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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #431  
Old June 18th 16, 02:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,184
Default AG: Squirrel!

On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 10:17:10 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Ah, Lotus Tesco, think "Thai Walmart", has an even simpler solution.
they offer a discount for those that don't require a plastic bag.


Marsh Supermarket gives you a nickel off for each bag you re-use, but
not if you want your stuff loose in the cart. Which I always do when
cycling; much easier to pack groceries into panniers if I don't have
to unpack them first. And my habit of using crumpled grocery bags as
packing material means that I always have plenty of bags when I need
to hang something off the side.

I found a trick for bungeeing a loaf of bread to the rack: put it in
a bag, tie the handles of the bag to the front of the rack, puncture
the bottom of the bag in two places while hooking bungee cords to the
back of the rack.

I've been shopping at Mash lately, more's the pity -- because of the
location, I rarely go there unless I'm on the way home from the
dentist. But after Thursday I won't need another followup until my
regular appointment in August.

At Kroger, I never use the self-service checkouts. The bag boy is
delighted when I say I don't want my groceries packed; the machine has
a nervous breakdown if you don't put each item scanned into a bag.
Putting it on the platform the bag rests on won't do.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
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  #432  
Old June 18th 16, 03:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,418
Default AG: Squirrel!

On 6/17/2016 9:08 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

I found a trick for bungeeing a loaf of bread to the rack: put it in
a bag, tie the handles of the bag to the front of the rack, puncture
the bottom of the bag in two places while hooking bungee cords to the
back of the rack.


Noted! Good idea! Thanks!

My problem is often judging exactly how much I can carry home on the
bike. Bread always gets loaded last, and not infrequently, it's got to
be lashed on top somehow. This will help.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #433  
Old June 18th 16, 04:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Squirrel!

On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:08:45 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 10:17:10 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Ah, Lotus Tesco, think "Thai Walmart", has an even simpler solution.
they offer a discount for those that don't require a plastic bag.


Marsh Supermarket gives you a nickel off for each bag you re-use, but
not if you want your stuff loose in the cart. Which I always do when
cycling; much easier to pack groceries into panniers if I don't have
to unpack them first. And my habit of using crumpled grocery bags as
packing material means that I always have plenty of bags when I need
to hang something off the side.


The Tesco Lotus stores seem to prefer cloth shopping bags, or at least
not used plastic bags. The other alternative is to put the items loose
in the shopping cart, which they allow.

In many shops here the plastic bag with the shop's name on it is only
available at the check out counter and seems to, in addition to
holding the goods, serve as evidence that you've paid for the stuff.


I found a trick for bungeeing a loaf of bread to the rack: put it in
a bag, tie the handles of the bag to the front of the rack, puncture
the bottom of the bag in two places while hooking bungee cords to the
back of the rack.

I've been shopping at Mash lately, more's the pity -- because of the
location, I rarely go there unless I'm on the way home from the
dentist. But after Thursday I won't need another followup until my
regular appointment in August.

At Kroger, I never use the self-service checkouts. The bag boy is
delighted when I say I don't want my groceries packed; the machine has
a nervous breakdown if you don't put each item scanned into a bag.
Putting it on the platform the bag rests on won't do.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #434  
Old June 18th 16, 11:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,184
Default AG: GET OFF THE REPRODUCING ROAD!!!!


There's a lot to be said about how to choose which part of which lane
to operate your bicycle in -- but if you are not moving you don't
belong in ANY part of the road.

If you are stopped for a light or if you are waiting for traffic to
clear, of course you belong exactly where you want to be when you
resume moving. But if a tour group stops for a consultation, or if
you stop to read your map or fiddle with your equipment, PULL OFF THE
ROAD FIRST.

Ye cats, that should go without saying.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.




  #435  
Old June 19th 16, 03:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,184
Default AG: Today's Ride

Oops! I clicked "send" instead of "save for further editing". (Those
buttons are *way* too close together!) My first impulse was to save
this report for next week, but a post sent out all raw and unpolished
after being pounded out in one sitting probably requires an apology,
so this one will go out on schedule. Pout. I was *so* pleased to
have something to add to the buffer!


17 June 2016

There are only three posts in the buffer, not one of them can be
finished in time to post on Sunday, and one of them probably will
*never* be finished. So I'll post a report on tomorrow's Tour
d'Warsaw. I do hope the report turns out boring.

Since the prediction is "hot and dry", I've insulated a pannier with
newspapers for the ride. Now I'm in full summer kit: long-sleeved
linen jersey, linen knickers, thin socks, mesh-back gloves, and a
linen do-rag instead of a scarf. I've put a pint of water in the
fridge, and I've checked the supply of ice cubes. I plan to fill a
quart Rubbermaid bottle with ice, then pour chilled water over it.


Unicode U + 2042


18 June 2016

Sunscreen: I paid particular attention to the outside edges of my
calves, because that is where I got red streaks when I could ride all
day.

Over at tech, there's an impassioned warning against wearing sandals
on a bike. I've been strongly opposed to exposed toes anywhere near
pedals ever since I stuck my little foot into the spokes of my
tricycle while riding back and forth on the porch, and got a blood
blister. A blood blister *really* grosses out a small child.

But I gave up that prejudice this spring, when I figured out that my
oxfords were not only responsible for my corns, they were the cause of
the sore spot that develops on the ball of my foot.

Since I plan to wear sandals for the entire trip, I chose "thin" socks
that I suspect of being too thick to fit inside the Duegis. The back
half of the cuff is twice as wide as the rest, and the extension is a
bit thicker than the rest of the cuff. It said "tab back" on the
package, if I recall correctly, so there must be some sort of purpose
for that. It does make it slightly easier to pull on the sock.

I was pleased to see that the toe straps of my sandals cover most of
the knitted-in advertisement. It says "Ballston", "Since 1918", and
"Built to wear". I think they were meant for running shoes. (I buy
any wool -- or even part-wool -- sock I see.)


Unicode U + 2042


There was an event of interest on the way out of the village.

I was in the section of Park Avenue that has parking on both sides,
riding in the center of my lane, when I saw a car in my rear-view
mirror. A long stretch of empty parking spaces lay ahead, and I moved
into it to let him by. He was driving more slowly than is usual for
that street, and continued to slow. Riding as slowly as I could, I
passed behind a pedestrian waiting for a chance to cross and stopped
behind a parked car. The overtaking car stopped to allow the
pedestrian to cross, then just sat there. I turned my head to see
what the hold-up was, and the car immediately started moving.

Duh! Up until then, I hadn't emitted the faintest clue that I knew he
was there!



It's just as well that I forgot to put my bottle of tea into my
cooler; this turned out to be a very short ride. I did plan to come
back by way of the boardwalk to put in an extra mile, but I got on
Fort Wayne street to cross SR 15 and absent-mindedly followed it all
the way to Owen's. I realized it about halfway there, but wasn't
sufficiently dedicated to extra miles to turn around and go back.

I went to the Farmer's Market hoping to buy a small piece of beeswax,
and didn't think to bring a pill pouch to put it in. I dropped it and
got it dirty.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



  #436  
Old June 19th 16, 10:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Today's Ride

On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 23:39:13 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

Oops! I clicked "send" instead of "save for further editing". (Those
buttons are *way* too close together!) My first impulse was to save
this report for next week, but a post sent out all raw and unpolished
after being pounded out in one sitting probably requires an apology,
so this one will go out on schedule. Pout. I was *so* pleased to
have something to add to the buffer!


What is this "buffer" you frequently refer to? I understand "buffer"
but how does it relate to posts. I envision a block of memory
somewhere that has to be filled before the mail can be sent, but I
don't recall ever seeing a mail system that worked that way.


17 June 2016

There are only three posts in the buffer, not one of them can be
finished in time to post on Sunday, and one of them probably will
*never* be finished. So I'll post a report on tomorrow's Tour
d'Warsaw. I do hope the report turns out boring.

Since the prediction is "hot and dry", I've insulated a pannier with
newspapers for the ride. Now I'm in full summer kit: long-sleeved
linen jersey, linen knickers, thin socks, mesh-back gloves, and a
linen do-rag instead of a scarf. I've put a pint of water in the
fridge, and I've checked the supply of ice cubes. I plan to fill a
quart Rubbermaid bottle with ice, then pour chilled water over it.


Unicode U + 2042


18 June 2016

Sunscreen: I paid particular attention to the outside edges of my
calves, because that is where I got red streaks when I could ride all
day.

Over at tech, there's an impassioned warning against wearing sandals
on a bike. I've been strongly opposed to exposed toes anywhere near
pedals ever since I stuck my little foot into the spokes of my
tricycle while riding back and forth on the porch, and got a blood
blister. A blood blister *really* grosses out a small child.

But I gave up that prejudice this spring, when I figured out that my
oxfords were not only responsible for my corns, they were the cause of
the sore spot that develops on the ball of my foot.


I live in a country where most of the people wear sandals, at least
part of the time, and I wear them all the time when I am in Phuket. I
see people wearing sandals riding bicycles all the time and I do
myself. My neighbor's kids ride barefoot.

I imagine that some people have pinched a toe but they probably regard
it much like cutting a finger in the kitchen, "I'll be more careful
the next time I'm slicing beets".

Since I plan to wear sandals for the entire trip, I chose "thin" socks
that I suspect of being too thick to fit inside the Duegis. The back
half of the cuff is twice as wide as the rest, and the extension is a
bit thicker than the rest of the cuff. It said "tab back" on the
package, if I recall correctly, so there must be some sort of purpose
for that. It does make it slightly easier to pull on the sock.

I was pleased to see that the toe straps of my sandals cover most of
the knitted-in advertisement. It says "Ballston", "Since 1918", and
"Built to wear". I think they were meant for running shoes. (I buy
any wool -- or even part-wool -- sock I see.)

Unicode U + 2042


There was an event of interest on the way out of the village.

I was in the section of Park Avenue that has parking on both sides,
riding in the center of my lane, when I saw a car in my rear-view
mirror. A long stretch of empty parking spaces lay ahead, and I moved
into it to let him by. He was driving more slowly than is usual for
that street, and continued to slow. Riding as slowly as I could, I
passed behind a pedestrian waiting for a chance to cross and stopped
behind a parked car. The overtaking car stopped to allow the
pedestrian to cross, then just sat there. I turned my head to see
what the hold-up was, and the car immediately started moving.

Duh! Up until then, I hadn't emitted the faintest clue that I knew he
was there!



It's just as well that I forgot to put my bottle of tea into my
cooler; this turned out to be a very short ride. I did plan to come
back by way of the boardwalk to put in an extra mile, but I got on
Fort Wayne street to cross SR 15 and absent-mindedly followed it all
the way to Owen's. I realized it about halfway there, but wasn't
sufficiently dedicated to extra miles to turn around and go back.

I went to the Farmer's Market hoping to buy a small piece of beeswax,
and didn't think to bring a pill pouch to put it in. I dropped it and
got it dirty.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #437  
Old June 20th 16, 03:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,184
Default AG: Squirrel!

On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:43:57 +0700, John B.
wrote:

In many shops here the plastic bag with the shop's name on it is only
available at the check out counter and seems to, in addition to
holding the goods, serve as evidence that you've paid for the stuff.


When I was last at Walmart, I bought a glue stick and said "no bag;
I'll put it in my pocket", and the clerk verified that I'd taken the
receipt.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #438  
Old June 20th 16, 03:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,184
Default AG: Today's Ride

On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:03:12 +0700, John B.
wrote:

What is this "buffer" you frequently refer to? I understand "buffer"
but how does it relate to posts. I envision a block of memory
somewhere that has to be filled before the mail can be sent, but I
don't recall ever seeing a mail system that worked that way.


It's a writer's term. When writing a series of works, each of which
is supposed to be published on a particular day, it's a *lot* more
comfortable to work ahead than to pound something out at ten minutes
to deadline.

I didn't start posting until I had about three months of buffer --
then winter closed in, and I stopped adding new posts to the buffer,
and by spring it was gone. But I sometimes get two ideas in one ride,
and often take more than one ride a week, so up until this week the
column has continued.

I probably won't have time to write anything this week, because this
coming Saturday is the Day of Caring, when I teach embroidery to
children -- or, in some cases, mount a piece of cloth on which a baby
has scribbled with Sharpie markers under a parent's supervision. Hence
the purchase of beeswax at the farmers' market -- I suspected that my
spare piece was too big to carry in an Altoids box. I was pleased to
hear a child spontaneously say that the wax I bought was cute! (It's
shaped like a robot.)

On the same ride, I tried and failed to buy an eighth of a yard of
happyface-yellow broadcloth. All the yellows were subtle, one way or
another. So today I bleached a couple of scraps of taxicab-orange
linen, having noted that the jersey made from it got yellower with
exposure to the sun. And while typing this, awk scrickle, my packet
of floss-for-children doesn't include black. And there is no black in
the stash. I put my darkest skein of navy blue into the
embroidery-gig packet in case I can't stop at Lowery's on my way to
the dentist on Thursday.

"Embroidery floss" is like "German silver" or "shank's pony": it's a
type of loosely-spun cotton originally intended to be a cheap
substitute for silk floss. It's so poor at that that few people know
why it's called "floss", but quite good for decorating things that
don't have to stand up to wear.

On the ride before that ride, I had another awk-scrickle moment in
Walmart when I saw a display of glue sticks. There are no glue sticks
in the drawer under the sewing machine, and I suspect that I've thrown
them away.

After buying a glue stick, I read my check list!

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #439  
Old June 20th 16, 07:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Today's Ride

On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 23:50:06 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:03:12 +0700, John B.
wrote:

What is this "buffer" you frequently refer to? I understand "buffer"
but how does it relate to posts. I envision a block of memory
somewhere that has to be filled before the mail can be sent, but I
don't recall ever seeing a mail system that worked that way.


It's a writer's term. When writing a series of works, each of which
is supposed to be published on a particular day, it's a *lot* more
comfortable to work ahead than to pound something out at ten minutes
to deadline.


For a year or so I wrote a weekly column for the technical section of
the local newspaper and was forever getting e-mails from my sub-editor
saying things like "where's your story for the week". Every once in a
while I would get all virtuous and knock out several weeks writing and
than of course I'd loaf until I got another frantic "Where's your
column?" missive.

I didn't start posting until I had about three months of buffer --
then winter closed in, and I stopped adding new posts to the buffer,
and by spring it was gone. But I sometimes get two ideas in one ride,
and often take more than one ride a week, so up until this week the
column has continued.


I though that Winter was when everyone stayed home and knitted socks?
At least it was in up-state New Hampshire when I was a lad.

I probably won't have time to write anything this week, because this
coming Saturday is the Day of Caring, when I teach embroidery to
children -- or, in some cases, mount a piece of cloth on which a baby
has scribbled with Sharpie markers under a parent's supervision. Hence
the purchase of beeswax at the farmers' market -- I suspected that my
spare piece was too big to carry in an Altoids box. I was pleased to
hear a child spontaneously say that the wax I bought was cute! (It's
shaped like a robot.)


When I was a kid embroidered "samplers" I think they called them, were
pretty common. Sort of "God Bless Out Happy Home" sort of things
framed and hung on the wall. But I suppose that is another lost art.

My wife makes most of her own clothes... mainly as a hobby, I guess
you'd call it. Occasionally someone at a party will ask her "Oh, where
did you get that dress?" When she replies, "I made it." people sort of
bug their eyes out as say things like "OH MY Goodness. You can sew?"
as though she just invented gravity. I find it sort of amusing as my
mother (I think she enjoyed it too) sewed. I think that all our wool
"winter" shirts were hand made.

On the same ride, I tried and failed to buy an eighth of a yard of
happyface-yellow broadcloth. All the yellows were subtle, one way or
another. So today I bleached a couple of scraps of taxicab-orange
linen, having noted that the jersey made from it got yellower with
exposure to the sun. And while typing this, awk scrickle, my packet
of floss-for-children doesn't include black. And there is no black in
the stash. I put my darkest skein of navy blue into the
embroidery-gig packet in case I can't stop at Lowery's on my way to
the dentist on Thursday.


Can you buy an eighth of a yard of fabric? Here fabric is sold by the
yard or meters only. Which confuses me no end as it also comes in at
least two standard widths :-) So, if you take this material it is two
meters and that one is three :-)

"Embroidery floss" is like "German silver" or "shank's pony": it's a
type of loosely-spun cotton originally intended to be a cheap
substitute for silk floss. It's so poor at that that few people know
why it's called "floss", but quite good for decorating things that
don't have to stand up to wear.


On the ride before that ride, I had another awk-scrickle moment in
Walmart when I saw a display of glue sticks. There are no glue sticks
in the drawer under the sewing machine, and I suspect that I've thrown
them away.

After buying a glue stick, I read my check list!


I make up "shopping lists". I keep a clip board and when I think of
something I write it down. It is surprising, one will think, "Oh I
better buy one of those" and if you don't write it down immediately
then next time you come back from the store you will remember it. Just
as you carry the bags in the front door :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #440  
Old June 21st 16, 04:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,418
Default AG: Today's Ride

On 6/20/2016 2:48 AM, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 23:50:06 -0300, Joy Beeson wrote:

After buying a glue stick, I read my check list!


I make up "shopping lists". I keep a clip board and when I think of
something I write it down. It is surprising, one will think, "Oh I
better buy one of those" and if you don't write it down immediately
then next time you come back from the store you will remember it. Just
as you carry the bags in the front door :-)


I'm a list addict, but these days I tend to put them in an app in my
smartphone. I have lists for shopping, a general "to do" list, a more
specific "to do for the house" list, a list of books to read, another of
movies that have been recommended, etc.

The benefit of the phone app is, I suppose, I can efficiently lose all
of them at once.

But regarding biking, one thing I haven't solved is the "fix or improve
this thing on the bike" list. Whether it's a front derailleur
adjustment, a slight rattle in a fender, a crooked bag mount or
whatever, I can resolve to fix it as soon as I'm home. But when I take
the bike into the basement, the memory is immediately gone. Until the
next ride, of course.


--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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