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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #451  
Old July 1st 16, 04:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Tour d' Stitches Out -- five miles, three hours

On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 23:32:27 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:28:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Whatever is a "button-sewing kit"? I first envisioned something that
one came in a box and one bought in a store in order to sew buttons
with, and then thought of the little "sewing kits" that my wife
carries with her on trips - a few needles and some twists of thread in
various colors, in an envelope, for emergence repairs.


At the first Day of Helping, someone thought it would be a good plan
to offer lessons in sewing on buttons, and made up a lot of kits
consisting of a zipper sandwich bag containing everything needed to


When I joined the Air Force being able to sew buttons was considered
an ability required by all inductees so the first payday that was a
mandatory purchase at the Base Exchange :-)

Nobody was interested in learning how to sew on a button -- which
should have been expected, because anybody who wanted to learn would

What does Modern America do when a button comes off? throw the shirt
away? :-)

At one point in the afternoon, I held up a cloth-covered cardboard
circle and said "this is a button".


Good Lord! the should teach that in school.... this is a zipper and
this is a button :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #452  
Old July 2nd 16, 01:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,185
Default AG: Tour d' Stitches Out -- five miles, three hours

On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:28:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Try doing "sets" of, say 5 pushups and repeat. In other words, do five
pushups, rest for one minute, then another five, rest, and then a
third set, if possible. As you get stronger add either more sets or
more repetitions.


I'm working my way up to doing my very first pushup. I'm in no hurry;
just resting my weight on my arms for a while helps the osteopenia.


By the way, some exercise authorities recommend that for women, it
is better to start with modified pushups. Instead of the entire body,
supported on hands and toes, try hands and knees until you build your
strength.


That's the "pushup" I was taught in gym class; I don't know how old I
was before I learned how it's really done. I can do that kind with a
weight on my shoulders.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #453  
Old July 2nd 16, 10:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Tour d' Stitches Out -- five miles, three hours

On Fri, 01 Jul 2016 21:06:22 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:28:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Try doing "sets" of, say 5 pushups and repeat. In other words, do five
pushups, rest for one minute, then another five, rest, and then a
third set, if possible. As you get stronger add either more sets or
more repetitions.


I'm working my way up to doing my very first pushup. I'm in no hurry;
just resting my weight on my arms for a while helps the osteopenia.


Bone density is a problem as one grows older. I was diagnosed with
osteoporosis years ago and took Fosamax for several years. Then my
doctor recommended a "vacation" from the Fosamax as it had began to
appear that while Fosamax did improve bone density it also seemed to
make the bones more friable. I think that the first indications were
jaw bone fractures when installing tooth implants.

After a year and a slight decrease in density, taking only calcium and
Vit D, my doctor, who had become rather adamant about not using
Fosamax for long periods, suggested trying Selenium, which I did and
density increased.

Initially I used an approved Selenium medicine which was rather
expensive and after it became obvious that it did help increase bone
density I tried the same stuff but from a "vitamin store" which was
significantly cheaper and seemed to improve density as well as the
expensive stuff.

I'm not in any way encouraging you to use it but it did work for me.

By the way, some exercise authorities recommend that for women, it
is better to start with modified pushups. Instead of the entire body,
supported on hands and toes, try hands and knees until you build your
strength.


That's the "pushup" I was taught in gym class; I don't know how old I
was before I learned how it's really done. I can do that kind with a
weight on my shoulders.


--
cheers,

John B.

  #454  
Old July 3rd 16, 03:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,185
Default AG: When in doubt


When in doubt, lie down in the shade, flat on your back, arms
stretched out to the sides, a bottle of water in one hand and a bottle
of juice in the other. Stay there until one bottle or the other is
empty, not less than five minutes.

That covers you for overheating, dehydration, low blood sugar, and
fatigue.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #455  
Old July 4th 16, 03:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,185
Default AG: Squirrel!

On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:08:45 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

Marsh Supermarket gives you a nickel off for each bag you re-use, but
not if you want your stuff loose in the cart.


When I went to Marsh last Thursday, they gave me a coupon good for a
dozen eggs at my next visit. So I circumnavigated Winona Lake today,
as a first step toward getting back into shape, and stopped at Marsh
for my free eggs. Also a free pound of bananas and a free box of
yogurt, which made a free lunch, or would have if I hadn't also bought
a single-serve cup of potato salad. I don't like Yoplait because the
boxes are upside down, with the opening on the narrow end, and
wouldn't have chosen it if it hadn't been free. It also seemed a bit
short on substance.

Anyhow, when I checked my register tape, I'd gotten three "sack
credits" even though everything would have fit into one bag. I don't
know what was different from the previous trip.

I didn't get yards of coupons this trip. That must have been unusual,
because on Thursday, the check-out commented on it as she was trying
to wind the tape up into something she could hand me.

---------------

I could check the envelope of register tapes to see when I went to
Marsh, but it's pushing midnight and I'm sure nobody cares when I
wrote the above.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.




  #456  
Old July 5th 16, 12:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Squirrel!

On Sun, 03 Jul 2016 23:49:35 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:08:45 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

Marsh Supermarket gives you a nickel off for each bag you re-use, but
not if you want your stuff loose in the cart.


When I went to Marsh last Thursday, they gave me a coupon good for a
dozen eggs at my next visit. So I circumnavigated Winona Lake today,
as a first step toward getting back into shape, and stopped at Marsh
for my free eggs. Also a free pound of bananas and a free box of
yogurt, which made a free lunch, or would have if I hadn't also bought
a single-serve cup of potato salad. I don't like Yoplait because the
boxes are upside down, with the opening on the narrow end, and
wouldn't have chosen it if it hadn't been free. It also seemed a bit
short on substance.


As we don't have "Yoplait" here I had to look it up on the web and I
see that some of the "cups"? are upside down. I wonder what the
reasoning is for that?

Bananas here are sold by the "Bunch". Bananas grow on a long stem with
rings of bananas every few inches and one "ring" or maybe 1/2 a ring
is a bunch. My wife bought a small "bunch" (half a ring) a day or so
ago and it cost, in American terms, about 35 cents a pound.

By the way, most of the bananas here are green in color :-)

Anyhow, when I checked my register tape, I'd gotten three "sack
credits" even though everything would have fit into one bag. I don't
know what was different from the previous trip.

I didn't get yards of coupons this trip. That must have been unusual,
because on Thursday, the check-out commented on it as she was trying
to wind the tape up into something she could hand me.

---------------

I could check the envelope of register tapes to see when I went to
Marsh, but it's pushing midnight and I'm sure nobody cares when I
wrote the above.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #457  
Old July 10th 16, 03:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,185
Default AG: Twenty-first Century Switchel



8 July 2016

A while back I bought some Orzo salad, and thought that it would have
been much better if it had been made from real rice. Rice cooked the
way I usually cook it would be too sticky; I thought that I'd cook it
like pasta: boil in an excess of water, taste at intervals, drain
when al dente.

Today, needing exercise, I set off to ride to Pierceton's vestigial
farmers' market (one table fewer and it would have been a "farmer's
market"). The plan was to go out by Pierceton Road, and come back
through Sprawlmart, where I would (among other things) buy feta cheese
so that I could make rice salad.

The predicted rain didn't arrive and it was bright and sunny the whole
time I was out -- with a high of 85F. At four in the afternoon, the
traffic on Pierceton Road required too much attention to allow me to
sip constantly as the weather demanded, and on the way home I
frequently felt almost nauseated from drinking too much too seldom --
and from being dehydrated.

I reflected that water went down faster with a little something in it
-- I'd drunk diluted lemonade on the way out -- and thought that this
was an excuse to buy some of the fresh ginger I'd seen in the grocery.
I could cook ginger root in my drinking water; nineteenth-century
haying hands all agreed that putting ginger in your drinking water
kept it from upsetting your stomach.

Then I remembered that "boil whole grains, drain" was exactly the
recipe that I used to use to make barley water when
complex-carbohydrate drinks were all the rage. (I gave it up when I
learned that the carbs in the water coagulated when the drink was
frozen, and the curds clogged the valve of my bottle.)

Doctors put rice in drinking water for babies with cholera, to make
the water go into the dehydrated child instead of passing through.

So I think I'll boil my ginger in rice-cooking water.

I wonder whether rice water coagulates when frozen?

I just put all the remaining Black Japonica Rice in the fridge to soak
for three days -- this switchel is going to look like root beer. I'll
buy ginger root on my way back from tomorrow's farmers' markets.

I think I'll use fresh lemons instead of vinegar, and honey instead of
molasses.

We'll be well into July before I get it made, but we have all of
August to go.


9 July 2016

Grumble, gripe. I was reaching for the ginger root when I noticed
that it was USDA organic.

Principles can be inconvenient sometimes. I was tempted, but reflected
that even though I can't stop the amalgamation of church and state,
that's not a reason to help it along. This is not as big a pain as
passing up the only cultured butter I've ever seen: dried ginger is
what the haymakers had in mind anyway, and I already have some.

I think that I'll boil a lemon with the rice. Lemon would be good in
the salad. Boiling with acid might make the rice sweet, so I may
chicken out. [Definitely will chicken out: I like my lemons raw.]

The rice will be ready to boil on Monday. Grump. Sunday is for
walking, I'm washing clothes on Monday, and Weather Underground says
the rest of the week will be rainy.

Not rainy enough: the corn I got a close look at on the way home
yesterday appeared to be on the verge of curling.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #458  
Old July 11th 16, 12:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Twenty-first Century Switchel

On Sat, 09 Jul 2016 23:55:20 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:



8 July 2016

A while back I bought some Orzo salad, and thought that it would have
been much better if it had been made from real rice. Rice cooked the
way I usually cook it would be too sticky; I thought that I'd cook it
like pasta: boil in an excess of water, taste at intervals, drain
when al dente.


I talked to my resident rice expert and she says that to do what you
are talking about you boil the rice, as you say, when it is done to
your satisfaction then you drain off the boiling water and wash the
cooked rice in cold water several times. She says at least 2 or 3
times and she emphasized it must be COLD water, she even mentioned ice
cubes in the water.

Today, needing exercise, I set off to ride to Pierceton's vestigial
farmers' market (one table fewer and it would have been a "farmer's
market"). The plan was to go out by Pierceton Road, and come back
through Sprawlmart, where I would (among other things) buy feta cheese
so that I could make rice salad.

The predicted rain didn't arrive and it was bright and sunny the whole
time I was out -- with a high of 85F. At four in the afternoon, the
traffic on Pierceton Road required too much attention to allow me to
sip constantly as the weather demanded, and on the way home I
frequently felt almost nauseated from drinking too much too seldom --
and from being dehydrated.



I reflected that water went down faster with a little something in it
-- I'd drunk diluted lemonade on the way out -- and thought that this
was an excuse to buy some of the fresh ginger I'd seen in the grocery.
I could cook ginger root in my drinking water; nineteenth-century
haying hands all agreed that putting ginger in your drinking water
kept it from upsetting your stomach.


Here ginger is often suggested as a "sea-sick" medicine. When we
lived on the boat my wife used to chew it when we were at sea and it
seemed to work for her.

Do note that, here, at least, there are two types of ginger and
different kinds are used to cook different dishes. There is the "new
Ginger" which still has the juice in it and "old Ginger" which is just
the same ginger dried. As far as I can tell (what do I know about
cooking :-) they both have the same flavor but the new ginger has a
lot more "bite" to it.


Then I remembered that "boil whole grains, drain" was exactly the
recipe that I used to use to make barley water when
complex-carbohydrate drinks were all the rage. (I gave it up when I
learned that the carbs in the water coagulated when the drink was
frozen, and the curds clogged the valve of my bottle.)

Doctors put rice in drinking water for babies with cholera, to make
the water go into the dehydrated child instead of passing through.

So I think I'll boil my ginger in rice-cooking water.

I wonder whether rice water coagulates when frozen?

I just put all the remaining Black Japonica Rice in the fridge to soak
for three days -- this switchel is going to look like root beer. I'll
buy ginger root on my way back from tomorrow's farmers' markets.

I think I'll use fresh lemons instead of vinegar, and honey instead of
molasses.

We'll be well into July before I get it made, but we have all of
August to go.


9 July 2016

Grumble, gripe. I was reaching for the ginger root when I noticed
that it was USDA organic.

Principles can be inconvenient sometimes. I was tempted, but reflected
that even though I can't stop the amalgamation of church and state,
that's not a reason to help it along. This is not as big a pain as
passing up the only cultured butter I've ever seen: dried ginger is
what the haymakers had in mind anyway, and I already have some.


Again, over here, the exact same vegetable sold from a different table
without a "Organic" tag on it is much cheaper than that which is
labeled "organic".

I never realized how "with it" we must have been when I was a kid and
we had a garden. Heck, everything we grew was organic :-) Well, maybe
except the tomatoes which were sprayed with "Paris Green" for the
tomato worms but veggies should be washed anyway

I think that I'll boil a lemon with the rice. Lemon would be good in
the salad. Boiling with acid might make the rice sweet, so I may
chicken out. [Definitely will chicken out: I like my lemons raw.]

The rice will be ready to boil on Monday. Grump. Sunday is for
walking, I'm washing clothes on Monday, and Weather Underground says
the rest of the week will be rainy.

Not rainy enough: the corn I got a close look at on the way home
yesterday appeared to be on the verge of curling.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #459  
Old July 12th 16, 04:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,434
Default AG: Twenty-first Century Switchel

On 7/9/2016 10:55 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:


8 July 2016

A while back I bought some Orzo salad, and thought that it would have
been much better if it had been made from real rice. Rice cooked the
way I usually cook it would be too sticky; I thought that I'd cook it
like pasta: boil in an excess of water, taste at intervals, drain
when al dente.

Today, needing exercise, I set off to ride to Pierceton's vestigial
farmers' market (one table fewer and it would have been a "farmer's
market"). The plan was to go out by Pierceton Road, and come back
through Sprawlmart, where I would (among other things) buy feta cheese
so that I could make rice salad.

The predicted rain didn't arrive and it was bright and sunny the whole
time I was out -- with a high of 85F. At four in the afternoon, the
traffic on Pierceton Road required too much attention to allow me to
sip constantly as the weather demanded, and on the way home I
frequently felt almost nauseated from drinking too much too seldom --
and from being dehydrated.

I reflected that water went down faster with a little something in it
-- I'd drunk diluted lemonade on the way out -- and thought that this
was an excuse to buy some of the fresh ginger I'd seen in the grocery.
I could cook ginger root in my drinking water; nineteenth-century
haying hands all agreed that putting ginger in your drinking water
kept it from upsetting your stomach.

Then I remembered that "boil whole grains, drain" was exactly the
recipe that I used to use to make barley water when
complex-carbohydrate drinks were all the rage. (I gave it up when I
learned that the carbs in the water coagulated when the drink was
frozen, and the curds clogged the valve of my bottle.)

Doctors put rice in drinking water for babies with cholera, to make
the water go into the dehydrated child instead of passing through.

So I think I'll boil my ginger in rice-cooking water.

I wonder whether rice water coagulates when frozen?

I just put all the remaining Black Japonica Rice in the fridge to soak
for three days -- this switchel is going to look like root beer. I'll
buy ginger root on my way back from tomorrow's farmers' markets.

I think I'll use fresh lemons instead of vinegar, and honey instead of
molasses.

We'll be well into July before I get it made, but we have all of
August to go.


9 July 2016

Grumble, gripe. I was reaching for the ginger root when I noticed
that it was USDA organic.

Principles can be inconvenient sometimes. I was tempted, but reflected
that even though I can't stop the amalgamation of church and state,
that's not a reason to help it along. This is not as big a pain as
passing up the only cultured butter I've ever seen: dried ginger is
what the haymakers had in mind anyway, and I already have some.

I think that I'll boil a lemon with the rice. Lemon would be good in
the salad. Boiling with acid might make the rice sweet, so I may
chicken out. [Definitely will chicken out: I like my lemons raw.]

The rice will be ready to boil on Monday. Grump. Sunday is for
walking, I'm washing clothes on Monday, and Weather Underground says
the rest of the week will be rainy.

Not rainy enough: the corn I got a close look at on the way home
yesterday appeared to be on the verge of curling.


Speaking of rice and cycling:

http://www.bonappetit.com/entertaini...e-cyclist-food


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #460  
Old July 13th 16, 03:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,185
Default AG: Twenty-first Century Switchel

On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 06:28:12 +0700, John B.
wrote:

I talked to my resident rice expert and she says that to do what you
are talking about you boil the rice, as you say, when it is done to
your satisfaction then you drain off the boiling water and wash the
cooked rice in cold water several times. She says at least 2 or 3
times and she emphasized it must be COLD water, she even mentioned ice
cubes in the water.


I did run a little cold water over the rice, but not a lot. Black
Japonica has a hull on it; I suspect that the ice-water suggestion is
for white rice.

It was silly of me to experiment with Black Japonica, because I'll
probably never see another package of it -- but it did get rid of the
little dab that was left. Black Japonica makes great porcupine* loaf,
but I no longer put starch in my meatloaf. Minced vegetables work
great.

(*My personal term for meat loaf made with rice instead of bread,
because of a rice-meatball recipe teen-age cooks adored in the
fifties.)

The salad turned out well as far as the rice goes, but needs a little
more spice. I think that tomorrow, if I can stand to set foot outside
(It *will* be four Fahrenheit degrees cooler.), I'll pick the youngest
pods off the mustard plants and stir them in.

It was better when I tasted it just now than it was this morning; the
flavor of the feta has had a chance to spread.


On Sat, 09 Jul 2016 23:55:20 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:



9 July 2016

Grumble, gripe. I was reaching for the ginger root when I noticed
that it was USDA organic.


I couldn't find horseradish either, but when I stopped at Marsh on the
way back from today's impromptu trip to the dentist, I found both pure
horseradish and fresh ginger. And the bagged radishes I'd looked for
in vain on my last few trips to Owen's. It says "red radish" on the
receipt; I'll have to look around on my next trip to Marsh (in August,
please!) to see what other colors Marsh sells.

Here, "ginger" means ground dry ginger, mostly used in a sweet spice
cake we call "gingerbread"; fresh roots are intermittently available,
and it's only in this century that fresh ginger has been available at
all. There's usually a sign up saying that it's good in oriental
dishes.

I put two teaspoons of ground ginger in a quart of switchel. It
smelled like a lot when I put it in, but I can't taste it in the
finished product. I also added a squirt of honey, but all I can taste
is rice. I plan to add the lemon at the last minute, since we have a
stick blender, it won't have to marinate like the slices of lemon in
the water for today's trip. One bottle going, one coming, about two
and a half miles each way. I undressed into the washing machine and
took a shower.

(It turned out, by the way, that the chip was a piece of my temporary
bridge, not my tooth. Dr. slapped a patch on it and we hope it will
hold until September. I promised to cut my sandwiches into pieces in
the meantime.)

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


 




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