frame also developed stress fractures. Over time, many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it. Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that are older, and held together much better.
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  #2  
Old December 3rd 17, 05:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 6,374
Default FOLDING BIKE

try odorless paint thinner thinned linseed oil applied with a art painters brush see Walmart for brushes

how's are the aluminum/steel contact areas ?


  #3  
Old December 3rd 17, 03:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,653
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 12/2/2017 11:10 PM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5, wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell. Dahon design flaws can show up after a while. For example, I was surprised to find the spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7 were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress fractures dislodged the spokes. Why would the designers choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum Dahon frame also developed stress fractures. Over time, many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it. Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that are older, and held together much better.


The Ancients actually knew something:
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/172045...-1/s-l1000.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #4  
Old December 3rd 17, 03:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,167
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 12/3/2017 12:10 AM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5, wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell. Dahon design flaws can show up after a while. For example, I was surprised to find the spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7 were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress fractures dislodged the spokes. Why would the designers choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass nipples?


I wonder if that was just a marketing decision, little different than
designing stupid-light components into an ordinary bike. There are
customers who will spend extra money for the chance to say "Look! It's
got aluminum spoke nipples!!"

I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum Dahon frame also developed stress fractures. Over time, many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it. Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that are older, and held together much better.


It occurs to me that folding bike design is much more difficult than
standard bike design. There are lots more compromises (cost vs. weight
vs. compactness vs. ride quality vs. speed of folding, etc.). There are
lots of ways of achieving the folding. Most folding bikes have much less
triangulation than standard frames, so forces and torques are
concentrated in smaller areas and potentially generate higher stresses.
And of course, different designers strive to come up with "innovative"
solutions, for market differentiation.

Also, I think designers may push limits a bit more, justifying that by
saying "People are going to carry it, so it's got to be light; and
nobody's going to ride it very far."

Our Bike Friday New World Tourists are doing fine, although I've heard
(rarely) of some big guys having trouble with cracks around the bottom
bracket hinges. But there have been more problems with Bike Friday's
more "innovative" Tikit model.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old December 3rd 17, 04:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,167
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 12/3/2017 10:49 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/2/2017 11:10 PM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5,
wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell.** Dahon design flaws can show up after a while.
For* example, I was surprised to find the spoke nipples on my
relatively high end Dahon Speed 7 were aluminum -- discovering this
only after stress fractures dislodged the spokes.* Why would the
designers choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass
nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum Dahon frame also
developed stress fractures.* Over time, many of the nuts and bolts
rusted on various parts of my bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good
when I bought it. Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes
that are older, and held together much better.


The Ancients actually knew something:
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/172045...-1/s-l1000.jpg


I'm curious about the age of that advertisement.

As I understand, during the first huge bike boom of the 1890s, steel had
the same high tech cachet as titanium or carbon fiber has today. It was
still relatively rare and pretty expensive, even if far cheaper than it
had been in (say) the 1850s.

So I wonder if the ad was from a time when they were bragging that it
was new, or from a time (kind of like today) when they were bragging
that they don't need none of that new-fangled aluminum?

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #6  
Old December 3rd 17, 04:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,653
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 12/3/2017 10:04 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 12/3/2017 10:49 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/2/2017 11:10 PM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5,
wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell. Dahon design flaws can show up
after a while. For example, I was surprised to find the
spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7
were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress
fractures dislodged the spokes. Why would the designers
choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass
nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum
Dahon frame also developed stress fractures. Over time,
many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my
bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it.
Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that
are older, and held together much better.


The Ancients actually knew something:
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/172045...-1/s-l1000.jpg


I'm curious about the age of that advertisement.

As I understand, during the first huge bike boom of the
1890s, steel had the same high tech cachet as titanium or
carbon fiber has today. It was still relatively rare and
pretty expensive, even if far cheaper than it had been in
(say) the 1850s.

So I wonder if the ad was from a time when they were
bragging that it was new, or from a time (kind of like
today) when they were bragging that they don't need none of
that new-fangled aluminum?


It was indeed touting a technological breakthrough.

The first bicycles were seamed steel tube brazed to cast
iron joints. Raleigh was first with "The All Steel Bicycle"
having developed bulge-formed steel bottom bracket shells to
go along with their pressed steel lugs and thimble crown forks.

start at 3:30 he
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqoGAXuE4eU

also
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/THIMBLE.JPG

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #7  
Old December 3rd 17, 06:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,180
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 03/12/17 17:28, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/3/2017 10:04 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 12/3/2017 10:49 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/2/2017 11:10 PM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5,
wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike



Only time will tell. Â* Dahon design flaws can show up
after a while. ForÂ* example, I was surprised to find the
spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7
were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress
fractures dislodged the spokes.Â* Why would the designers
choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass
nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum
Dahon frame also developed stress fractures.Â* Over time,
many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my
bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it.
Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that
are older, and held together much better.


The Ancients actually knew something:
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/172045...-1/s-l1000.jpg


I'm curious about the age of that advertisement.

As I understand, during the first huge bike boom of the
1890s, steel had the same high tech cachet as titanium or
carbon fiber has today. It was still relatively rare and
pretty expensive, even if far cheaper than it had been in
(say) the 1850s.

So I wonder if the ad was from a time when they were
bragging that it was new, or from a time (kind of like
today) when they were bragging that they don't need none of
that new-fangled aluminum?


It was indeed touting a technological breakthrough.

The first bicycles were seamed steel tube brazed to cast iron joints.
Raleigh was first with "The All Steel Bicycle" having developed
bulge-formed steel bottom bracket shells to go along with their pressed
steel lugs and thimble crown forks.

start at 3:30 he
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqoGAXuE4eU

also
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/THIMBLE.JPG


Where did they get commentators with those accents?!


  #8  
Old December 3rd 17, 08:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,305
Default FOLDING BIKE

On 12/2/2017 9:10 PM, LF wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:30:49 PM UTC-5, wrote:
NYT'S TRAVEL section gift list

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/gifts...t-folding-bike


Only time will tell. Dahon design flaws can show up after a while. For example, I was surprised to find the spoke nipples on my relatively high end Dahon Speed 7 were aluminum -- discovering this only after stress fractures dislodged the spokes. Why would the designers choose failure prone aluminum over the standard brass nipples? I was luckier than my friend, who's aluminum Dahon frame also developed stress fractures. Over time, many of the nuts and bolts rusted on various parts of my bike rusted. The Speed 7 looked good when I bought it. Over time, the design flaws blossomed. I have bikes that are older, and held together much better.


Dahon showed one really nice folder at Interbike in September, the Curl
i8. It's the only Dahon frame where the chain is on the inside when
folded (like the Brompton). Very pricey. They only made 500 of them. Has
a telescoping stem, like older Dahon models, but that was dropped on
newer models to reduce weight and cost.

https://dahon.com/news-story/35th-an...ble-pre-order/

The new management at Dahon is pretty clueless, following the death of
Pete Mole. When I mentioned the fact that their 35th anniversary model
had a big advantage of the chain being on the inside they had no idea
why that would be something that anyone would care about, even though
Brompton figured that out a long time ago.

I have a Dahon Speed TR 3x7 which I really like. I've had it for
probably 20 years now, and bought it when I had my folding bicycle
website and Josh Hon gave me a good deal on it (40% off MSRP). Now he's
moved on to Tern.
 




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