A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old May 9th 18, 03:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,427
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution/ CHAIN SUCK!

On Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 6:24:55 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/8/2018 10:07 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at 4:55:10 PM UTC-7, Mark J. wrote:
On 5/8/2018 8:49 AM, jbeattie wrote:

So what? You blew a tire in a pot hole. I'm not getting how this illustrates anything except how lucky you were that you didn't go OTB -- the usual consequence of hitting a pot hole at high speed. What are you suggesting here -- solid tires?

You know the manufacturers are so stupid. That fat Michelin man. I call him sad Michelin man -- a failing tire company. If they did like I suggested in 1982 and made solid tires, they would be great again. Losers.

BTW, I've never crashed because of an equipment failure. I've broken three pedals, snapped six or more cranks (at least three while out of the saddle sprinting), broken handle bars, seat posts.

Impressive technique. When I snapped a crank out of the saddle
(starting from a red light), down I went. Years later, I think I kept
it up when I snapped a chain. Way back in the day, I kept the tandem up
when we popped the small cog off a Regina Corsa cluster (held on only by
two threads, it turned out), but that was a close-run thing. Just can't
figure how to do it with a crank snap, though.

How _does_ one stay up upon snapping a crank? Was the failure not sudden?

Your prospective bike-handling disciple (mostly serious)


Mostly good luck, because I've done plenty of things that have landed me in the hospital, usually related to traction loss. Anyway, with one of the cranks, I was sprinting that little approach hill to Sauvie Island, and the crank broke (Campy NR). The front end wobbled hard, and I put my foot/pedal on the pavement and threw-up some sparks (maybe, it could have happened). The rough part was riding home 15 miles on one leg. I broke two Shimanos near my current home, going over short hills out of the saddle. The last time, I had really hard wobble and again put my foot on the ground, but the SPD pedal came off. I had to hunt around the next morning to find my pedal in a leaf pile on Terwiliger. It still had part of the crank on it. I don't remember the details of the ones back in the 70-90s.

I'm not saying its safe to break equipment, but Joerg's world is so bleak, I though a counter-anecdote was in order. I don't want everyone running for the Xanax and hiding inside, worried about killer cars and exploding tires.

-- Jay Beattie.


lurid graphics here
http://www.yellowjersey.org/jayscranks.html



Which reminds me -- TAKE PICTURES OF YOUR BIKES. When my Roubaix got stolen, I was amazed that I had no pictures of it. Cannondale also wanted pictures when I warrantied an old frame, somehow proving that I was the original owner. Recently, with my Norco gravel bike (new tale of woe), pictures were required.

So, my son was riding the Norco Search with me on the way back from the Gorge a few weeks ago when he downshifted from the big ring to the small and got massive chain suck that buried the chain the the BB, down tube and chain stay. I wanted to pull the crank to get the chain out, but I couldn't loosen the preload cap (no tool), so I had to just yank the chain out, further munging the carbon. Goddamn!

So, over to Ruckus for carbon repair. The real ****er is that I can't get the seller, my favorite shop Western Bikeworks, to give me any solid information on Norco's crash replacement program or any potential for a break on a replacement frame rather than the high cost of carbon repair. I got the bike super-cheap and didn't want to dump a lot more money into it since it doesn't get used much. I sent Western damage pictures but they need the full frame, which is now over at Ruckus. What's a mother to do. Norco has NO customer service. Zero. Everything goes through the dealer. With Cannondale, for example, you can call the company and ask about general policies or get parts numbers, etc.

I'm sure crash replacement is some crappy 20% off a new frame, but I want to make sure before dumping $500 on carbon and paint. My son keeps telling me to go with the repair because it makes the frame stronger. I should make him pay, but all he did was shift. Chain suck sucks.

-- Jay Beattie.

Ads
  #82  
Old May 9th 18, 03:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 2018-05-08 17:59, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 08 May 2018 07:40:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 17:35, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 07 May 2018 08:00:56 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 06:43, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 4:51 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-05-04 15:07, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 10:52 AM, Doug Landau wrote:

With a $45 tire I do not expect to have to rant snipped

I spent another few minutes and $1 of gorilla snot on this tire :
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rdsokmbfixi7jf2/tire.jpg?dl=0

I'll get my 3K miles out of this gatorskin, no problem

OMG, what a terribly ridiculous thing to do to save a few bucks.


It reminds me of the guys who used some sort of glorified soldering
iron to cut "new tread" into their car tires when they were bald. To
save the expense of having to buy new ones.

https://www.hardlineproducts.com/product/tread-doctor-knobby-cutting-tool-for-usa/


Yup. Another accident waiting to happen. The ones I saw in Europe had
sort of a heated "cutting box" at the tip to "dregde" the tread valley.
It's really sick, just like glueing tire side walls is.


Really sick? Just as a fingernail file and a bent nail are when used
as a chain tool?


That works. File usually not even needed, just a hardened nail (the kind
to drive into concrete, pointy tip ground down) and a steel nut on the
other side. The first five decades of my life I did not have a chain
tool yet managed to change dozens of chains. The ones I used rarely had
a missing link. I had to make sure that I did that job when the folks in
the apartment below weren't home because the process is loud.

However, I just splurged and in a few days this will arrive:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/produc...nt=53958754055


One can only speculate about your tails of woe. Firstly you describe
riding in really gnarly terrain, then you describe a remote and
uninhabited area where one can't even stop for a beer. Then in this
remote and uninhabited country you can, apparently, have no problems
finding (1) Concrete nails, (2) Nuts of an appropriate size to use as
a backstop.



You should read more carefully. Where did I say "find"?

You can use a fence nail in a pinch but why not carry this little nail?


... (3)hammer stones. And, apparently these areas are common in
your selected riding areas.


Yes, they are. The Neanderthal guys already knew that most granite and
similar rocks can be used as hammers. Obviously, it seems younger
generations have forgotten.

Out in the yard I have a fist-sized rock that I have used to pound
stuff. Looks decorative in the flower bed and saves me a trip back to
the garage every time.


One can only wonder why anyone would carry concrete nails into the
"outback" given that they are more expensive then common nails and
there is no concrete way out there in the bush.


What "concrete way"? Now you arent making sense.

As for expensive, mine came from a cable clamp. This in turn came from a
bag of 100 of them or so, bought in a German hardware store for a couple
of bucks. These are used to run cables on top of concrete or brick walls
in basements or garages. Over there they do not use wood (and I wish
they didn't in the US). These nails are already half way in the plastic
clamps so you can just grab and pound. I would estimate the commercial
value of this nail to be under $0.02.

Looks like this but the nails are more blueish and very hard:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....L._SL1500_.jpg


I feel that you are rapidly becoming what a Saigon bar girl once
refereed to as a "Bull**** Boy".


Because you can't read comprehensively?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #83  
Old May 9th 18, 04:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,077
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

Joerg writes:

On 2018-05-08 17:59, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 08 May 2018 07:40:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 17:35, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 07 May 2018 08:00:56 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 06:43, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 4:51 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-05-04 15:07, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 10:52 AM, Doug Landau wrote:

With a $45 tire I do not expect to have to rant snipped

I spent another few minutes and $1 of gorilla snot on this tire :
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rdsokmbfixi7jf2/tire.jpg?dl=0

I'll get my 3K miles out of this gatorskin, no problem

OMG, what a terribly ridiculous thing to do to save a few bucks.


It reminds me of the guys who used some sort of glorified soldering
iron to cut "new tread" into their car tires when they were bald. To
save the expense of having to buy new ones.

https://www.hardlineproducts.com/product/tread-doctor-knobby-cutting-tool-for-usa/


Yup. Another accident waiting to happen. The ones I saw in Europe had
sort of a heated "cutting box" at the tip to "dregde" the tread valley.
It's really sick, just like glueing tire side walls is.


Really sick? Just as a fingernail file and a bent nail are when used
as a chain tool?


That works. File usually not even needed, just a hardened nail (the kind
to drive into concrete, pointy tip ground down) and a steel nut on the
other side. The first five decades of my life I did not have a chain
tool yet managed to change dozens of chains. The ones I used rarely had
a missing link. I had to make sure that I did that job when the folks in
the apartment below weren't home because the process is loud.

However, I just splurged and in a few days this will arrive:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/produc...nt=53958754055


One can only speculate about your tails of woe. Firstly you describe
riding in really gnarly terrain, then you describe a remote and
uninhabited area where one can't even stop for a beer. Then in this
remote and uninhabited country you can, apparently, have no problems
finding (1) Concrete nails, (2) Nuts of an appropriate size to use as
a backstop.



You should read more carefully. Where did I say "find"?

You can use a fence nail in a pinch but why not carry this little nail?


... (3)hammer stones. And, apparently these areas are common in
your selected riding areas.


Yes, they are. The Neanderthal guys already knew that most granite and
similar rocks can be used as hammers. Obviously, it seems younger
generations have forgotten.


Neanderthals didn't have goggles, which is why so many of them were
nicknamed "Popeye". Do you typically carry eye protection on your bike?
  #84  
Old May 9th 18, 05:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 2018-05-09 08:51, Radey Shouman wrote:
Joerg writes:

On 2018-05-08 17:59, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 08 May 2018 07:40:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 17:35, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 07 May 2018 08:00:56 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 06:43, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 4:51 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-05-04 15:07, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 10:52 AM, Doug Landau wrote:

With a $45 tire I do not expect to have to rant snipped

I spent another few minutes and $1 of gorilla snot on this tire :
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rdsokmbfixi7jf2/tire.jpg?dl=0

I'll get my 3K miles out of this gatorskin, no problem

OMG, what a terribly ridiculous thing to do to save a few bucks.


It reminds me of the guys who used some sort of glorified soldering
iron to cut "new tread" into their car tires when they were bald. To
save the expense of having to buy new ones.

https://www.hardlineproducts.com/product/tread-doctor-knobby-cutting-tool-for-usa/


Yup. Another accident waiting to happen. The ones I saw in Europe had
sort of a heated "cutting box" at the tip to "dregde" the tread valley.
It's really sick, just like glueing tire side walls is.


Really sick? Just as a fingernail file and a bent nail are when used
as a chain tool?


That works. File usually not even needed, just a hardened nail (the kind
to drive into concrete, pointy tip ground down) and a steel nut on the
other side. The first five decades of my life I did not have a chain
tool yet managed to change dozens of chains. The ones I used rarely had
a missing link. I had to make sure that I did that job when the folks in
the apartment below weren't home because the process is loud.

However, I just splurged and in a few days this will arrive:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/produc...nt=53958754055

One can only speculate about your tails of woe. Firstly you describe
riding in really gnarly terrain, then you describe a remote and
uninhabited area where one can't even stop for a beer. Then in this
remote and uninhabited country you can, apparently, have no problems
finding (1) Concrete nails, (2) Nuts of an appropriate size to use as
a backstop.



You should read more carefully. Where did I say "find"?

You can use a fence nail in a pinch but why not carry this little nail?


... (3)hammer stones. And, apparently these areas are common in
your selected riding areas.


Yes, they are. The Neanderthal guys already knew that most granite and
similar rocks can be used as hammers. Obviously, it seems younger
generations have forgotten.


Neanderthals didn't have goggles, which is why so many of them were
nicknamed "Popeye".



That can't be, they didn't eat spinach :-)


... Do you typically carry eye protection on your bike?


Yes, in the shape of sunglasses. It wouldn't be wise to ride without.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #85  
Old May 9th 18, 05:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 2018-05-09 02:56, Duane wrote:
wrote:
On Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at 5:47:48 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, May 7, 2018 at 7:02:00 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/7/2018 9:28 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, May 7, 2018 at 4:39:31 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

And what do you do for the front? Bikes have two wheels. Call your wife
from the hospital that dinner is off tonight, and the next 10-20 days?

Wow, you're a nervous nelly. And what about the front? We're talking
about a rear wheel and a casing scuff. If it were on the front tire,
I'd keep an eye on it. I've ridden front tires booted with a $1 bill
for many, many miles.

On our coast-to-coast tour, my daughter got a gash over 1/2" in the
front tire of her Terry bike. That bike has an odd size front wheel.
Late Saturday in South Dakota, there was absolutely no way to get a
replacement tire. Ditto Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday... The best
we could do was to call Terry Inc. on Monday and get it quick-shipped to
the next bike shop on our route, which was well over a hundred miles away.

On the road, I triple-booted the tire and we ran low pressure the rest
of that day. In the motel, I stitched the gash back together as well as
I could, re-did the internal boots, and rode the tire all those miles to
that bike shop.

I guess Joerg would have taken a taxi?

No, Joerg's tire would have exploded violently, blowing his body parts
all over the road. He would have been mailed home in a giant Ziplock
bag. Mundane mechanical failures are catastrophic, life endangering events for Joerg.


I don't know, met or talked to anyone that:
- break so many parts on a regular base,
- met so many people who do so also,
- is so scared of events that could happen.

It is so remarkable that I tend to not believing him or doubting his
riding skills. Hitting a pothole in a tunnel at high speed? WTF? What was
he thinking? When I enter a dark tunnel I reduce my speed...

Lou


Apparently after further questioning the hill wasn’t very steep, the
pothole wasn’t very deep and the tunnel wasn’t very dark. It was the fault
of the tire.


Sure it was. That's why I am saying the whole time that tires with wimpy
side walls are junk.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #86  
Old May 10th 18, 02:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,077
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

Joerg writes:

On 2018-05-09 08:51, Radey Shouman wrote:
Joerg writes:

On 2018-05-08 17:59, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 08 May 2018 07:40:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 17:35, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 07 May 2018 08:00:56 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-05-07 06:43, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 4:51 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-05-04 15:07, sms wrote:
On 5/4/2018 10:52 AM, Doug Landau wrote:

With a $45 tire I do not expect to have to rant snipped

I spent another few minutes and $1 of gorilla snot on this tire :
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rdsokmbfixi7jf2/tire.jpg?dl=0

I'll get my 3K miles out of this gatorskin, no problem

OMG, what a terribly ridiculous thing to do to save a few bucks.


It reminds me of the guys who used some sort of glorified soldering
iron to cut "new tread" into their car tires when they were bald. To
save the expense of having to buy new ones.

https://www.hardlineproducts.com/product/tread-doctor-knobby-cutting-tool-for-usa/


Yup. Another accident waiting to happen. The ones I saw in Europe had
sort of a heated "cutting box" at the tip to "dregde" the tread valley.
It's really sick, just like glueing tire side walls is.


Really sick? Just as a fingernail file and a bent nail are when used
as a chain tool?


That works. File usually not even needed, just a hardened nail (the kind
to drive into concrete, pointy tip ground down) and a steel nut on the
other side. The first five decades of my life I did not have a chain
tool yet managed to change dozens of chains. The ones I used rarely had
a missing link. I had to make sure that I did that job when the folks in
the apartment below weren't home because the process is loud.

However, I just splurged and in a few days this will arrive:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/produc...nt=53958754055

One can only speculate about your tails of woe. Firstly you describe
riding in really gnarly terrain, then you describe a remote and
uninhabited area where one can't even stop for a beer. Then in this
remote and uninhabited country you can, apparently, have no problems
finding (1) Concrete nails, (2) Nuts of an appropriate size to use as
a backstop.


You should read more carefully. Where did I say "find"?

You can use a fence nail in a pinch but why not carry this little nail?


... (3)hammer stones. And, apparently these areas are common in
your selected riding areas.


Yes, they are. The Neanderthal guys already knew that most granite and
similar rocks can be used as hammers. Obviously, it seems younger
generations have forgotten.


Neanderthals didn't have goggles, which is why so many of them were
nicknamed "Popeye".



That can't be, they didn't eat spinach :-)


... Do you typically carry eye protection on your bike?


Yes, in the shape of sunglasses. It wouldn't be wise to ride without.


I think most modern-day flint knappers suggest more than sunglasses.

--
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Desperate Dan Smith agrees to quote OED definition. David Lang UK 8 November 8th 15 04:52 PM
Desperate for Help dudewithasock Unicycling 38 December 1st 05 01:17 AM
Desperate for Help LikeableRodent Unicycling 0 November 28th 05 12:21 AM
a desperate escape from winter non-riding doldrums BB Mountain Biking 2 November 18th 04 02:56 AM
desperate- where can i buy odyssey gloves? ant Marketplace 3 July 1st 04 02:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.