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  #151  
Old September 8th 18, 03:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,552
Default Bus racks

On 2018-09-08 00:48, Ned Mantei wrote:
On 07-09-18 21:43, Joerg wrote:
There are lots of people in this world who are taller than 6ft and
need large frame sizes.


For an example, at this link click on the picture of Jobst Brandt on his
bicycle:
https://www.bicycleretailer.com/nort...gadfly-dies-80


His bike looks like it has an unusually short wheel base. Mine is 102cm
and the bike frame was custom-fitted when I bought it.

I haven't tried whether it fits the bus racks, just was surprised that
it was longer than a friends 26" MTB. We were riding light rail together
and had to hold the bikes side by side in the train at either end.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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  #152  
Old September 8th 18, 03:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,552
Default Bus racks

On 2018-09-07 16:15, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 07 Sep 2018 07:49:45 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-04 16:55, John B. Slocomb wrote:



[...]

But more important the state has between $713 billion and $1.02
trillion in unfunded pension obligation, the tax base is decreasing,
since 2000, more people have left California than have arrived from
other states every year, the gasoline tax is not large enough to pay
for road building and repairs. In short, taxes will have to increase
or the state will go bankrupt.
https://californiapolicycenter.org/c...-remains-grim/


The pension boondoggle has to be curbed. That is the only solution.



You mean that a guy ought to work for twenty years and not get any
form of retirement pension?


Get a reasonable retirement. Not 90% of salary at 50 or 55.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #153  
Old September 8th 18, 03:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,552
Default Bus racks

On 2018-09-07 16:44, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sat, 08 Sep 2018 06:27:27 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

On Fri, 07 Sep 2018 10:38:05 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-07 10:20, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/7/2018 12:03 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-07 08:04, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, September 7, 2018 at 7:52:38 AM UTC-7, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-09-04 17:15, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/4/2018 6:10 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-03 16:10, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 03 Sep 2018 13:45:01 -0700, Joerg

wrote:

On 2018-09-02 16:36, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 02 Sep 2018 08:02:04 -0700, Joerg

wrote:

On 2018-09-01 21:30, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 31 Aug 2018 12:08:31 -0700 (PDT), Sir
Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 3:03:16 PM UTC-4,
Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-08-31 11:06, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 1:36:09 PM UTC-4,
Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-31 08:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 7:13:51 AM UTC-7,
Joerg wrote:
snip


[...]


[...]


(BTW, in front of my office building. I have
to dodge those
things). We also have private buses up to the
mountains for
skiing and airport shuttle buses, etc.


Those are what could be construed as
cherry-picking. What I
meant was a full blown system that includes not
so lucrative
routes all the way to Outer Podunk. A sysme
that
enables most
residents not to even have a car.

Not going to happen in a market economy. The
fares would be too
high for either local users who have to
subsidize
rural users or
for rural users who have to pay actual cost plus
ROI. There might
be a way to do this by selling losses to
investors -- running the
system as a tax shelter, but I'll let the tax
accountants figure
that one out. The bottom line is that barriers
to entry are not
that high and certainly lower than in Germany,
and if mass
transit could be done profitably in a large US
urban area by
private business, it would be. People are always
looking for a
way to make a buck. It might work elsewhere
in a
dense European
city, but it has been tried and failed here
in PDX.


The German example I brought was from an area
much
less densely
populated than Portland. AFAIK they even operate
ferries in the
system.


Germany is a comparatively small country with a
large population.
Distances are not so great there compared to many
areas of the USA.


As I wrote, I picked an example (on purpose)
from an
area that is less
densely populated than where I live now.


Again, if Germany is so gosh darn great, then why
have so many
Germans emigrated?


Because it wasn't always great and still isn't in
many aspects. One
cannot generalize. For example, public
transportation is clearly better
there but bike paths and even more so MTB trails
are
definitely not.
Before moving to the US I would have never dreamed
that bicycle
infrastructure could become better here than in
Germany but it has.
Agencies in the various contries could learn from
each other but there
is often a lack of willingness.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I wonder what would happen if to create a new
bicycling infrastructure or bus/rail link that would
benefit mainly bicyclists, if bicyclists were told
they alone would have to pay for it?

Cheers

Many years ago Riverside, California attempted to
"register" bicycles.
The idea was to have a record of who owned what
bicycle which they
hoped might reduce bicycle theft.

If I remember correctly it cost the owner 50 cents
and
he got a nice
little "number plate" to attach to his bicycle.

You never heard as much moaning and groaning, "You
mean I gotta pay 50
cents to ride a bicycle." The city gave up on the
scheme. Apparently
cyclists are cheap.


I doubt that, and they should not make it mandatory
anyhow. If they made
it mandatory then Californians can already smell it
that pretty soon the
authorities would start to tax bicycles per year and
they don't want
that. If there is any way to extract yet another tax
from the people CA
will eventually do that.

But if you don't pay your taxes who is going to support
the homeless,
and the illegal immigrants, and the bike paths and,
and,
and.

If you are going to have socialism someone's got to pay
for it.


We already pay among the highest taxes in the country.
That's enough taxes.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


I see, you want bike paths, racks on buses, and all the
other free
goodies provided by the state, but you don't want to pay
for them.


See above. We already paid for them.

[...]


You California taxpayers paid for extravagant pensions,
the $80billion
choo choo which doesn't run, homeless, welfare and
illegal services,
fire fighting of forests which should have been logged
and so on.


That's the price for a leftist government. Like it always
end up.

And yet you expect the government to provide you with
special bike racks on buses.


No, bike racks that actually work with contemporary bikes
that are commonly used in this area. Just like we now have
roads that accommodate vehicles wider than a Ford Model T.
It's that simple.

[...]


Every other government program is profligate and counterproductive so
why should bike racks on buses be any different?


Maybe so but that does require us to speak up. As taxpayers we have a
stake in this, our money is in this and, therefore, we have a say in
this. I can't understand people who think otherwise.



If the"US" you mention is bicycle riders then it is approximately 1%
of the population. Why do you feel that this minority should dictate
anything?



Think: For whom are bike racks on buses meant? For the other 99% that
don't use bikes?


But if you do it might be noted that homeless amount to
about 1.2 percent of the California. Do they get to dictate to the
state also?



Right now it sure feels like it. Probably not much different where Jay
lives.


https://cal.streetsblog.org/2016/03/...uting-by-bike/



Correction. Homeless in California are about 0.5% of the population.


And they are trashing the place.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #154  
Old September 8th 18, 03:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,552
Default Bus racks

On 2018-09-07 16:38, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 07 Sep 2018 12:42:17 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-07 12:18, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/7/2018 1:03 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-07 08:04, jbeattie wrote:

And yet you expect the government to provide you with special bike
racks on buses.


No, bike racks that actually work with contemporary bikes that are
commonly used in this area. Just like we now have roads that
accommodate vehicles wider than a Ford Model T. It's that simple.

I've seen no evidence except your assertions for the idea that your
style of bike is common among those who use buses. I rarely trust your
assertions. So do you have any evidence?


If you had followed the bike market at least a little you could have
answered that question yourself:

https://www.bicycleretailer.com/stud...egories-stores

Quote "Twenty-niners now account for 41 percent of dollars sold in
mountain bikes at IBDs".


And regarding roads and Model Ts: ISTM your situation is like that of a
1930s guy who built or bought something on this style
https://www.cycleworld.com/2014/07/2...specifications

then complained the roads weren't suitable for its use.

Don't buy something out of spec for the infrastructure you want to use,
then complain about the infrastructure.


You don't seem to even know what spec is these days. Hint: We are in the
21st century now.

Yesterday I rode light rail back to where our truck was parked. My old
1982 road bike was riding next to a 26" of a friend which would barely
fit the bus rack. My road bike is longer! Any questions? Luckily light
rail allows to take bikes on board so it doesn't matter.


Hmmm... the last you wrote you owned two vehicles one a new (to you)
SUV and you had passed your old car on to your wife.



Where do you dream up all those stories? My wife and I bought our cars
around the same time 20-some years ago. Nothing was handed down. She has
a compact car (Toyota) because she like that. I have a small SUV but
that only holds one bike so if a friend comes along we either need a
truck or two cars.


... Now you mention a truck? You mean that you have purchased
a truck just to haul your oversized bicycle around?

Apparently you are flush with cash if you have a new truck... so three
vehicles for a 2 person family is correct but ask you to contribute to
the common good by paying taxes and you fall down on the floor and
kick your feet and scream.


Believe it or not but besides my wife and I there are about 20,000 other
people living in our community. Lo and behold they have motor vehicles
as well and ... drum roll ... some even ride bicycles. One of them
happens to own a pickup truck.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #155  
Old September 8th 18, 04:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,335
Default Bus racks

On 9/8/2018 8:58 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/7/2018 8:12 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 7 Sep 2018 20:24:42 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 9/7/2018 7:42 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 7 Sep 2018 19:21:20 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 9/7/2018 5:40 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/7/2018 2:18 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/7/2018 1:03 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-07 08:04, jbeattie wrote:

And yet you expect the government to provide you with
special bike racks on buses.


No, bike racks that actually work with contemporary bikes
that are commonly used in this area. Just like we now have
roads that accommodate vehicles wider than a Ford Model T.
It's that simple.

I've seen no evidence except your assertions for the idea
that your style of bike is common among those who use buses.
I rarely trust your assertions. So do you have any evidence?

And regarding roads and Model Ts: ISTM your situation is
like that of a 1930s guy who built or bought something on
this style
https://www.cycleworld.com/2014/07/2...specifications



then complained the roads weren't suitable for its use.

Don't buy something out of spec for the infrastructure you
want to use, then complain about the infrastructure.


Roads not suitable to that ugly 3 wheel monstrosity? How so? I see
them
(and copies) all summer around here.

But not in the 1930s, as I said.

I was alive in the 1930's and I can assure you that the two lane
blacktop roads in New Hampshire (at least) would accommodate a three
wheel motorcycle... at least the three wheel Harley's that the Police
had would fit.

I don't doubt that. But I said "something on this style."
https://www.cycleworld.com/2014/07/2...specifications


For more specifics, that Polaris is wider than a Corvette, with a 69
inch front track measurement. And the ground clearance is just over 5
inches, with a 105" wheelbase. And it requires three decently smooth
tracks in the road, not just two.

The currently made, as of 2012, Morgan 3 wheeler is 128" long, 68
inches wide and has a ground clearance of 4.5 inches.
https://www.morgan-motor.co.uk/3-wheeler/

Imagine trying to drive that on a typical 1930s country road.
http://www.dcnyhistory.org/Fact_Fancy/images/6.07.jpg

(BTW, why is the Polaris driver wearing a helmet? Does he think it will
tip over?)


Modern Morgans are powered by engines built near me in Viola WI.


Really? Wow.

I wonder how the tariff battles will affect that.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #156  
Old September 8th 18, 05:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,335
Default Bus racks

On 9/8/2018 10:12 AM, Joerg wrote:
I have a small SUV but
that only holds one bike so if a friend comes along we either need a
truck or two cars.


Why on earth can you not carry more than one bike with a small SUV?

In 1985 we bought a new Honda Civic station wagon. That's a very tiny
car. Yet a year later we drove that car to California and back, towing a
tiny camping trailer and carrying three bikes. Two (including the
tandem) were on the roof and one was on the rear rack.

In 2004 we bought a Pontiac Vibe. I could carry our two touring bikes
vertically _inside_ the car by removing the front wheels and using two
of those floor-mount front fork clamps. I also had to remove my
seatpost, but my wife's bike fit without that bother. If I wanted to add
the roof rack and rear rack, I could carry up to seven bikes.

You seem to have SO many problems that others easily solve!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #157  
Old September 8th 18, 05:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,552
Default Bus racks

On 2018-09-08 09:00, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2018 10:12 AM, Joerg wrote:
I have a small SUV but that only holds one bike so if a friend comes
along we either need a truck or two cars.


Why on earth can you not carry more than one bike with a small SUV?


You need a receiver plus an outside bike rack, neither of which I have.
I can get one bike inside but laying another on top of it is out because
the lifting aggravates my back pain and it can smash stuff on the bikes,
such as derailers.



In 1985 we bought a new Honda Civic station wagon. That's a very tiny
car. Yet a year later we drove that car to California and back, towing a
tiny camping trailer and carrying three bikes. Two (including the
tandem) were on the roof and one was on the rear rack.


Don't have a roof or rear rack, and no receiver.


In 2004 we bought a Pontiac Vibe. I could carry our two touring bikes
vertically _inside_ the car by removing the front wheels and using two
of those floor-mount front fork clamps. I also had to remove my
seatpost, but my wife's bike fit without that bother. If I wanted to add
the roof rack and rear rack, I could carry up to seven bikes.

You seem to have SO many problems that others easily solve!


I am likely a lot taller than you because the Mitsubishi Montero Sport
will not allow any of my bikes to sit vertically inside. My wife's, yes,
but not mine. Shrinking a foot in height is obviously not an easy solution.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #158  
Old September 8th 18, 08:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,078
Default Bus racks

jbeattie writes:

On Friday, September 7, 2018 at 7:52:38 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-04 17:15, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/4/2018 6:10 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-03 16:10, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 03 Sep 2018 13:45:01 -0700, Joerg

wrote:

On 2018-09-02 16:36, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 02 Sep 2018 08:02:04 -0700, Joerg

wrote:


[ ... ]

But if you don't pay your taxes who is going to support
the homeless,
and the illegal immigrants, and the bike paths and, and,
and.

If you are going to have socialism someone's got to pay
for it.


We already pay among the highest taxes in the country.
That's enough taxes.

I see, you want bike paths, racks on buses, and all the
other free
goodies provided by the state, but you don't want to pay
for them.


See above. We already paid for them.

[...]


You California taxpayers paid for extravagant pensions, the $80billion
choo choo which doesn't run, homeless, welfare and illegal services,
fire fighting of forests which should have been logged and so on.



That's the price for a leftist government. Like it always end up.


And yet you expect the government to provide you with special bike
racks on buses. Well, I want a PONY! Why aren't my
much-larger-than-yours taxes providing me with a PONY! If government
spent less money on PERS and more on PONIES, we would all be better
off. I would also like bicycle-only facilities from my driveway to
work that are swept twice a day. Other demands are forthcoming.


You make it sound so simple. My town just instituted loaner PONIES for
all residents, and, although I'm normally a fiscal conservative I was
all in favor. Naturallly, I tried one out shortly after they were
available. Sadly I found much still to be desired.

Firstly, the PONY was much too short for a person of my stature, indeed,
my feet nearly dragged the ground. Also, in spite of his short legs,
this PONY had such long ears that I had a hard time seeing in front of
me -- an obvious safety hazard. I hoped the PONY might make up this
with a turn of speed, so I applied the crop (not town-supplied, a major
procurement faux pas, I had to requisition a piece of disused garden
hose). The PONY did not gallop, nor did he even trot, he just made the
sort of noises you might expect from a Hell demon on open mike night.

Not long into the ride we were passed by a young lady on what appeared
to be a much higher quality, private PONY, nicely proportioned, with a
curly blonde mane and a tasteful little horn in the middle of her
forehead, just like the PONIES I remember from the old country. On
seeing this, my municipal PONY perked right up, he cantered, he capered,
he continued to make horrible noises. And, regrettably, his stud tackle
grew to the point that I was afraid he might step on it (no wonder they
called him "starfish" at the stables).

I found this so embarrassing and inappropriate that I was tempted to
ditch the PONY like a San Jose dockless scooter, but, since I was raised
responsibly I whipped him right back in the other direction and turned
him in.

There you have it, yet another example of incompetent government letting
us down.

--
  #159  
Old September 9th 18, 12:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Bus racks

On Sat, 08 Sep 2018 07:02:53 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-07 16:15, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 07 Sep 2018 07:49:45 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-04 16:55, John B. Slocomb wrote:



[...]

But more important the state has between $713 billion and $1.02
trillion in unfunded pension obligation, the tax base is decreasing,
since 2000, more people have left California than have arrived from
other states every year, the gasoline tax is not large enough to pay
for road building and repairs. In short, taxes will have to increase
or the state will go bankrupt.
https://californiapolicycenter.org/c...-remains-grim/


The pension boondoggle has to be curbed. That is the only solution.



You mean that a guy ought to work for twenty years and not get any
form of retirement pension?


Get a reasonable retirement. Not 90% of salary at 50 or 55.


Why ever not? While I did retire after 20 years in the A.F. with a 50%
of salary retirement pay had I stayed until 50 years of age I'd have
received 75%.

But more to the point, the retirement pay problem that California
faces is not the fault of the retirees who entered into a contract
with the state possible 20 or 30 years ago and now are being paid a
retirement that was specified in their contracts. The fault lies with
the state that certainly should have been able to foresee what their
liabilities would be in 5, 10, 20 years and did nothing about it.

But what is the solution? It appears that there are two options, (1)
renege on the contracts that the state offered to individuals who they
employed, which would probably result in a mammoth class action suit
against the state in which I suggest that any reasonable court would
support the retirees; or (2) increase State income, probably by
increasing taxes.
  #160  
Old September 9th 18, 12:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Bus racks

On Sat, 08 Sep 2018 07:07:29 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-07 16:44, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sat, 08 Sep 2018 06:27:27 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

On Fri, 07 Sep 2018 10:38:05 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-09-07 10:20, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/7/2018 12:03 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-07 08:04, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, September 7, 2018 at 7:52:38 AM UTC-7, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-09-04 17:15, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/4/2018 6:10 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-03 16:10, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 03 Sep 2018 13:45:01 -0700, Joerg

wrote:

On 2018-09-02 16:36, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 02 Sep 2018 08:02:04 -0700, Joerg

wrote:

On 2018-09-01 21:30, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 31 Aug 2018 12:08:31 -0700 (PDT), Sir
Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 3:03:16 PM UTC-4,
Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-08-31 11:06, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 1:36:09 PM UTC-4,
Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-31 08:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, August 31, 2018 at 7:13:51 AM UTC-7,
Joerg wrote:
snip


[...]


[...]


(BTW, in front of my office building. I have
to dodge those
things). We also have private buses up to the
mountains for
skiing and airport shuttle buses, etc.


Those are what could be construed as
cherry-picking. What I
meant was a full blown system that includes not
so lucrative
routes all the way to Outer Podunk. A sysme
that
enables most
residents not to even have a car.

Not going to happen in a market economy. The
fares would be too
high for either local users who have to
subsidize
rural users or
for rural users who have to pay actual cost plus
ROI. There might
be a way to do this by selling losses to
investors -- running the
system as a tax shelter, but I'll let the tax
accountants figure
that one out. The bottom line is that barriers
to entry are not
that high and certainly lower than in Germany,
and if mass
transit could be done profitably in a large US
urban area by
private business, it would be. People are always
looking for a
way to make a buck. It might work elsewhere
in a
dense European
city, but it has been tried and failed here
in PDX.


The German example I brought was from an area
much
less densely
populated than Portland. AFAIK they even operate
ferries in the
system.


Germany is a comparatively small country with a
large population.
Distances are not so great there compared to many
areas of the USA.


As I wrote, I picked an example (on purpose)
from an
area that is less
densely populated than where I live now.


Again, if Germany is so gosh darn great, then why
have so many
Germans emigrated?


Because it wasn't always great and still isn't in
many aspects. One
cannot generalize. For example, public
transportation is clearly better
there but bike paths and even more so MTB trails
are
definitely not.
Before moving to the US I would have never dreamed
that bicycle
infrastructure could become better here than in
Germany but it has.
Agencies in the various contries could learn from
each other but there
is often a lack of willingness.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I wonder what would happen if to create a new
bicycling infrastructure or bus/rail link that would
benefit mainly bicyclists, if bicyclists were told
they alone would have to pay for it?

Cheers

Many years ago Riverside, California attempted to
"register" bicycles.
The idea was to have a record of who owned what
bicycle which they
hoped might reduce bicycle theft.

If I remember correctly it cost the owner 50 cents
and
he got a nice
little "number plate" to attach to his bicycle.

You never heard as much moaning and groaning, "You
mean I gotta pay 50
cents to ride a bicycle." The city gave up on the
scheme. Apparently
cyclists are cheap.


I doubt that, and they should not make it mandatory
anyhow. If they made
it mandatory then Californians can already smell it
that pretty soon the
authorities would start to tax bicycles per year and
they don't want
that. If there is any way to extract yet another tax
from the people CA
will eventually do that.

But if you don't pay your taxes who is going to support
the homeless,
and the illegal immigrants, and the bike paths and,
and,
and.

If you are going to have socialism someone's got to pay
for it.


We already pay among the highest taxes in the country.
That's enough taxes.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


I see, you want bike paths, racks on buses, and all the
other free
goodies provided by the state, but you don't want to pay
for them.


See above. We already paid for them.

[...]


You California taxpayers paid for extravagant pensions,
the $80billion
choo choo which doesn't run, homeless, welfare and
illegal services,
fire fighting of forests which should have been logged
and so on.


That's the price for a leftist government. Like it always
end up.

And yet you expect the government to provide you with
special bike racks on buses.


No, bike racks that actually work with contemporary bikes
that are commonly used in this area. Just like we now have
roads that accommodate vehicles wider than a Ford Model T.
It's that simple.

[...]


Every other government program is profligate and counterproductive so
why should bike racks on buses be any different?


Maybe so but that does require us to speak up. As taxpayers we have a
stake in this, our money is in this and, therefore, we have a say in
this. I can't understand people who think otherwise.


If the"US" you mention is bicycle riders then it is approximately 1%
of the population. Why do you feel that this minority should dictate
anything?



Think: For whom are bike racks on buses meant? For the other 99% that
don't use bikes?


But if you do it might be noted that homeless amount to
about 1.2 percent of the California. Do they get to dictate to the
state also?



Right now it sure feels like it. Probably not much different where Jay
lives.


https://cal.streetsblog.org/2016/03/...uting-by-bike/



Correction. Homeless in California are about 0.5% of the population.


And they are trashing the place.


Yes, and I have read that approximately 10% of the employed labor
force in California is made up of illegal immigrants but you don't
seem to have jobs for your citizens.
 




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