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  #101  
Old June 8th 21, 04:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
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Posts: 2,196
Default Electric Bikes

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 3:44:16 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:25 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 7 Jun 2021 09:13:31 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 10:34:18 PM UTC-7, pH wrote:
On 2021-06-01, Joerg wrote:
snip


The game changer, of course, is the Li ion technology since if was so easy
for uninformed users to kill off their lead acid battery pack.


Li-Ion also has its issues. For example, even top brand manufacturers do
not seem to understand that it is not a good idea to top off a Li-Ion
battery at close to 100% charge and then leave the bike in the garage
that way. This results in premature aging and loss of capacity. The
smarter way is to offer 80% or so which is plenty for a short ride into
town. Then let users top it off in the morning when they expect to go on
a very long ride. In the same way, don't ride it all the way down to
where the low-batt cutoff turns it off, at least not often.

"Smart" battery chargers would seem to be in order. Push the button if you
need more than an 80% charge this time for some reason.



NiMH would be more robust, but that chemistry never seemed to catch on
before Lithium came on the scene.


NiMH doesn't have an adequate energy density. A NiHM-battery that can
last 40-50mi would be unreasonably large and heavy.

[...]

pH in Aptos


Is the old stranded concrete ship still there?


Use..the SS Palo Alto.
About two years ago the winter storms broke the last 1/4 of the stern off
and it twisted about 80 degrees from level.

When I was a tad one could actually walk out to the bow. Then it was
fenced off at half way. Then when I came back from college and other things
it was closed off entirely and you can only walk out to the end of the pier
the ship abutts.

Sigh. Things change.
Concrete exposed to water saturation degrades surprisingly rapidly. One of the instruments I was working on detected leaks from degrading concrete is swimming pools. I would imagine that you could make a pool thick enough to delay this for a long time as those concrete barges showed. But degrade they will. The concrete turns back to almost a mush consistency.


Oh, you mean like the Alvord Lake Bridge that was built in 1889 in San
Francisco, CA. This bridge was the first reinforced concrete bridge,
and it still exists today, over one hundred years after it was built!

Or maybe the Hoover Dam? Constructed some 85 years ago and still
standing. Up to this time, the largest scale concrete project ever
completed.

+1
Concrete can be durable if it's done right:

https://www.historicmysteries.com/roman-concrete/

Couple thousand years anyway, maybe longer.

The stone structures of the Roman Colosseum isn't anything like modern concrete and I don't believe they even know how to make that stuff in the first place. Today's concrete is made of limestone and clay Only 10% or so of Concrete is made of cement and the the concoction of cement varies with climate and the use its to be put to. What we need is for John to google something about concrete to tell me I'm wrong. There are two kinds of lifers - those who are very good at what they do and stay at it because they are so good at it. Then there are the kind like John who so obviously never knew a thing about anything. Such as his claim about being on B52 bases and never hearing them referred to a Buffs. Other than referring to them by their serial numbers the flight crew often used that term. To maintenance it was all serial numbers.
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  #102  
Old June 8th 21, 04:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
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Posts: 2,196
Default Electric Bikes

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 6:15:19 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Mon, 7 Jun 2021 16:06:05 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 3:25:30 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 7 Jun 2021 09:13:31 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 10:34:18 PM UTC-7, pH wrote:
On 2021-06-01, Joerg wrote:
snip


The game changer, of course, is the Li ion technology since if was so easy
for uninformed users to kill off their lead acid battery pack.


Li-Ion also has its issues. For example, even top brand manufacturers do
not seem to understand that it is not a good idea to top off a Li-Ion
battery at close to 100% charge and then leave the bike in the garage
that way. This results in premature aging and loss of capacity. The
smarter way is to offer 80% or so which is plenty for a short ride into
town. Then let users top it off in the morning when they expect to go on
a very long ride. In the same way, don't ride it all the way down to
where the low-batt cutoff turns it off, at least not often.

"Smart" battery chargers would seem to be in order. Push the button if you
need more than an 80% charge this time for some reason.



NiMH would be more robust, but that chemistry never seemed to catch on
before Lithium came on the scene.


NiMH doesn't have an adequate energy density. A NiHM-battery that can
last 40-50mi would be unreasonably large and heavy.

[...]

pH in Aptos


Is the old stranded concrete ship still there?


Use..the SS Palo Alto.
About two years ago the winter storms broke the last 1/4 of the stern off
and it twisted about 80 degrees from level.

When I was a tad one could actually walk out to the bow. Then it was
fenced off at half way. Then when I came back from college and other things
it was closed off entirely and you can only walk out to the end of the pier
the ship abutts.

Sigh. Things change.
Concrete exposed to water saturation degrades surprisingly rapidly. One of the instruments I was working on detected leaks from degrading concrete is swimming pools. I would imagine that you could make a pool thick enough to delay this for a long time as those concrete barges showed. But degrade they will. The concrete turns back to almost a mush consistency.
Oh, you mean like the Alvord Lake Bridge that was built in 1889 in San
Francisco, CA. This bridge was the first reinforced concrete bridge,
and it still exists today, over one hundred years after it was built!

Or maybe the Hoover Dam? Constructed some 85 years ago and still
standing. Up to this time, the largest scale concrete project ever
completed.


So explain to everyone here what water the Alvord Lake Bridge is on?

Mostly true. The bridge originally had water under it:
https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=File:Alvord_Lake_and_Bridge,_at_Ha ight_Street_entrance_to_Golden_Gate_Park_c_1890_wn p15.1138.jpg
https://sfrichmondreview.com/2018/03/03/swan-on-the-lake/
Since cars pass beneath it it would be a real trick for there to be a waterway beneath it.

At some point in the past, the lake was filled with dirt to ground
level. I couldn't find an exact date. The earliest photo showing a
road instead of a lake was dated 1913, so I assume that there was
water under the bridge for no more than 24 years.

This is what the bridge looks like recently:
https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/photosviewer.php?bridgebrowser=california/alvordlake/&gallerynum=1&gallerysize=1
https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/alvord-lake-bridge
No water, so this bridge is not a good example of concrete longevity.

Looks like they did some rebar and masonry repair work in 2020 for
damage caused by roots and ground movement:
http://giampolinicourtney.com/alvord-lake-bridge
As for Hoover Dam, why do you insist on showing your ignorance on every subject under the sun? The fam is 45 ft thick at the surface and rarely has water up to that level. The bottom of the dam is 660 feet thick. Perhaps you'd care to explain to us how that compared to a concrete barge with a wall thickness of 18"?

It's a ship, not a barge:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Palo_Alto
Because you can use Google doesn't mean you know a damn thing you anti-intellectual.

I'll give you half a point for getting the Alvord Bridge right, and a
full point for getting Hoover Dam and most of the concrete boat right.
However, I'll take off a point for exceeding your ration of insults
allowed in a single posting. Please note that readers tend to
eventually develop an immune response to your insults and that
additional insults have little added effect.
--
Jeff Liebermann
PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

What do you suppose caused that ship to degrade all by itself and fall apart? Do you suppose it was looters or earthquakes? There is something very screwed up in the minds of people like you and John. I say that I actually designed and programmed an instruments to find the spots in swimming pools that are leaking and that there is an entire industry using that instrument and repairing the damage from failing concrete and you will do absolutely anything to disprove that. You are no longer sane. I suggest you see a psychologist the sooner the better before you are unable to disprove me and commit suicide as a result of your dispair.
  #103  
Old June 8th 21, 05:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Electric Bikes

On 6/8/2021 11:13 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:

I say that I actually designed and programmed an instruments to find the spots in swimming pools that are leaking and that there is an entire industry using that instrument and repairing the damage from failing concrete...

Wow! Is there a link to the Kunich Leak Detector System? Or to evidence
that an entire industry is using it?

... and you will do absolutely anything to disprove that.


I'm prepared to give you credit. I'll just need corroboration from
something other than your "memory."

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #104  
Old June 8th 21, 07:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
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Posts: 2,196
Default Electric Bikes

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 9:08:41 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/8/2021 11:13 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:

I say that I actually designed and programmed an instruments to find the spots in swimming pools that are leaking and that there is an entire industry using that instrument and repairing the damage from failing concrete....

Wow! Is there a link to the Kunich Leak Detector System? Or to evidence
that an entire industry is using it?

... and you will do absolutely anything to disprove that.


I'm prepared to give you credit. I'll just need corroboration from
something other than your "memory."


So now you're denying that there is an entire industry finding and repairing water leads through concrete structures? Or have to deflected this to my memory? That's it isn't it? You are so jealous that with an education you became nothing and with hard work I became successful, you'll do anything and say anything to attack me. I am actually enjoying your repeated demonstrations of the pain you have about this.
  #105  
Old June 8th 21, 07:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 2,041
Default Electric Bikes

On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 7:08:28 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 5 Jun 2021 11:32:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 6:18:01 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 10:47:24 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 7:19:28 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 15:51:28 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 6/3/2021 11:22 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 8:03:51 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/2/2021 8:05 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 18:25:00 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:


One acquaintance of mine has an all-electric car and a very large solar
array on his house. His system is set up to first recharge the car. When
the car is topped up, the system sends electricity back to the power
company, reducing his bill. He's very happy with it.

Out of curiosity has your acquaintance ever calculated the pay back on
the system?
Not as far as I know, and I doubt the payback matters to him. He's
extremely committed to environmental issues. For him, his system is just
The Right Thing To Do.

What is the environmental damage from the construction and then destruction of solar panel arrays? This is not a minor problem. Do you have any idea of the maintenance problem of large dams? ...

Not to mention the environmental damage from mining and burning coal,
drilling for oil, converting huge portions of our corn crop into fuel...

Errr... I believe that the corn turned into fuel is grown in addition
to the normal crop grown for food. In fact I remember the loud shouts
of joy when the farmers found that they could get paid for growing
even more corn to be turn into alchol:-)

Yes. But the over production of corn for fuel leads to lower prices for corn, which might, likely does decrease the net income of said farmers. They are too successful at producing grains that are not really needed. Then the US government has to make higher crop subsidy payments instead of putting the money to pay off the debt. Or offer health insurance to those with none. Or some other wasteful thing. Like new military jet planes. Trump gave many billions of dollars to farmers to buy votes and subsidize them. And growing more corn than we need also introduces more chemicals and fertilizers into the soil which poisons our water. Too much poison in the water is harder to deal with than too little poison.

Have a look at
https://www.macrotrends.net/2532/cor...cal-chart-data
which shows corn prices over the past 60 years and the level seems to
have risen some 560% during that period.

--
Cheers,

John B.


That equals a 11.12% annual return/increase in price. Seed corn, what you need to start with to grow the corn crop, probably also increased a similar expense. Tractor to plant, plus the planter itself, plus the combine and corn head to harvest the corn, plus the wagons to haul the corn from the field to the elevator in town, also have to be paid for to operate as a business. Assuming you bought all this machinery on loans, interest to pay the bank. Then add in personal living expenses like a house and car to drive to the grocery store, and groceries to feed yourself, utilities gas and electric, clothes, Sunday morning church offering, etc. Farm land prices and rents have also increased considerably in the past 60 years. Got to pay for the land to farm.

https://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/central.html
Above is a link to Average and Median USA incomes from 1991 to 2019. Just half the 60 years from your corn price reply. Average/Median in the USA went from 20.9/15 thousand in 1991 to 51.9/34 thousand in 2019. Less annual increase for the whole USA than for corn prices. But still 2.5 or 2.3 increase in less than 30 years. Compared to your corn increase of 5.6 in 60 years. Somewhat close.

Dow Jones average was around 5,662 in May 1960. Its now 34,756 in June 2021. I just found some rough numbers. No precise dates so don't get too exact with me. 5,662 to 34,756 in 61 years (close to your 60 year corn numbers) is an increase of 614%. Fairly comparable to your 560% corn increase over 60 years. So commodity prices like corn have increased at about the same price as financial stocks. Maybe the same applies to commodities like iron, cotton, lumber, silver too.

Now to the point, maybe. Corn is grown by farmers and corn is used to feed people and animals. And the animals that eat the corn are used by people.. So corn is a useful commodity. And with lots more people on earth than there were 60 years ago, it should be more valuable today. More people need more corn. But corn has just gone up in value about like everything else. Not more even though its become more important with the world wide growth in population. So corn prices are depressed!!!!


I see your rationalization but I'm not sure that it is accurate as a
very large proportion of the world's population do not eat corn nor do
they feed animals on corn. In fact, growing up on a small farm in New
Hampshire I don't remember feeding corn to anything but chickens...
and people, or course.


--
Cheers,

John B.


I think the corn market has changed considerably since your New Hampshire childhood days. I think back then field corn, as opposed to sweet corn which is eaten by human beings. Field corn is/was used as animal feed. That was about it back then. But today, through the advancement of science and all the other evils of the world, corn is now used to make corn syrup, sugar, for food sweetening. Soda pop. And probably added to every other processed factory made food on earth too. And of course field corn is used to ferment some alcohol out of it to add to gasoline and make ethanol. So the demand and production of field corn has sky rocketed in recent decades.

Here is a neat informative article on Iowa corn. I'm positive Iowa corn is superior to all the corn grown in other states.
https://www.iowacorn.org/media-page/corn-facts

Another neat article on corn in the US. This is a guvment website so they are automatically liars according to Tom. So...
https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2019...gest-crop-2019

Here is a chart of the amount of field corn grown in the USA over the decades. Looks like 1970 corn production was only 29% of 2020 corn production. I picked 1970 figuring you were a kid in NH at the time. Or is 1960 more accurate.
https://www.worldofcorn.com/#us-corn-production
  #106  
Old June 8th 21, 08:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 2,041
Default Electric Bikes

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 5:25:30 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:

Or maybe the Hoover Dam? Constructed some 85 years ago and still
standing. Up to this time, the largest scale concrete project ever
completed.


Wasn't that Chinese Three Gorges Rivers Dam bigger than Hoover Dam? I think it was. Didn't they use concrete making it?
You wrote up to "this" time. Not up to "that" time.


--
Cheers,

John B.

  #107  
Old June 8th 21, 08:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Electric Bikes

On 6/8/2021 2:22 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 9:08:41 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/8/2021 11:13 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:

I say that I actually designed and programmed an instruments to find the spots in swimming pools that are leaking and that there is an entire industry using that instrument and repairing the damage from failing concrete...

Wow! Is there a link to the Kunich Leak Detector System? Or to evidence
that an entire industry is using it?

... and you will do absolutely anything to disprove that.


I'm prepared to give you credit. I'll just need corroboration from
something other than your "memory."


So now you're denying that there is an entire industry finding and repairing water leads through concrete structures? Or have to deflected this to my memory? That's it isn't it? You are so jealous that with an education you became nothing and with hard work I became successful, you'll do anything and say anything to attack me. I am actually enjoying your repeated demonstrations of the pain you have about this.


I think your claim is false. If it's true, don't deflect. Give your
evidence.

(Such a successful person should know how to do that!)

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #108  
Old June 8th 21, 08:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,041
Default Electric Bikes

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 1:22:34 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 9:08:41 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/8/2021 11:13 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:

I say that I actually designed and programmed an instruments to find the spots in swimming pools that are leaking and that there is an entire industry using that instrument and repairing the damage from failing concrete....

Wow! Is there a link to the Kunich Leak Detector System? Or to evidence
that an entire industry is using it?

... and you will do absolutely anything to disprove that.


I'm prepared to give you credit. I'll just need corroboration from
something other than your "memory."

So now you're denying that there is an entire industry finding and repairing water leads through concrete structures? Or have to deflected this to my memory? That's it isn't it? You are so jealous that with an education you became nothing and with hard work I became successful, you'll do anything and say anything to attack me. I am actually enjoying your repeated demonstrations of the pain you have about this.


Tom, you are doing your well known divert the subject technique again. Frank is not and has not ever said concrete structures leaking water does not occur. It does. Frank, me, and everyone else on earth probably knows concrete leaks water. Or can leak water eventually. And Frank knows there is a system or group of companies who find these leaks and repair them. Common knowledge.

But, but, but, Frank did not ask or dispute whether concrete structures leak water. No. He asked for you to show some proof that you Tom Kunich invented the concrete (swimming pool) leak detection system used by the entire leak detection industry. As you claim to have done in your above posting. Where is your proof that you created this wonderous leak detection system?

If I called up my local swimming pool maintenance company and asked them to check my pool for leaks. Would they reply "Yeah, we'll come out next week and bring the infamous Kunich Swimming Pool Detector tool to find your leaks. You betcha. The Kunich Detector finds every leak sure as the sun rises in the west over in Australia."
  #109  
Old June 8th 21, 09:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 9,477
Default Electric Bikes

On 6/8/2021 11:51 AM, wrote:

snip

Here is a chart of the amount of field corn grown in the USA over the decades. Looks like 1970 corn production was only 29% of 2020 corn production. I picked 1970 figuring you were a kid in NH at the time. Or is 1960 more accurate.
https://www.worldofcorn.com/#us-corn-production

Family Guy had a good piece on corn...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FWBxVis49M.

 




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