A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

{Politics so we don't have to change the subject.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old October 21st 20, 01:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,154
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:59:46 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 11:48:43 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 7:54:29 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote to Andrew Muzi:

You run a business. When bikes are selling like hotcakes, you don't drop the price. You sell your stock and bank the money for hard times -- maybe pay down your credit line or long term debt. You don't run a sale.


That's why you're a lawyer, and outsider looking in, Jay, why no one has ever hunted your handsome head to set up a business or even to run an established business. An entrepreneur in circumstances such as you describe, if he has a bit of capital or can borrow it, will run the biggest sale he ever ran, and buy all the stock he can, even if he has to pay premium prices and sell it below cost, and when the crisis is over, he may be in debt but his competitors will be out of business and his new market will be much, much larger, and he'll be able to attract investment because he'll be the only guy in his business standing up. You must have been skiving off the day they taught Schumpeter and entrepreneurialism in Economics 1899. Or were all the lecturers at your college already Marxists in your time? The problem with Marxism in a capitalist world is that dear old Karl thought of economics as a science, with one sure answer, like engineering. It isn't. It's a game for high rollers, risk takers.

-- Jay Beattie.


Yeah, you're the one I'm talking to.

Andre Jute
The art is discovering the unit above and the unit below the unit at which the marginal cost meets the marginal income. That takes a lot of skill, but some can substitute luck; luck too is a talent.

Right. Let's take your scenario: Andrew drops prices, sells below cost, runs up huge debt to cover rent, payroll, cost of goods. He ends up with a massive debt-load. This assumes he can even find a lender (other than a CARES Act lender) willing to finance him as he inches towards bankruptcy. He's probably using credit cards or hard-money lenders because no bank is willing to take the risk after he's blown through his credit line or other existing facility, so its a nasty, high interest debt. And as a single shop, he's still not moving enough product to get the best pricing and good or any financing from his distributors.

And lets assume the the Red Jersey down the street can't beat Andrew's prices and shuts the doors. Andrew gets thirty-block market dominance for six months until the Green Jersey opens (selling ebikes and not classic Campagnolo), mostly debt-free. It's a low bar to market entrance. Meanwhile, after the market cools, Andrew has to raise prices to cover debt -- fire employees, move to smaller space, etc., etc. He goes out of business.

The more likely scenario is that the Yellow Jersey and the Red Jersey both make a bundle in the COVID market selling somewhat different products, pay down debt, build reserves, and when demand drops -- then they start price cutting at a time when stock is plentiful -- maybe run an annual sale, put on a bike fair, run an ad. They go back to the usual competition against cost-cutting internet sellers.

In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary world, nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering the market.

-- Jay Beattie.


Have you ever been inside a Walmart or any other supermarket, Jay? How do your think they, or any other chain, got to dominate a market? How do you think Coca-Cola nearly succeeded in bankrupting Pepsi? How do you think any mom and pop store in one generation becomes a universal chain in the third or fourth generation? How do you get a driving license if your eyes are forever closed? What is the sound of one hand clapping? Just checking that you're paying attention.

Andre Jute
An economist is Janus-like. To government he is the enemy of oligopoly, purely on principle. To his corporate clients, he is a fount of practical wisdom on driving (almost all) their competitors out of business.
Ads
  #22  
Old October 21st 20, 01:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,513
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Tue, 20 Oct 2020 21:32:53 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Tue, 20 Oct 2020 08:10:39 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:21:43 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 19 Oct 2020 08:43:09 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:


In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary
world,
nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the
key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger
business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that
price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering
the market.

So what is this business you say that you ran for which you had to
pay the employers share of social security and Medicare which
therefore makes all of your retired employees welfare scum?
Legal firms/partnerships are a business. A hard business as it can be a
long time between drinks(work) from customers. Very much word of mouth.


Tell us what you know about American law and how you learned it.


What does "American Law" have to do with it?
This is an international newsgroup and both our law systems have a common
root. For the finer details, I can read and COMPREHEND what is posted.

I am
beginning to believe Andre about your false identity.


No sweat sherlock or do you really think my parents called me Newsy.
OTOH, he is one of your kind; uneducated and spewing a torrent of abuse
in a desperate attempt to cover up for failure to learn during his
lifetime.

Yawn. Tom, take your dried frog pills.


Goodness! Are "dried frog pills" a treatment for the "feeble minded"
in Australia?
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #23  
Old October 21st 20, 04:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,227
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Tuesday, October 20, 2020 at 5:46:34 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:59:46 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 11:48:43 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 7:54:29 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote to Andrew Muzi:

You run a business. When bikes are selling like hotcakes, you don't drop the price. You sell your stock and bank the money for hard times -- maybe pay down your credit line or long term debt. You don't run a sale.

That's why you're a lawyer, and outsider looking in, Jay, why no one has ever hunted your handsome head to set up a business or even to run an established business. An entrepreneur in circumstances such as you describe, if he has a bit of capital or can borrow it, will run the biggest sale he ever ran, and buy all the stock he can, even if he has to pay premium prices and sell it below cost, and when the crisis is over, he may be in debt but his competitors will be out of business and his new market will be much, much larger, and he'll be able to attract investment because he'll be the only guy in his business standing up. You must have been skiving off the day they taught Schumpeter and entrepreneurialism in Economics 1899. Or were all the lecturers at your college already Marxists in your time? The problem with Marxism in a capitalist world is that dear old Karl thought of economics as a science, with one sure answer, like engineering. It isn't. It's a game for high rollers, risk takers.

-- Jay Beattie.

Yeah, you're the one I'm talking to.

Andre Jute
The art is discovering the unit above and the unit below the unit at which the marginal cost meets the marginal income. That takes a lot of skill, but some can substitute luck; luck too is a talent.

Right. Let's take your scenario: Andrew drops prices, sells below cost, runs up huge debt to cover rent, payroll, cost of goods. He ends up with a massive debt-load. This assumes he can even find a lender (other than a CARES Act lender) willing to finance him as he inches towards bankruptcy. He's probably using credit cards or hard-money lenders because no bank is willing to take the risk after he's blown through his credit line or other existing facility, so its a nasty, high interest debt. And as a single shop, he's still not moving enough product to get the best pricing and good or any financing from his distributors.

And lets assume the the Red Jersey down the street can't beat Andrew's prices and shuts the doors. Andrew gets thirty-block market dominance for six months until the Green Jersey opens (selling ebikes and not classic Campagnolo), mostly debt-free. It's a low bar to market entrance. Meanwhile, after the market cools, Andrew has to raise prices to cover debt -- fire employees, move to smaller space, etc., etc. He goes out of business.

The more likely scenario is that the Yellow Jersey and the Red Jersey both make a bundle in the COVID market selling somewhat different products, pay down debt, build reserves, and when demand drops -- then they start price cutting at a time when stock is plentiful -- maybe run an annual sale, put on a bike fair, run an ad. They go back to the usual competition against cost-cutting internet sellers.

In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary world, nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering the market.

-- Jay Beattie.


Have you ever been inside a Walmart or any other supermarket, Jay? How do your think they, or any other chain, got to dominate a market? How do you think Coca-Cola nearly succeeded in bankrupting Pepsi? How do you think any mom and pop store in one generation becomes a universal chain in the third or fourth generation? How do you get a driving license if your eyes are forever closed? What is the sound of one hand clapping? Just checking that you're paying attention.

Andre Jute
An economist is Janus-like. To government he is the enemy of oligopoly, purely on principle. To his corporate clients, he is a fount of practical wisdom on driving (almost all) their competitors out of business.


O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.





  #24  
Old October 21st 20, 07:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,154
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 4:01:18 AM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
IPO


See, when I prod you a little, suddenly you know what I'm talking about.

If Muzi suddenly requires the advice of either of us, that will be adequate proof that he's gone prematurely senile. He tells you in his sig, every day, several times on some days, that he's survived near enough 50 years in a competitive business. He also tells you how he did it, by unrelenting customer service. What exactly do you think a couple of skyscraper corner office slacksters with clean hands can teach him about doing business at pavement-level? Go on, we can all do with a giggle.

Andre Jute
"A man must know his limits" -- scriptwriter of Ditrty Harry Callahan
  #25  
Old October 21st 20, 01:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,410
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On 10/20/2020 10:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, October 20, 2020 at 5:46:34 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:59:46 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 11:48:43 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 7:54:29 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote to Andrew Muzi:

You run a business. When bikes are selling like hotcakes, you don't drop the price. You sell your stock and bank the money for hard times -- maybe pay down your credit line or long term debt. You don't run a sale.

That's why you're a lawyer, and outsider looking in, Jay, why no one has ever hunted your handsome head to set up a business or even to run an established business. An entrepreneur in circumstances such as you describe, if he has a bit of capital or can borrow it, will run the biggest sale he ever ran, and buy all the stock he can, even if he has to pay premium prices and sell it below cost, and when the crisis is over, he may be in debt but his competitors will be out of business and his new market will be much, much larger, and he'll be able to attract investment because he'll be the only guy in his business standing up. You must have been skiving off the day they taught Schumpeter and entrepreneurialism in Economics 1899. Or were all the lecturers at your college already Marxists in your time? The problem with Marxism in a capitalist world is that dear old Karl thought of economics as a science, with one sure answer, like engineering. It isn't. It's a game for high rollers,

risk takers.

-- Jay Beattie.

Yeah, you're the one I'm talking to.

Andre Jute
The art is discovering the unit above and the unit below the unit at which the marginal cost meets the marginal income. That takes a lot of skill, but some can substitute luck; luck too is a talent.
Right. Let's take your scenario: Andrew drops prices, sells below cost, runs up huge debt to cover rent, payroll, cost of goods. He ends up with a massive debt-load. This assumes he can even find a lender (other than a CARES Act lender) willing to finance him as he inches towards bankruptcy. He's probably using credit cards or hard-money lenders because no bank is willing to take the risk after he's blown through his credit line or other existing facility, so its a nasty, high interest debt. And as a single shop, he's still not moving enough product to get the best pricing and good or any financing from his distributors.

And lets assume the the Red Jersey down the street can't beat Andrew's prices and shuts the doors. Andrew gets thirty-block market dominance for six months until the Green Jersey opens (selling ebikes and not classic Campagnolo), mostly debt-free. It's a low bar to market entrance. Meanwhile, after the market cools, Andrew has to raise prices to cover debt -- fire employees, move to smaller space, etc., etc. He goes out of business.

The more likely scenario is that the Yellow Jersey and the Red Jersey both make a bundle in the COVID market selling somewhat different products, pay down debt, build reserves, and when demand drops -- then they start price cutting at a time when stock is plentiful -- maybe run an annual sale, put on a bike fair, run an ad. They go back to the usual competition against cost-cutting internet sellers.

In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary world, nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering the market.

-- Jay Beattie.


Have you ever been inside a Walmart or any other supermarket, Jay? How do your think they, or any other chain, got to dominate a market? How do you think Coca-Cola nearly succeeded in bankrupting Pepsi? How do you think any mom and pop store in one generation becomes a universal chain in the third or fourth generation? How do you get a driving license if your eyes are forever closed? What is the sound of one hand clapping? Just checking that you're paying attention.

Andre Jute
An economist is Janus-like. To government he is the enemy of oligopoly, purely on principle. To his corporate clients, he is a fount of practical wisdom on driving (almost all) their competitors out of business.


O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.






No thanks. My old departed friend Bill Quinn literally wrote
the book on that 25 years ago:

https://www.alibris.com/How-Wal-Mart...530?matches=32

The other path for that plan ends with Gary Snook 'giving a
party for America' until all the capital is gone. Eddie
Lampert may be doing the same thing more slowly.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #26  
Old October 22nd 20, 01:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,154
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 1:47:20 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/20/2020 10:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, October 20, 2020 at 5:46:34 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:59:46 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 11:48:43 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 7:54:29 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote to Andrew Muzi:

You run a business. When bikes are selling like hotcakes, you don't drop the price. You sell your stock and bank the money for hard times -- maybe pay down your credit line or long term debt. You don't run a sale.

That's why you're a lawyer, and outsider looking in, Jay, why no one has ever hunted your handsome head to set up a business or even to run an established business. An entrepreneur in circumstances such as you describe, if he has a bit of capital or can borrow it, will run the biggest sale he ever ran, and buy all the stock he can, even if he has to pay premium prices and sell it below cost, and when the crisis is over, he may be in debt but his competitors will be out of business and his new market will be much, much larger, and he'll be able to attract investment because he'll be the only guy in his business standing up. You must have been skiving off the day they taught Schumpeter and entrepreneurialism in Economics 1899. Or were all the lecturers at your college already Marxists in your time? The problem with Marxism in a capitalist world is that dear old Karl thought of economics as a science, with one sure answer, like engineering. It isn't. It's a game for high rollers,

risk takers.

-- Jay Beattie.

Yeah, you're the one I'm talking to.

Andre Jute
The art is discovering the unit above and the unit below the unit at which the marginal cost meets the marginal income. That takes a lot of skill, but some can substitute luck; luck too is a talent.
Right. Let's take your scenario: Andrew drops prices, sells below cost, runs up huge debt to cover rent, payroll, cost of goods. He ends up with a massive debt-load. This assumes he can even find a lender (other than a CARES Act lender) willing to finance him as he inches towards bankruptcy. He's probably using credit cards or hard-money lenders because no bank is willing to take the risk after he's blown through his credit line or other existing facility, so its a nasty, high interest debt. And as a single shop, he's still not moving enough product to get the best pricing and good or any financing from his distributors.

And lets assume the the Red Jersey down the street can't beat Andrew's prices and shuts the doors. Andrew gets thirty-block market dominance for six months until the Green Jersey opens (selling ebikes and not classic Campagnolo), mostly debt-free. It's a low bar to market entrance. Meanwhile, after the market cools, Andrew has to raise prices to cover debt -- fire employees, move to smaller space, etc., etc. He goes out of business.

The more likely scenario is that the Yellow Jersey and the Red Jersey both make a bundle in the COVID market selling somewhat different products, pay down debt, build reserves, and when demand drops -- then they start price cutting at a time when stock is plentiful -- maybe run an annual sale, put on a bike fair, run an ad. They go back to the usual competition against cost-cutting internet sellers.

In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary world, nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering the market.

-- Jay Beattie.

Have you ever been inside a Walmart or any other supermarket, Jay? How do your think they, or any other chain, got to dominate a market? How do you think Coca-Cola nearly succeeded in bankrupting Pepsi? How do you think any mom and pop store in one generation becomes a universal chain in the third or fourth generation? How do you get a driving license if your eyes are forever closed? What is the sound of one hand clapping? Just checking that you're paying attention.

Andre Jute
An economist is Janus-like. To government he is the enemy of oligopoly, purely on principle. To his corporate clients, he is a fount of practical wisdom on driving (almost all) their competitors out of business.


O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.





No thanks. My old departed friend Bill Quinn literally wrote
the book on that 25 years ago:

https://www.alibris.com/How-Wal-Mart...530?matches=32

The other path for that plan ends with Gary Snook 'giving a
party for America' until all the capital is gone. Eddie
Lampert may be doing the same thing more slowly.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Yup, smart people who have made their own success don't need to listen to lawyers or whiz kids. -- AJ
  #27  
Old October 22nd 20, 06:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,320
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 5:16:45 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 1:47:20 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/20/2020 10:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, October 20, 2020 at 5:46:34 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, October 19, 2020 at 3:59:46 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 11:48:43 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 7:54:29 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote to Andrew Muzi:

You run a business. When bikes are selling like hotcakes, you don't drop the price. You sell your stock and bank the money for hard times -- maybe pay down your credit line or long term debt. You don't run a sale.

That's why you're a lawyer, and outsider looking in, Jay, why no one has ever hunted your handsome head to set up a business or even to run an established business. An entrepreneur in circumstances such as you describe, if he has a bit of capital or can borrow it, will run the biggest sale he ever ran, and buy all the stock he can, even if he has to pay premium prices and sell it below cost, and when the crisis is over, he may be in debt but his competitors will be out of business and his new market will be much, much larger, and he'll be able to attract investment because he'll be the only guy in his business standing up. You must have been skiving off the day they taught Schumpeter and entrepreneurialism in Economics 1899. Or were all the lecturers at your college already Marxists in your time? The problem with Marxism in a capitalist world is that dear old Karl thought of economics as a science, with one sure answer, like engineering. It isn't. It's a game for high rollers,

risk takers.

-- Jay Beattie.

Yeah, you're the one I'm talking to.

Andre Jute
The art is discovering the unit above and the unit below the unit at which the marginal cost meets the marginal income. That takes a lot of skill, but some can substitute luck; luck too is a talent.
Right. Let's take your scenario: Andrew drops prices, sells below cost, runs up huge debt to cover rent, payroll, cost of goods. He ends up with a massive debt-load. This assumes he can even find a lender (other than a CARES Act lender) willing to finance him as he inches towards bankruptcy. He's probably using credit cards or hard-money lenders because no bank is willing to take the risk after he's blown through his credit line or other existing facility, so its a nasty, high interest debt. And as a single shop, he's still not moving enough product to get the best pricing and good or any financing from his distributors.

And lets assume the the Red Jersey down the street can't beat Andrew's prices and shuts the doors. Andrew gets thirty-block market dominance for six months until the Green Jersey opens (selling ebikes and not classic Campagnolo), mostly debt-free. It's a low bar to market entrance. Meanwhile, after the market cools, Andrew has to raise prices to cover debt -- fire employees, move to smaller space, etc., etc. He goes out of business.

The more likely scenario is that the Yellow Jersey and the Red Jersey both make a bundle in the COVID market selling somewhat different products, pay down debt, build reserves, and when demand drops -- then they start price cutting at a time when stock is plentiful -- maybe run an annual sale, put on a bike fair, run an ad. They go back to the usual competition against cost-cutting internet sellers.

In the real world of small business and not the Andre imaginary world, nobody has access to super low-priced inputs (which, IMO, is the key) or enough cash to crush anyone. Even in the world of larger business, everyone from Schwinn to Performance/Nashbar proves that price cutting is more likely to result in bankruptcy than cornering the market.

-- Jay Beattie.

Have you ever been inside a Walmart or any other supermarket, Jay? How do your think they, or any other chain, got to dominate a market? How do you think Coca-Cola nearly succeeded in bankrupting Pepsi? How do you think any mom and pop store in one generation becomes a universal chain in the third or fourth generation? How do you get a driving license if your eyes are forever closed? What is the sound of one hand clapping? Just checking that you're paying attention.

Andre Jute
An economist is Janus-like. To government he is the enemy of oligopoly, purely on principle. To his corporate clients, he is a fount of practical wisdom on driving (almost all) their competitors out of business.

O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.





No thanks. My old departed friend Bill Quinn literally wrote
the book on that 25 years ago:

https://www.alibris.com/How-Wal-Mart...530?matches=32

The other path for that plan ends with Gary Snook 'giving a
party for America' until all the capital is gone. Eddie
Lampert may be doing the same thing more slowly.
--

Yup, smart people who have made their own success don't need to listen to lawyers or whiz kids. -- AJ

There is a reason no one with any brains uses a lawyer as an investment counselor.
  #28  
Old October 22nd 20, 07:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,159
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On 10/20/2020 8:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:

snip

O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.


Are you trying to say that Andre's theory of losing money on everything
you sell but making it up on the volume, doesn't work in the real world?

It does work, at least until all your investors tire of pumping in
money. That's when you go IPO and find a lot of clueless small investors
to lose money. The founders often do get rich before the whole thing
collapses.

I was told that one start-up I worked at was a "rocketship to the moon"
by the recruiter. It was a lot of fun, but my stock options were
worthless by the time I could exercise them. But the founders made out
like bandits.

I hope that bike shops enjoy the current boom.

  #29  
Old October 22nd 20, 07:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,227
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 11:17:06 AM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 10/20/2020 8:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:

snip

O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.


Are you trying to say that Andre's theory of losing money on everything
you sell but making it up on the volume, doesn't work in the real world?

It does work, at least until all your investors tire of pumping in
money. That's when you go IPO and find a lot of clueless small investors
to lose money. The founders often do get rich before the whole thing
collapses.

I was told that one start-up I worked at was a "rocketship to the moon"
by the recruiter. It was a lot of fun, but my stock options were
worthless by the time I could exercise them. But the founders made out
like bandits.

I hope that bike shops enjoy the current boom.


Another humorous thing is that you can sell below [your] cost and still be selling above other's costs. Our family owned a drug store, and my father was a Kodak dealer with preferred pricing, but we could still buy flashbulbs/flashcubes (remember those?) cheaper on sale at the carpet-bagging Thrifty Drug that moved into town in the '60s. They had purchase limits, so my entire family would go over in shifts and buy them out. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c4/d9...670ea166e8.jpg (boo, hiss).

You can get half of everything in the QBP catalog cheaper from Wiggle or PBK. Shimano pulled the plug on those two, but other brands are still cheaper than QBP. There is no way a local bike shop can price compete -- except moving close-out, seconds or others' overstock. Rivercity does millions in sales, but not because they are cheap. https://tinyurl.com/y3bgpbfn

-- Jay Beattie.
  #30  
Old October 22nd 20, 07:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,320
Default {Politics so we don't have to change the subject.

On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 11:44:13 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 11:17:06 AM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 10/20/2020 8:01 PM, jbeattie wrote:

snip

O.K., let's get Andrew onboard and test out your theory. Andrew, start selling all you stock below cost and vanquish your competitors. You will be Walmart in no time. Andre will bankroll you, at least until the Yellow Jersey IPO -- or bankruptcy, whichever comes first.

-- Jay Beattie.


Are you trying to say that Andre's theory of losing money on everything
you sell but making it up on the volume, doesn't work in the real world?

It does work, at least until all your investors tire of pumping in
money. That's when you go IPO and find a lot of clueless small investors
to lose money. The founders often do get rich before the whole thing
collapses.

I was told that one start-up I worked at was a "rocketship to the moon"
by the recruiter. It was a lot of fun, but my stock options were
worthless by the time I could exercise them. But the founders made out
like bandits.

I hope that bike shops enjoy the current boom.

Another humorous thing is that you can sell below [your] cost and still be selling above other's costs. Our family owned a drug store, and my father was a Kodak dealer with preferred pricing, but we could still buy flashbulbs/flashcubes (remember those?) cheaper on sale at the carpet-bagging Thrifty Drug that moved into town in the '60s. They had purchase limits, so my entire family would go over in shifts and buy them out. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c4/d9...670ea166e8.jpg (boo, hiss).

You can get half of everything in the QBP catalog cheaper from Wiggle or PBK. Shimano pulled the plug on those two, but other brands are still cheaper than QBP. There is no way a local bike shop can price compete -- except moving close-out, seconds or others' overstock. Rivercity does millions in sales, but not because they are cheap. https://tinyurl.com/y3bgpbfn

-- Jay Beattie.

Why am I not surprised that you don't understand anything about investing? No one sells below their price unless they are attempting to put a competitor out of business. And that NEVER works for mom and pop establishments.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Learn English!!!! Change ur language and you change ur thoughts. [email protected] UK 0 May 2nd 08 05:23 AM
Specifications subject to change without notice web guy Techniques 9 August 15th 07 10:31 AM
Frame" to change or not to change silverfridge Unicycling 17 January 23rd 06 01:41 PM
Frame" to change or not to change dale_dale Unicycling 0 January 21st 06 03:21 PM
Change of chainring like for like but now it won't change smoothly [email protected] UK 5 June 20th 05 10:02 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.