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How to use those CO2 inflators



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 11th 19, 01:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
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Posts: 158
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy
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  #2  
Old July 11th 19, 08:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
au76666
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Posts: 3
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?

--
Dieter Britz
  #3  
Old July 11th 19, 01:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 581
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 07:50:14 +0000, au76666 wrote:

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


Availability?


  #4  
Old July 11th 19, 03:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
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Posts: 7,355
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 3:50:16 AM UTC-4, au76666 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


I think it's because CO2 can be held as a liquid at room temperature and moderate
pressure. As a liquid, a lot more CO2 can be stored in a tiny steel bottle.
Storing an equivalent volume of air would require super cooling or extreme pressure.

But I'm not a chemist. No guarantee is expressed or implied.

- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old July 11th 19, 04:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
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Posts: 1,336
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

au76666 writes:

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


When compressed in an inflator cartridge CO2 becomes a liquid (or a
supercritical fluid of similar density, above 31C). This allows a
large molar amount to be stored at a reasonable pressure.

Dry air, or N2 in the product Hizzoner Scharf linked a few days ago,
behaves much like an ideal gas near room temperature even under
considerable pressure, so storing a similar molar amount of it would
require much higher pressure, and a stronger and heavier cartridge.



  #6  
Old July 11th 19, 11:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 158
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 9:58:53 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 3:50:16 AM UTC-4, au76666 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


I think it's because CO2 can be held as a liquid at room temperature and moderate
pressure. As a liquid, a lot more CO2 can be stored in a tiny steel bottle.
Storing an equivalent volume of air would require super cooling or extreme pressure.

But I'm not a chemist. No guarantee is expressed or implied.

- Frank Krygowski


The company got back with me.

Those cylinders are under 1000 lbs of pressure.

So, it blows right past the needle valve of your inner tube.

Andy

I would be guessing that once opened and attached, it has a very short life before all leaking out.
  #7  
Old July 11th 19, 11:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 502
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 07:50:14 -0000 (UTC), au76666
wrote:

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


You can certainly use plain air. The device used to obtain plain air
under pressure is termed a "pump" and I'm sure that your local bike
shop can outfit you with one.
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #8  
Old July 12th 19, 12:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,669
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 6:50:22 PM UTC-4, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 07:50:14 -0000 (UTC), au76666
wrote:

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy


Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


You can certainly use plain air. The device used to obtain plain air
under pressure is termed a "pump" and I'm sure that your local bike
shop can outfit you with one.
--

Cheers,

John B.


+1 Love it!

Cheers
  #9  
Old July 12th 19, 12:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 502
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 15:37:39 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 9:58:53 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 3:50:16 AM UTC-4, au76666 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy

Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?


I think it's because CO2 can be held as a liquid at room temperature and moderate
pressure. As a liquid, a lot more CO2 can be stored in a tiny steel bottle.
Storing an equivalent volume of air would require super cooling or extreme pressure.

But I'm not a chemist. No guarantee is expressed or implied.

- Frank Krygowski


The company got back with me.

Those cylinders are under 1000 lbs of pressure.

So, it blows right past the needle valve of your inner tube.

Andy

I would be guessing that once opened and attached, it has a very short life before all leaking out.



CO2 liquefies at different temperatures and pressured. At 70 degrees
CO2 obtains a gas pressure of 852.8 psi when confined in a vessel.
Much more explanations at

https://www.justanswer.com/general/0...cartridge.html


--

Cheers,

John B.
  #10  
Old July 12th 19, 07:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 158
Default How to use those CO2 inflators

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 6:56:21 PM UTC-5, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 15:37:39 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 9:58:53 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 3:50:16 AM UTC-4, au76666 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:56:13 -0700, AK wrote:

I bought a package of CO2 inflator which clearly states it works on
Presta And Schrader valves.

It has nothing to depress the needle part of the inner tube valve to
allow the gas in?

Thanks,
Andy

Why, btw, is CO2 used? Why not plain air?

I think it's because CO2 can be held as a liquid at room temperature and moderate
pressure. As a liquid, a lot more CO2 can be stored in a tiny steel bottle.
Storing an equivalent volume of air would require super cooling or extreme pressure.

But I'm not a chemist. No guarantee is expressed or implied.

- Frank Krygowski


The company got back with me.

Those cylinders are under 1000 lbs of pressure.

So, it blows right past the needle valve of your inner tube.

Andy

I would be guessing that once opened and attached, it has a very short life before all leaking out.



CO2 liquefies at different temperatures and pressured. At 70 degrees
CO2 obtains a gas pressure of 852.8 psi when confined in a vessel.
Much more explanations at

https://www.justanswer.com/general/0...cartridge.html


--

Cheers,

John B.


Guess you missed my post about those cylinders putting out 1000 psi.

Andy
 




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