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Joerg may not be too crazy



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 19th 18, 11:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
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Default Joerg may not be too crazy

http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html

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  #2  
Old May 20th 18, 12:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,488
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On 5/19/2018 5:18 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html


Yikes!

Given the choice, I'd prefer a death like William Riley's.
The inventor/developer of Sturmey Archer gearboxes from 1902
was a Royal Navy machinist in the war years. Riding to work
in 1946(?) he stopped, sat on the curb and said, "I do not
feel well" after which he died.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old May 20th 18, 12:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,149
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html


My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions. Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous place. You need to be packing serious heat: http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg

In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.

-- Jay Beattie.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #4  
Old May 20th 18, 03:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,966
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On 5/19/2018 7:22 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/19/2018 5:18 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html



Yikes!

Given the choice, I'd prefer a death like William Riley's. The
inventor/developer of Sturmey Archer gearboxes from 1902 was a Royal
Navy machinist in the war years. Riding to work in 1946(?) he stopped,
sat on the curb and said, "I do not feel well" after which he died.


FWIW, I lost two different friends that way.

Since we all gotta go sometime, I think: Lucky guys!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old May 20th 18, 03:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,206
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On 2018-05-19 16:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html



My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North
Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode
practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions.
Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous
place. You need to be packing serious heat:
http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg

In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too
far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My
brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some
others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't
recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant
mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.


Mountain lions are not very prevalent in WA state, probably too cold of
a climate for them. That is very different here in CA. I never
encountered one so far but saw fresh tracks on singletrack. Once on a
singletrack I came upon a freshly slain fox right on the trail. While
riding around it something big darted out of a bush and off into the
thick vegetation. I don't know what it was but I only know one animal
that would kill a fox and eat it. So I chose to get out of there and not
to take this trail back home but to use a rather nasty and shoulderless
country road.

WA has different beasts. While on a winter hike in the snow up in the
maintains near Stephens Pass a little bear followed me. It was probably
hoping I'd drop my backpack. Every time I turned around it stopped.
Looked too small for a bear to be on his or her own and eventually it
gave up. I hope it found its way back to mama.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #6  
Old May 20th 18, 07:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,149
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 7:38:05 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-05-19 16:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html



My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North
Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode
practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions.
Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous
place. You need to be packing serious heat:
http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg

In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too
far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My
brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some
others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't
recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant
mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.


Mountain lions are not very prevalent in WA state, probably too cold of
a climate for them. That is very different here in CA. I never
encountered one so far but saw fresh tracks on singletrack. Once on a
singletrack I came upon a freshly slain fox right on the trail. While
riding around it something big darted out of a bush and off into the
thick vegetation. I don't know what it was but I only know one animal
that would kill a fox and eat it. So I chose to get out of there and not
to take this trail back home but to use a rather nasty and shoulderless
country road.

WA has different beasts. While on a winter hike in the snow up in the
maintains near Stephens Pass a little bear followed me. It was probably
hoping I'd drop my backpack. Every time I turned around it stopped.
Looked too small for a bear to be on his or her own and eventually it
gave up. I hope it found its way back to mama.


Oregon has more mountain lions than California. https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conserva...-in-california
https://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/cougar/

And our mountain lions are bigger, faster, stronger and meaner. Oregon is a smaller state, so mountain lion population density is high up here -- between 10-20 per square acre, even downtown. It's how we're handling the homeless problem. I found a mountain lion under my bed this morning. It's bad.

Speaking of wildlife, I went out with the old guys for a short ride this morning, and one of my cohorts ran over a squirrel. I heard its neck snap. Poor 'ittle squirrel. They're everywhere right now, and the only option when you're descending on a bike is to go straight.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #7  
Old May 20th 18, 09:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,241
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

jbeattie wrote:
:On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 7:38:05 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
: On 2018-05-19 16:51, jbeattie wrote:
: On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html
:
:
: My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North
: Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode
: practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions.
: Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous
: place. You need to be packing serious heat:
: http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg
:
: In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too
: far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My
: brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some
: others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't
: recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant
: mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.
:
:
: Mountain lions are not very prevalent in WA state, probably too cold of
: a climate for them. That is very different here in CA. I never
: encountered one so far but saw fresh tracks on singletrack. Once on a
: singletrack I came upon a freshly slain fox right on the trail. While
: riding around it something big darted out of a bush and off into the
: thick vegetation. I don't know what it was but I only know one animal
: that would kill a fox and eat it. So I chose to get out of there and not
: to take this trail back home but to use a rather nasty and shoulderless
: country road.
:
: WA has different beasts. While on a winter hike in the snow up in the
: maintains near Stephens Pass a little bear followed me. It was probably
: hoping I'd drop my backpack. Every time I turned around it stopped.
: Looked too small for a bear to be on his or her own and eventually it
: gave up. I hope it found its way back to mama.

:Oregon has more mountain lions than California. https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conserva...-in-california
:https://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/cougar/

:And our mountain lions are bigger, faster, stronger and meaner. Oregon is a smaller state, so mountain lion population density is high up here -- between 10-20 per square acre, even downtown. It's how we're handling the homeless problem. I found a mountain lion under my bed this morning. It's bad.

:Speaking of wildlife, I went out with the old guys for a short ride this morning, and one of my cohorts ran over a squirrel. I heard its neck snap. Poor 'ittle squirrel. They're everywhere right now, and the only option when you're descending on a bike is to go straight.

Friend of mine had a bad (broke collarbone, totalled bike) caused by
hitting a squirrel. It tired to jump through the wheel, or something.



--
sig 85
  #8  
Old May 20th 18, 09:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,488
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

On 5/20/2018 3:06 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
jbeattie wrote:
:On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 7:38:05 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
: On 2018-05-19 16:51, jbeattie wrote:
: On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html
:
:
: My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North
: Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode
: practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions.
: Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous
: place. You need to be packing serious heat:
: http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg
:
: In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too
: far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My
: brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some
: others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't
: recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant
: mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.
:
:
: Mountain lions are not very prevalent in WA state, probably too cold of
: a climate for them. That is very different here in CA. I never
: encountered one so far but saw fresh tracks on singletrack. Once on a
: singletrack I came upon a freshly slain fox right on the trail. While
: riding around it something big darted out of a bush and off into the
: thick vegetation. I don't know what it was but I only know one animal
: that would kill a fox and eat it. So I chose to get out of there and not
: to take this trail back home but to use a rather nasty and shoulderless
: country road.
:
: WA has different beasts. While on a winter hike in the snow up in the
: maintains near Stephens Pass a little bear followed me. It was probably
: hoping I'd drop my backpack. Every time I turned around it stopped.
: Looked too small for a bear to be on his or her own and eventually it
: gave up. I hope it found its way back to mama.

:Oregon has more mountain lions than California. https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conserva...-in-california
:https://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/cougar/

:And our mountain lions are bigger, faster, stronger and meaner. Oregon is a smaller state, so mountain lion population density is high up here -- between 10-20 per square acre, even downtown. It's how we're handling the homeless problem. I found a mountain lion under my bed this morning. It's bad.

:Speaking of wildlife, I went out with the old guys for a short ride this morning, and one of my cohorts ran over a squirrel. I heard its neck snap. Poor 'ittle squirrel. They're everywhere right now, and the only option when you're descending on a bike is to go straight.

Friend of mine had a bad (broke collarbone, totalled bike) caused by
hitting a squirrel. It tired to jump through the wheel, or something.




http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/squirrel.jpg

Might have been worse with a mountain lion. Squirrels don't
rip out the rider's neck after the crash.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #9  
Old May 21st 18, 02:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,241
Default Joerg may not be too crazy

AMuzi wrote:
:On 5/20/2018 3:06 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
: jbeattie wrote:
: :On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 7:38:05 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
: : On 2018-05-19 16:51, jbeattie wrote:
: : On Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 3:18:24 PM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
: : http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-no...ashington.html
: :
: :
: : My brother lives in Snoqualmie and formerly lived next door in North
: : Bend. I house sat for three months in North Bend and rode
: : practically every day. Every ride was filled with mountain lions.
: : Everywhere -- I had to clean fur out of my chain. Super dangerous
: : place. You need to be packing serious heat:
: : http://glock.pro/attachments/glock-p...1397584614.jpg
: :
: : In all seriousness, my brother said it was on a logging road not too
: : far from his house. He doesn't know yet if it is anyone he knows. My
: : brother was an old guy mountain bike champ (Washington state and some
: : others), so he knows most of the roads and the riders. I don't
: : recall him complaining about mountain lions or the incessant
: : mechanical problems encountered by Joerg for that matter.
: :
: :
: : Mountain lions are not very prevalent in WA state, probably too cold of
: : a climate for them. That is very different here in CA. I never
: : encountered one so far but saw fresh tracks on singletrack. Once on a
: : singletrack I came upon a freshly slain fox right on the trail. While
: : riding around it something big darted out of a bush and off into the
: : thick vegetation. I don't know what it was but I only know one animal
: : that would kill a fox and eat it. So I chose to get out of there and not
: : to take this trail back home but to use a rather nasty and shoulderless
: : country road.
: :
: : WA has different beasts. While on a winter hike in the snow up in the
: : maintains near Stephens Pass a little bear followed me. It was probably
: : hoping I'd drop my backpack. Every time I turned around it stopped.
: : Looked too small for a bear to be on his or her own and eventually it
: : gave up. I hope it found its way back to mama.
:
: :Oregon has more mountain lions than California. https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conserva...-in-california
: :https://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/cougar/
:
: :And our mountain lions are bigger, faster, stronger and meaner. Oregon is a smaller state, so mountain lion population density is high up here -- between 10-20 per square acre, even downtown. It's how we're handling the homeless problem. I found a mountain lion under my bed this morning. It's bad.
:
: :Speaking of wildlife, I went out with the old guys for a short ride this morning, and one of my cohorts ran over a squirrel. I heard its neck snap. Poor 'ittle squirrel. They're everywhere right now, and the only option when you're descending on a bike is to go straight.
:
: Friend of mine had a bad (broke collarbone, totalled bike) caused by
: hitting a squirrel. It tired to jump through the wheel, or something.
:
:
:

:http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/squirrel.jpg

:Might have been worse with a mountain lion. Squirrels don't
:rip out the rider's neck after the crash.

Another reason to refer 36 spoke wheels!



--
sig 9
 




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