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  #1  
Old October 16th 19, 06:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 1,045
Default Redline Conquest

I have a Redline Conquest which is a Cross bike. As far as I can tell the only difference between a cross, gravel and road bike is the bottom bracket being slightly higher on the first two.

It is a disk brake bike and I have a friend coming next year and need to build him a rider. He is a roady.

When I first built this bike there were no hydraulic road levers available so I made it a flat bar bike with MTB components. I spoke before about how dangerous disk brake bikes are but on a road bike they should be more manageable since you have longer sight lines and can plan your braking.

The bike will of course be Campy so I've been trying to find 11 speed hydraulic levers. I can get Potenza levers but they have the "cheap" Campy problem of only shifting one gear up at a time.

So my plan is to get a Chorus or Record set of used levers now that everyone is changing over to 12 speeds and to install a Potenza rear derailleur and 11-32 cassette. I could get this fairly easily for Shimano but Campy doesn't believe that lower gears are for real men.

One of the questions I have, and can't find the answer for, is whether the Chorus or Record levers will work with the Potenza rear derailleur. So as I'm building it I have to learn that.

The Redline is aluminum and it will be lighter than Mike's custom steel Tomasinni so my plan is to put the Fulcrum tubeless tires and disk brakes on them to give him a dose of modern technology which he has spend the last several years denying is worthwhile. While I happen to think that tubeless is the only way to go on California roads, I see disks as bad. They put all of the braking loads in the incorrect areas of the bike and lord knows what will happen in the future. We've already seen them having to move the sizes of the axles up 2 mm and to eliminate the real quick release function.

But for a sports rider I suppose you can look up-to-date without having any problems.

As I build it I'll keep the string going.
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  #2  
Old October 16th 19, 07:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,298
Default Redline Conquest

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 10:12:32 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have a Redline Conquest which is a Cross bike. As far as I can tell the only difference between a cross, gravel and road bike is the bottom bracket being slightly higher on the first two.


There are other geometry differences between the three besides BB height, including chain stay length, head and seat tube angles,steering geometry and tire clearance.

It is a disk brake bike and I have a friend coming next year and need to build him a rider. He is a roady.

When I first built this bike there were no hydraulic road levers available so I made it a flat bar bike with MTB components. I spoke before about how dangerous disk brake bikes are but on a road bike they should be more manageable since you have longer sight lines and can plan your braking.


Dangerous for you, but not the rest of the world.


The bike will of course be Campy so I've been trying to find 11 speed hydraulic levers. I can get Potenza levers but they have the "cheap" Campy problem of only shifting one gear up at a time.


Why will it be a Campy? Buy a 105 11sp hydro group and call it good.

So my plan is to get a Chorus or Record set of used levers now that everyone is changing over to 12 speeds and to install a Potenza rear derailleur and 11-32 cassette. I could get this fairly easily for Shimano but Campy doesn't believe that lower gears are for real men.


Buy Shimano and skip the headache. Re-sale will be better for the CX market..

One of the questions I have, and can't find the answer for, is whether the Chorus or Record levers will work with the Potenza rear derailleur. So as I'm building it I have to learn that.


The Redline is aluminum and it will be lighter than Mike's custom steel Tomasinni so my plan is to put the Fulcrum tubeless tires and disk brakes on them to give him a dose of modern technology which he has spend the last several years denying is worthwhile. While I happen to think that tubeless is the only way to go on California roads, I see disks as bad. They put all of the braking loads in the incorrect areas of the bike and lord knows what will happen in the future. We've already seen them having to move the sizes of the axles up 2 mm and to eliminate the real quick release function.


The rest of the world manages. I commute on discs every day, and they're the only thing I ride for wet weather weekend riding. IMO, a front through-axle is as quick or quicker than a QR with lawyer lips when it comes to fixing flats. Rear is probably slower. The bike racks at my building have lots of disc-brake bikes ridden by ordinary commuter goons who aren't killing themselves.

BTW, why all the effort? Don't you have three or four road bikes? Give him one of those and skip the rebuild. Sell the CX bike if you're not using it.

My disc CX is my commuter, so it gets lots of use. It's also a pig and not much fun to ride compared to the gravel bike or road bike. I don't like Cannondale's choice of steering angle, which is counter the usual steep CX front end. It's too slack and gives the front end a super heavy feeling. I got the frame as a warranty replacement and it came with the new "out front" geometry along with BB30, a different HS standard and other stuff I had to accommodate during my rebuild. The front disc is, in fact, a little soft, and I'll have to attend to that. It's probably a dirty pad, or I need to juice it up a little. I rebuilt that caliper, and I'm hoping its not a leak -- which I doubt.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #3  
Old October 16th 19, 07:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 1,045
Default Redline Conquest

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:14:24 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 10:12:32 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have a Redline Conquest which is a Cross bike. As far as I can tell the only difference between a cross, gravel and road bike is the bottom bracket being slightly higher on the first two.


There are other geometry differences between the three besides BB height, including chain stay length, head and seat tube angles,steering geometry and tire clearance.

It is a disk brake bike and I have a friend coming next year and need to build him a rider. He is a roady.

When I first built this bike there were no hydraulic road levers available so I made it a flat bar bike with MTB components. I spoke before about how dangerous disk brake bikes are but on a road bike they should be more manageable since you have longer sight lines and can plan your braking.


Dangerous for you, but not the rest of the world.


The bike will of course be Campy so I've been trying to find 11 speed hydraulic levers. I can get Potenza levers but they have the "cheap" Campy problem of only shifting one gear up at a time.


Why will it be a Campy? Buy a 105 11sp hydro group and call it good.

So my plan is to get a Chorus or Record set of used levers now that everyone is changing over to 12 speeds and to install a Potenza rear derailleur and 11-32 cassette. I could get this fairly easily for Shimano but Campy doesn't believe that lower gears are for real men.


Buy Shimano and skip the headache. Re-sale will be better for the CX market.

One of the questions I have, and can't find the answer for, is whether the Chorus or Record levers will work with the Potenza rear derailleur. So as I'm building it I have to learn that.


The Redline is aluminum and it will be lighter than Mike's custom steel Tomasinni so my plan is to put the Fulcrum tubeless tires and disk brakes on them to give him a dose of modern technology which he has spend the last several years denying is worthwhile. While I happen to think that tubeless is the only way to go on California roads, I see disks as bad. They put all of the braking loads in the incorrect areas of the bike and lord knows what will happen in the future. We've already seen them having to move the sizes of the axles up 2 mm and to eliminate the real quick release function.


The rest of the world manages. I commute on discs every day, and they're the only thing I ride for wet weather weekend riding. IMO, a front through-axle is as quick or quicker than a QR with lawyer lips when it comes to fixing flats. Rear is probably slower. The bike racks at my building have lots of disc-brake bikes ridden by ordinary commuter goons who aren't killing themselves.

BTW, why all the effort? Don't you have three or four road bikes? Give him one of those and skip the rebuild. Sell the CX bike if you're not using it.

My disc CX is my commuter, so it gets lots of use. It's also a pig and not much fun to ride compared to the gravel bike or road bike. I don't like Cannondale's choice of steering angle, which is counter the usual steep CX front end. It's too slack and gives the front end a super heavy feeling. I got the frame as a warranty replacement and it came with the new "out front" geometry along with BB30, a different HS standard and other stuff I had to accommodate during my rebuild. The front disc is, in fact, a little soft, and I'll have to attend to that. It's probably a dirty pad, or I need to juice it up a little. I rebuilt that caliper, and I'm hoping its not a leak -- which I doubt.


The measurements on the cross bikes and the steel road bikes I have are almost identical. While the top tube length on the cross bikes a very slightly shorter the fork angle is slightly larger putting the rider about the same position between the wheels and slightly closer to the BB center. This puts the tiniest higher proportion of weight over the front wheel on the cross bike.

On the Redline you can't tell but on the Ridley it is clear that you are better positioned for more upright riding.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik...999381664.html

Everyone always grinds lawyer's lips off as a first order of maintenance. The Pros no longer use disk brake bikes if they believe that their course will cause flats. And then have a same size teammate riding with them so that they merely change bikes. The Mavic neutral support cars only carry rim brake wheels since all of the others are non-standard. Its difficult enough with 11-12 and 14 speed wheels with Shimano and Campy spacing.

Which reminds me - On four separate occasions now I have been descending in high gear and the chain has jumped the cassette to the outside of the small cog. I have checked the limit screws and they are set properly. Since this is one of those super-expensive Connnex chains, I ordered a 10 speed chain but I wonder if I got an 11 speed which is a whole lot more flexible and more likely to throw off a 10 speed cassette. Since the cassette is 11-29 I use a medium arm rear derailleur. I suppose I could cut a link out of the chain but right now it cross chains beautifully and with no discernable drag.

  #4  
Old October 16th 19, 09:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,298
Default Redline Conquest

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:59:37 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:14:24 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 10:12:32 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have a Redline Conquest which is a Cross bike. As far as I can tell the only difference between a cross, gravel and road bike is the bottom bracket being slightly higher on the first two.


There are other geometry differences between the three besides BB height, including chain stay length, head and seat tube angles,steering geometry and tire clearance.

It is a disk brake bike and I have a friend coming next year and need to build him a rider. He is a roady.

When I first built this bike there were no hydraulic road levers available so I made it a flat bar bike with MTB components. I spoke before about how dangerous disk brake bikes are but on a road bike they should be more manageable since you have longer sight lines and can plan your braking.


Dangerous for you, but not the rest of the world.


The bike will of course be Campy so I've been trying to find 11 speed hydraulic levers. I can get Potenza levers but they have the "cheap" Campy problem of only shifting one gear up at a time.


Why will it be a Campy? Buy a 105 11sp hydro group and call it good.

So my plan is to get a Chorus or Record set of used levers now that everyone is changing over to 12 speeds and to install a Potenza rear derailleur and 11-32 cassette. I could get this fairly easily for Shimano but Campy doesn't believe that lower gears are for real men.


Buy Shimano and skip the headache. Re-sale will be better for the CX market.

One of the questions I have, and can't find the answer for, is whether the Chorus or Record levers will work with the Potenza rear derailleur. So as I'm building it I have to learn that.


The Redline is aluminum and it will be lighter than Mike's custom steel Tomasinni so my plan is to put the Fulcrum tubeless tires and disk brakes on them to give him a dose of modern technology which he has spend the last several years denying is worthwhile. While I happen to think that tubeless is the only way to go on California roads, I see disks as bad. They put all of the braking loads in the incorrect areas of the bike and lord knows what will happen in the future. We've already seen them having to move the sizes of the axles up 2 mm and to eliminate the real quick release function..


The rest of the world manages. I commute on discs every day, and they're the only thing I ride for wet weather weekend riding. IMO, a front through-axle is as quick or quicker than a QR with lawyer lips when it comes to fixing flats. Rear is probably slower. The bike racks at my building have lots of disc-brake bikes ridden by ordinary commuter goons who aren't killing themselves.

BTW, why all the effort? Don't you have three or four road bikes? Give him one of those and skip the rebuild. Sell the CX bike if you're not using it.

My disc CX is my commuter, so it gets lots of use. It's also a pig and not much fun to ride compared to the gravel bike or road bike. I don't like Cannondale's choice of steering angle, which is counter the usual steep CX front end. It's too slack and gives the front end a super heavy feeling. I got the frame as a warranty replacement and it came with the new "out front" geometry along with BB30, a different HS standard and other stuff I had to accommodate during my rebuild. The front disc is, in fact, a little soft, and I'll have to attend to that. It's probably a dirty pad, or I need to juice it up a little. I rebuilt that caliper, and I'm hoping its not a leak -- which I doubt.


The measurements on the cross bikes and the steel road bikes I have are almost identical. While the top tube length on the cross bikes a very slightly shorter the fork angle is slightly larger putting the rider about the same position between the wheels and slightly closer to the BB center. This puts the tiniest higher proportion of weight over the front wheel on the cross bike.


That could be. Steel road bikes of yore in large sizes had ****ty geometry with too-short top-tubes and often ridiculously steep geometry. My CX bike has different geometry than my modern road bike(s) and gravel bike.

On the Redline you can't tell but on the Ridley it is clear that you are better positioned for more upright riding.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik...999381664.html

Everyone always grinds lawyer's lips off as a first order of maintenance.


Really? On CF forks? Not me.

The Pros no longer use disk brake bikes if they believe that their course will cause flats. And then have a same size teammate riding with them so that they merely change bikes. The Mavic neutral support cars only carry rim brake wheels since all of the others are non-standard. Its difficult enough with 11-12 and 14 speed wheels with Shimano and Campy spacing.

Well, that's wrong. Even on the Paris Roubaix flat-fest, many pros were riding discs, including winner Philippe Gilbert. https://road.cc/content/tech-news/25...alized-roubaix That makes sense since you can run 28mm tires easily on a disc frame -- or 30mm even. Mavic carries neutral support bikes and some disc wheels.

None of this matters for mortals JRA. The time differential between fixing a rear flat on my through-axle Synapse and my rim-brake Emonda is negligible.

Which reminds me - On four separate occasions now I have been descending in high gear and the chain has jumped the cassette to the outside of the small cog. I have checked the limit screws and they are set properly. Since this is one of those super-expensive Connnex chains, I ordered a 10 speed chain but I wonder if I got an 11 speed which is a whole lot more flexible and more likely to throw off a 10 speed cassette. Since the cassette is 11-29 I use a medium arm rear derailleur. I suppose I could cut a link out of the chain but right now it cross chains beautifully and with no discernable drag.


Too much chain or inadequate tension on the cage. You need a new Shimano rear derailleur with a clutch! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWKielVcCqk But who knows, maybe it could be due to a mismatched chain/cassette.

-- Jay Beattie.


  #5  
Old October 16th 19, 11:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,537
Default Redline Conquest

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 3:12:32 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:59:37 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
Everyone always grinds lawyer's lips off as a first order of maintenance.


Really? On CF forks? Not me.

-- Jay Beattie.


As much as it pains me, I'll sort of agree with Tom on this. On all but one of my bikes I have ground off the tabs on the fork ends. The only fork I did not grind off is a carbon fork with an aero blade so the fork end is about 2 inches long. Can't grind that much metal off. All my carbon forks have aluminum dropouts, not carbon dropouts. So grinding is safe.

Which brings up an irritation. With no fork tabs, you do not have to unscrew the dropout nut. Just flip the lever and the wheel falls out and goes back in perfectly. But sometimes when getting rides from friends, they will take the front wheel off my bike to put it on a rack. And when they take the front wheel off, the very first thing they do is start unscrewing the quick release nut. Which messes up my quick release width and I have to then readjust the dang thing when putting the wheel back on. Most bicyclists have been made stupid and dumb from this dumb fork tab feature. They no longer know how to correctly remove a front wheel on a bicycle.
  #6  
Old October 18th 19, 03:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Zen Cycle
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Posts: 191
Default Redline Conquest

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 2:59:37 PM UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:

The Pros no longer use disk brake bikes if they believe that their
course will cause flats.


Gee skippy, still getting Andre to do your research, I see.....(hint: he's not very good at it)

Scroll through this photo gallery and you'll see more than half the peloton is using disc brakes:

http://www.steephill.tv/2019/paris-r...hotos/page-01/

so I guess the pros aren't worried about flats at Paris Roubaix?

And then have a same size teammate riding with them so that they
merely change bikes.


not always - Esteban Chaves in the 2019 Vuelta:

https://www.cyclingnews.com/news/for...elta-a-espana/

"Chaves ran into trouble on the climb of the Coll de la Gallina, but Australian teammate Damien Howson was on hand to give his teammate his bike to continue on the climb. However, the saddle height of 1.88-metre-tall [6'2"] Howson was far too high for the 1.64m [5'5"] climber, and Chaves was subsequently forced to change to Tsgabu Grmay's bike, which was slightly better, with the Ethiopean measuring only 1.75m"

Video he

https://www.facebook.com/globalcycli...3074978854737/

The Mavic neutral support cars only carry rim brake wheels since all
of the others are non-standard.


Ah...no..Mavic has been providing disc brake nutral support since at least 2017. This is an image from the 2019 Paris Roubaix, Zoom in and you'll see a pair of disc brake wheels on the back of the motor cycle.

https://rouleur.cc/editorial/wp-cont...9-1024x683.jpg

That picture is from this story on the 2019 Paris Roubaix:

https://rouleur.cc/editorial/not-all...utral-service/

"There is another game-changer for Mavic to consider: disc brakes. In the 2017 edition, Direct Energie, Sunweb, Delko Marseille, five Bahrain-Merida riders and a lone Cannondale-Drapac man (Will Clarke) were on them. “They know a wheel change takes longer, so they can’t really complain,”

Ledingham says of the process, which includes taking the through axle out, aligning the new wheel with the disc and getting the chain on properly. “It’s bound to add around 20 seconds for the rear.” However, disc brakes are here to stay: one Mavic mechanic reckons every team will be using them at Paris-Roubaix within five years."

All this stuff is pretty old news to anyone who actually follows cycling. When was the last time you actually watched a pro race? Based on what you wrote above, it wasn't an time in the recent past.
  #7  
Old October 18th 19, 04:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 1,045
Default Redline Conquest

On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 7:14:59 AM UTC-7, Zen Cycle wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 2:59:37 PM UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:

The Pros no longer use disk brake bikes if they believe that their
course will cause flats.


Gee skippy, still getting Andre to do your research, I see.....(hint: he's not very good at it)

Scroll through this photo gallery and you'll see more than half the peloton is using disc brakes:

http://www.steephill.tv/2019/paris-r...hotos/page-01/

so I guess the pros aren't worried about flats at Paris Roubaix?

And then have a same size teammate riding with them so that they
merely change bikes.


not always - Esteban Chaves in the 2019 Vuelta:

https://www.cyclingnews.com/news/for...elta-a-espana/

"Chaves ran into trouble on the climb of the Coll de la Gallina, but Australian teammate Damien Howson was on hand to give his teammate his bike to continue on the climb. However, the saddle height of 1.88-metre-tall [6'2"] Howson was far too high for the 1.64m [5'5"] climber, and Chaves was subsequently forced to change to Tsgabu Grmay's bike, which was slightly better, with the Ethiopean measuring only 1.75m"

Video he

https://www.facebook.com/globalcycli...3074978854737/

The Mavic neutral support cars only carry rim brake wheels since all
of the others are non-standard.


Ah...no..Mavic has been providing disc brake nutral support since at least 2017. This is an image from the 2019 Paris Roubaix, Zoom in and you'll see a pair of disc brake wheels on the back of the motor cycle.

https://rouleur.cc/editorial/wp-cont...9-1024x683.jpg

That picture is from this story on the 2019 Paris Roubaix:

https://rouleur.cc/editorial/not-all...utral-service/

"There is another game-changer for Mavic to consider: disc brakes. In the 2017 edition, Direct Energie, Sunweb, Delko Marseille, five Bahrain-Merida riders and a lone Cannondale-Drapac man (Will Clarke) were on them. “They know a wheel change takes longer, so they can’t really complain,”

Ledingham says of the process, which includes taking the through axle out, aligning the new wheel with the disc and getting the chain on properly. “It’s bound to add around 20 seconds for the rear.” However, disc brakes are here to stay: one Mavic mechanic reckons every team will be using them at Paris-Roubaix within five years."

All this stuff is pretty old news to anyone who actually follows cycling. When was the last time you actually watched a pro race? Based on what you wrote above, it wasn't an time in the recent past.


https://www.bikeradar.com/features/p...-france-bikes/
Mindless paperwork queens are always trying to convince people that they know what they're talking about even when they don't. Tell us Jr., why do you comment on things you know so little of?
  #8  
Old October 21st 19, 02:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Zen Cycle
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Posts: 191
Default Redline Conquest

On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 11:06:54 AM UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:

https://www.bikeradar.com/features/p...-france-bikes/


Did you even bother to read that link, sparky? apparently not. Even the pictures show half the pro tour teams are riding discs.

Mindless paperwork queens are always trying to convince people that they
know what they're talking about even when they don't. Tell us Jr.,
why do you comment on things you know so little of?


Your link shows pictures of the following teams bikes - with disc brakes:

Bora-Hansgrohe
Deceuninck Quick-Step
Dimension Data
Team Katusha-Alpecin
Mitchelton-Scott

Sunweb and Wanty-Group are riding some bikes with discs, some bikes with rims.

Again, skippy, The link you posted directly contradicts your claim. So, who is it that doesn't know what they're talking about?




  #9  
Old October 21st 19, 03:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 500
Default Redline Conquest

On Thursday, October 17, 2019 at 12:22:06 AM UTC+2, wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 3:12:32 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:59:37 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
Everyone always grinds lawyer's lips off as a first order of maintenance.


Really? On CF forks? Not me.

-- Jay Beattie.


As much as it pains me, I'll sort of agree with Tom on this. On all but one of my bikes I have ground off the tabs on the fork ends. The only fork I did not grind off is a carbon fork with an aero blade so the fork end is about 2 inches long. Can't grind that much metal off. All my carbon forks have aluminum dropouts, not carbon dropouts. So grinding is safe.


Even on carbon dropouts I grind off the laywer lips. On my CF bikes it is just a little carbon blob. Grinding, actually filling, off that little blob doesn't compromize the strength of your fork. It is as save as shorten your CF steerer tube or MTB handlebar. There is no load on that part.



Which brings up an irritation. With no fork tabs, you do not have to unscrew the dropout nut. Just flip the lever and the wheel falls out and goes back in perfectly. But sometimes when getting rides from friends, they will take the front wheel off my bike to put it on a rack. And when they take the front wheel off, the very first thing they do is start unscrewing the quick release nut. Which messes up my quick release width and I have to then readjust the dang thing when putting the wheel back on. Most bicyclists have been made stupid and dumb from this dumb fork tab feature. They no longer know how to correctly remove a front wheel on a bicycle.


+1 Laywer lips is an incredible stupid safety feature. Every time you take out your frontwheel creates a safety hazard.

Lou

  #10  
Old October 21st 19, 03:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 4,621
Default Redline Conquest

On Monday, 21 October 2019 10:41:09 UTC-4, wrote:
On Thursday, October 17, 2019 at 12:22:06 AM UTC+2, wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 3:12:32 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 11:59:37 AM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
Everyone always grinds lawyer's lips off as a first order of maintenance.

Really? On CF forks? Not me.

-- Jay Beattie.


As much as it pains me, I'll sort of agree with Tom on this. On all but one of my bikes I have ground off the tabs on the fork ends. The only fork I did not grind off is a carbon fork with an aero blade so the fork end is about 2 inches long. Can't grind that much metal off. All my carbon forks have aluminum dropouts, not carbon dropouts. So grinding is safe.


Even on carbon dropouts I grind off the laywer lips. On my CF bikes it is just a little carbon blob. Grinding, actually filling, off that little blob doesn't compromize the strength of your fork. It is as save as shorten your CF steerer tube or MTB handlebar. There is no load on that part.



Which brings up an irritation. With no fork tabs, you do not have to unscrew the dropout nut. Just flip the lever and the wheel falls out and goes back in perfectly. But sometimes when getting rides from friends, they will take the front wheel off my bike to put it on a rack. And when they take the front wheel off, the very first thing they do is start unscrewing the quick release nut. Which messes up my quick release width and I have to then readjust the dang thing when putting the wheel back on. Most bicyclists have been made stupid and dumb from this dumb fork tab feature. They no longer know how to correctly remove a front wheel on a bicycle.


+1 Laywer lips is an incredible stupid safety feature. Every time you take out your frontwheel creates a safety hazard.

Lou


Lawyer Lips almost defeat the purpose of having a quick release.

Cheers
 




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