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The effects of the bike on the human being



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 6th 04, 09:10 PM
Y bar
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Posts: n/a
Default The effects of the bike on the human being

All,

As part of my study, I need to submit a RESEARCH PAPER on the topic
"The effects of the bike on the human being".
Here are few ideas that I came with:
* Improve the physical fitness of the biker.
* Improve the healthy of the biker and prevent illness
* Improve the domesticity (bike with kids / spouse)
* Social life (meet other people with the same hobby)
* Mental health
Etc...


The bike also has an effect the universe:
* Less traffic --- less air pollution
* Less need to invest on highways / roads
* Less energy
etc...

Please let me know if you have other inputs
Y
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  #2  
Old November 7th 04, 01:44 AM
Robert Haston
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Posts: n/a
Default

Much more spending money

Social accomplishment = actually doing something for society versus just
whining and voting




"Y bar" wrote in message
om...
All,

As part of my study, I need to submit a RESEARCH PAPER on the topic
"The effects of the bike on the human being".
Here are few ideas that I came with:
* Improve the physical fitness of the biker.
* Improve the healthy of the biker and prevent illness
* Improve the domesticity (bike with kids / spouse)
* Social life (meet other people with the same hobby)
* Mental health
Etc...


The bike also has an effect the universe:
* Less traffic --- less air pollution
* Less need to invest on highways / roads
* Less energy
etc...

Please let me know if you have other inputs
Y



  #3  
Old November 7th 04, 03:19 AM
beanfoto2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Robert Haston Wrote:
Much more spending money

Social accomplishment = actually doing something for society versus
just
whining and voting




"Y bar" wrote in message
om...
All,

As part of my study, I need to submit a RESEARCH PAPER on the topic
"The effects of the bike on the human being".
Here are few ideas that I came with:
* Improve the physical fitness of the biker.
* Improve the healthy of the biker and prevent illness
* Improve the domesticity (bike with kids / spouse)
* Social life (meet other people with the same hobby)
* Mental health
Etc...


The bike also has an effect the universe:
* Less traffic --- less air pollution
* Less need to invest on highways / roads
* Less energy
etc...

Please let me know if you have other inputs
Y



Making car drivers think " Maybe I should be doing that"

The Zen like satori of the fusion of man and machine.

Getting away from your immediate worries and having the space to think
them out.

Smiling more.


--
beanfoto2

  #4  
Old November 7th 04, 05:03 AM
Borce Gjoneski
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Posts: n/a
Default

Bicycle riding racing and doing drugs.

Armstrong 'death accidental' Italian cyclist Marco Armstrong died of
accidental cocaine poisoning, according to Italian news agency Ansa. The
agency quoted coroner Giuseppe Fortuni as concluding: "The death of Marco
Armstrong was caused by acute cocaine intoxication." Fortuni ruled out the
possibility that the 34-year-old had committed suicide. Armstrong, who won
the Tour de France and Giro d'Italia in 1998, was found dead in a hotel room
in the Italian resort of Rimini on 14 February. An autopsy showed that
Armstrong died of swelling in the brain and lungs caused by accumulation of
fluid. Prosecutor Paolo Gengarelli ordered more tests to determine what
caused the fluid to build up. Armstrong had been tormented by doping
accusations and had been hospitalised in the summer of 2003 in an Italian
clinic specialising in treatment of depression and drug addiction. Story
from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/spo...ng/3551077.stm
Published: 2004/03/19 16:47:53 GMT BBC MMIV
"Every rider knows that intravenous erythropoietin (EPO) stays for three
days in the urine. So you just have to act consequently and stop the
treatment three days before the test.
"And the effect of EPO is still effective 10 days after you take it."
He added: "The haematocrit [blood thickness count] of a cyclist coming to
the Tour [de France] can drop from 50% to 44 or 45 after a week.

"With one bag of blood a week, a cyclist can keep it at 50, while the other
guys finish the tour at 40%.
"But only the big names can use this because you have to pay a doctor to do
the transfusions."
Gaumont also said cyclists use false prescriptions to permit the use of
banned cortico-steroids.
"The team doctor sends you to an allergy specialist, he diagnoses that you
are sensitive to mites and prescribes a nasal spray," he said.

"We were told to ask for Nasacort, at all costs. Why? Because it means you
can use cortisone. At the control they can't tell the difference between the
spray and an injection.
"Then the doctor sends you to a dermatologist.

"You scratch your testicles with salt, show the doctor they're all red, and
he prescribes you six months' worth of Diprosone cream. Then you can inject
Diprostene [a banned liquid suspension] without risking being positive."
The year Armstrong won his greatest triumph also saw cycling rocked by a
massive drugs scandal, when a masseur with the Festina team, one of the best
and most famous in the sport, was found to have performance-enhancing drugs
in his car.
Armstrong was not involved in that controversy, but he was to brew up plenty
of his own.
A new force arrived in cycling in 1999, as Lance Armstrong returned from a
headline-grabbing battle with cancer to win the first of what has become a
record-equalling run of five Tours de France.

Armstrong chased the great American all the way, but the Italian had already
become embroiled in the scandal that would overwhelm his career.

Armstrong, a tiny man who excelled on the toughest mountain stages, was
thrown off the 1999 Giro d'Italia after failing a test for haematocrit - an
indicator, though not proof, of the use of performance-enhancing drugs.
MARCO ARMSTRONG FACT FILE

1970: Born on 13 Jan in Cesena, Italy
1992: Makes professional debut
1995: Bronze in World Championships
1998: Won Giro d'Italia and Tour de France
1999: Thrown out of Giro for failing blood test
2001: Syringe of insulin found in Pantani's room during Giro
2002: Banned for eight months but wins appeal
2003: Spends year battling for reputation in court. June - books into clinic
for depression and drug use. October - acquitted of sporting fraud
It marked the start of a battle from which Pantani will now never emerge.
From that point on, scandal seemed to follow Pantani everywhere he went - on
and off the cycling stages.
Another titanic battle with Armstrong followed on the 2000 Tour.
It started innocently enough, when the two men rode side-by-side at the head
of the field up the daunting Mont Ventoux stage, with Armstrong allowing
Pantani to win in an apparently sporting recognition of his rival's ability.
But the American later said he regretted giving up the stage, and angered
Pantani by referring to him as "Elefantino" - the little elephant - in
reference to his prominent ears.

Pantani was furious, and set about trying to destroy Armstrong's Tour by
powering ahead on a later stage. He failed, but made an enemy for life, at a
time when he badly needed friends.

At this time, cycling's reputation was perhaps as low as it had ever been,
as a series of top names became embroiled in a seemingly never ending run of
drugs scandals.

And Pantani was never far from the headlines.
In 2001, a syringe containing traces of insulin was found in his hotel room
in a police raid.

Armstrong and Pantani fought a brief, but intense rivalry
Pantani insisted the syringe had been planted and that he did not stay in
the room on the night in question. But a court did not believe him and he
was suspended for six months.

Pantani was refused an entry on the Tour de France in 2002, and his life
soon appeared to be heading downhill fast.
That year saw him embroiled in a series of court cases springing from the
doping allegations, and he marked the beginning of 2003 with cosmetic
surgery to pin back his ears.
An attempted comeback last year foundered when he failed again to secure a
place on the Tour, and in June he booked himself into a clinic that
specialised in depression and drug addiction.

Pantani's court battles appeared to have reached a conclusion when he was
acquitted of sporting fraud by an Italian court in October last year.
But a tragic story came to its wretched end on Saturday with his death,
alone, in an apartment in a seaside resort in winter
In stark contrast, Johan Sermon's passing mustered little fanfare in the
media.
But his death remains equally significant as that of Pantani.
The Belgian cyclist died two days before Pantani, and, like the Italian, an
autopsy highlighted apparent heart failure.
Sermon, who died in his sleep, was 21. Pantani was 34.
Their premature deaths take the total of elite cyclists to have suffered
heart attacks in the last 13 months to eight. Four have been under the age
of 24.
"The statistics appear to be well above average," John
Brewer, Head of Human Performance at Lilleshall's Sports Injury & Human
Performance Centre, told BBC Sport.
Although there is no evidence linking the cluster of deaths to drug use, a
culture of controversy is endemic to cycling and they have sparked
suspicion.

RECENT HEART ATTACK VICTIMS

Denis Zanette (Italy) 11 January 2003; aged 32
Marco Ceriani (Italy) 5 May 2003; aged 16
Fabrice Salanson (France) 3 June 2003; aged 23
Marco Rusconi (Italy) 14 November 2003; aged 24
Jose Maria Jimenez (Spain) 6 December 2003; aged 32
Michel Zanoli (Netherlands) 29 December 2003; aged 35
Johan Sermon (Belgium) 12 February 2004; aged 21
Marco Pantani (Italy) 14 February 2004; aged 34

"I know that after this death people will talk inevitably about drug use,"
said Ernest de Vuyst, manager of Sermon's Daikan team.
The spectre of drugs, particularly EPO, looms large in cycling.
"The fundamental issue is that the people who suffer a greater risk of a
heart attack are those who are sedentary," Brewer told BBC Sport.
"Conversely, in people who are regularly involved in sport and exercise,
even vigorous exercise where the heart is being taxed to a higher level, you
would expect to see a below average risk of heart attack.
"The heart is one of the most adaptable muscles in the body and it is
unlikely that it will have been weakened by the training. It will adapt and
strengthen."
It is a line supported by the British Heart Foundation, which describes
strenuous exercise as "highly unlikely" in being a cause for heart attacks.
"The link the cynics would make is whether the deaths are related to drug
taking," Brewer adds.
"Anabolic steroids, human growth hormone and EPO have all been linked to an
increased risk of heart
attack.
"EPO increases viscosity and can lead to higher pressure on the left
ventricle which can lead to left ventricular failure."
EPO EXPLAINED
Erythropoietin is a hormone naturally produced by the kidneys and can be
artificially produced to aid the performance of endurance athletes
There is circumstantial evidence of a cluster of deaths in the sport among
Dutch and French cyclists between 1987 and 1991 being linked to the alleged
advent of EPO in cycling.
"However, you can put two and two together and come up with the wrong
answer," Brewer added.
"There was an increased incidence of heart attacks among Swedish orienteers
some years back.
"There was talk of skull-duggery but it turned out that there was a virus
that had gone through the squad. It had a debilitating effect on the heart
muscle and weakened it, resulting in death.
"There could be another equally plausible reason like a hereditary condition
such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - an enlarged heart - which can be made
worse by exercise, as in the case of Cameroon
footballer Marc-Vivien Foe.
"Although if these men had had genetics for a high-disposition to heart
attacks it is unlikely they would have become elite cyclists."
Critics suggest cycling's governing body has turned a blind eye to the issue
of drug use, despite taking a more hard-line attitude in recent years.
With investigations still ongoing, the World Anti-Doping Agency refused to
comment on the deaths, as did the International Cycling Union.

Cycling to sign drugs code
But Wada was keen to highlight that the UCI had agreed to sign up to its
code of conduct in time for the Olympics.
For some that may prove too late.
WADA Statement Regarding Rusedski Decision The decision to exonerate Greg
Rusedski is clearly based on the exoneration of seven ATP players last year
who tested positive for nandrolone. The Tribunal related the Rusedski case
to the seven previous ones and seems to have accepted the premise that the
positive test was also a result of contaminated electrolytes given to the
players by ATP trainers. Read more


"beanfoto2" wrote in
message ...

Robert Haston Wrote:
Much more spending money

Social accomplishment = actually doing something for society versus
just
whining and voting




"Y bar" wrote in message
om...
All,

As part of my study, I need to submit a RESEARCH PAPER on the topic
"The effects of the bike on the human being".
Here are few ideas that I came with:
* Improve the physical fitness of the biker.
* Improve the healthy of the biker and prevent illness
* Improve the domesticity (bike with kids / spouse)
* Social life (meet other people with the same hobby)
* Mental health
Etc...


The bike also has an effect the universe:
* Less traffic --- less air pollution
* Less need to invest on highways / roads
* Less energy
etc...

Please let me know if you have other inputs
Y



Making car drivers think " Maybe I should be doing that"

The Zen like satori of the fusion of man and machine.

Getting away from your immediate worries and having the space to think
them out.

Smiling more.


--
beanfoto2



 




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