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Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 24th 18, 08:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 2018-08-24 12:01, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 2:17:27 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 10:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't
test the bike racks for our local buses before signing the
contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and
neither did my friend's. Luckily the driver was patient and
helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so the hook goes
over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side
of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we
strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width
barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely squeezed in and I had
to push down hard. The rack looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b




When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

I wouldn't fault the rack designer too much. Bikes come in such
incredible variety it's tricky to design even stationary bike
racks. And transit companies are seldom flush with funds. They
can spend only so much to accommodate the one percent with
unusual bikes.


In this day and age 27-1/2" and 29" bikes hardly represent 1%. And
yes, the designers are at fault. They should have tested or at
least hold a design review with actual cyclists attending. In
med-tech we are obligated to hold those and for good reasons.

Also, as I wrote even a simple 26" MTB didn't fit completely, the
rear wheel remained an inch above the rail floor. In my book that
constitutes a thoroughly botched design.


As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular
ring might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong.
See, for example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht




Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps that
Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there remains
the risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that mounting
method and we'd be stranded.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Around here the bus drivers don't mind the few seconds it takes to
use a long Arno strap to secure the bike to the rack. I just loop the
strap around the top tube of the bike and then around the bus rack
and cinch the Arno strap tight. It takes just seconds and I usually
have it done whilst other passengers are getting on or off the bus.

Arno straps are really tough as are their buckles. I've never had an
Arno strap fail nor its buckle even when being used in the dead of
winter. I've had many a plastic buckle snap when being cinched in
winter's cold.


I'll have to cinch down the rim only because going over the frame won't
prevent the bike from sliding out sideways. Reason is that with a 29er
MTB one wheel rides on top of a slot rail end instead of down in the slot.

Probably the straps are some sort of Nylon material so I should be able
to cut one to 15" length and use a cigarette lighter to re-seal the cut
strands so they won't unravel.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #12  
Old August 25th 18, 03:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,349
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:25:58 AM UTC-5, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b

When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps. They are like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle that does not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them to secure a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use them for fastening everything to the bike when touring. In addition to that I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent etcetera instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's a link to an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260

You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are 3/4" wide.

Cheers


Never knew those had such an official formal name. Coghlans Arno Straps. I always just called them "straps with buckles on the end".
  #13  
Old August 25th 18, 03:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ned Mantei[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 24-08-18 16:35, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I have occasionally had a problem with my MTB in a Swiss train.
Depending on the train, there will typically be a space for bikes at the
end of the wagon. There you can hang the front wheel of your bike by a
hook, and the back wheel will be in a vertically mounted U-shaped,
fitting to keep it from swaying too much.
See https://www.radreise-wiki.de/Datei:S...lbstverlad.JPG
However, especially in older rail cars sometimes the hooks are too near
the ceiling and the wall, so that 2.25" tires won't fit. The train
operators (mainly the federal rail system) know about this problem, but
solving it involves more than just replacing the hooks.


Newer trains sometimes will have a wagon with a different sort of bike
parking:
https://blog.veloplus.ch/2015/03/24/...velotransport/
That works well, and it's easier to park your bike.

Ned

  #14  
Old August 25th 18, 03:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 2018-08-25 07:19, Ned Mantei wrote:
On 24-08-18 16:35, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test
the bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long
story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's.
Luckily the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes
reversed so the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my
panniers but worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the
other side of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we
strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely
fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down
hard. The rack looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I have occasionally had a problem with my MTB in a Swiss train.
Depending on the train, there will typically be a space for bikes at the
end of the wagon. There you can hang the front wheel of your bike by a
hook, and the back wheel will be in a vertically mounted U-shaped,
fitting to keep it from swaying too much.
See https://www.radreise-wiki.de/Datei:S...lbstverlad.JPG
However, especially in older rail cars sometimes the hooks are too near
the ceiling and the wall, so that 2.25" tires won't fit. The train
operators (mainly the federal rail system) know about this problem, but
solving it involves more than just replacing the hooks.


Why? I am sure that one of my riding buddies who is a machinist could
devise a solution and build a prototype in one afternoon.


Newer trains sometimes will have a wagon with a different sort of bike
parking:
https://blog.veloplus.ch/2015/03/24/...velotransport/

That works well, and it's easier to park your bike.


Seems they learned. I am trying now as well, have contacted someone
higher up at the transit agency and he already responded. He wants to
study our loading efforts on a camera recording to see the problem in
more detail. I didn't know they also had a running camera for that. If
he can't I'll ride my bike up there for a meeting at the bus depot. It's
a nice singletrack. Some of it gnarly, one of riding friends turfed it
on Thursday and now his shoulder hurts badly.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #15  
Old August 25th 18, 07:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 8/24/2018 2:17 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:

As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps that
Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there remains the
risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that mounting method and
we'd be stranded.


I do have some with steel loops, but that's OK. I should have known it
wouldn't work for you. ;-)

A certain guy I know well once had a habit of asking my advice. "Can you
come over and look at this? You're an engineer." So I'd visit and hear
"The garage door track is coming loose" or "This table I'm building has
wobbly legs" or "I need a way to carry this bag on the back of my bike"
or a bunch of other things.

In each case, the answer seemed obvious to me - as in "You need
something to resist that bending moment, so if you add a brace here" or
"... if you screw this in two places..." or whatever.

Invariably, he'd say "That won't work, because..." and spout some nonsense.

I still see the guy from time to time. When he asks me about problems
now, I usually say things like "Yeah, I see why that bothers you. What
do you think?" and later "Well, you could try that if you like."

--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #16  
Old August 25th 18, 07:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 8/24/2018 2:09 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 09:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 11:25:58 AM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot
wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't
test the bike racks for our local buses before signing the
contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither
did my friend's. Luckily the driver was patient and helpful. We
had to load the bikes reversed so the hook goes over the rear
wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but worked, somehow. The
front wheels now rode up on the other side of the rack slot. We
both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as hard as
we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack
looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b




When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps. They are
like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle that does
not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them to secure
a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use them for
fastening everything to the bike when touring. In addition to that
I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent etcetera
instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's a link to
an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260




Aha, Arno straps! Thanks, those look very good. They can also come in
handy when something structural breaks on the bike during a trail ride.




You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are 3/4" wide.

Cheers


Addendum

I forgot to mention that I use those Arno Straps to secure my
mountain bicyle to the front rack on our inter-city bus. It's great
insurance for when the bus is running at highway speeds.


On the freeway the bus driver really stepped on it and actually passed a
tour bus. I was concerned that the handlebar of my bike might smash a
front window on the bus but despite being just 2" from it that didn't
happen. He took corners Mario Andretti style and luckily neither bike
flew out sideways. The bungees were all that was holding them sideways
to the bus depending on curve direction (away from the hook).

If I was an engineer on the design review for such a rack (they don't
seem to hold any design reviews ...) I'd insist that there are wheel
hooks for front and rear wheel. And, of course, slots long enough for
29ers and 27-1/2 bikes. In fact, then you could leave the slots open to
the curb side making loading and unloading much easier for older riders
who can't lift a bike upwards while bent over (something even young
people should avoid).


Don't forget to design for small wheel, short wheelbase shopping bikes.
And for long wheelbase "flatfoot" bikes. For short wheelbase and long
wheelbase recumbents. For recumbents with 20" wheels and 700c wheels.
For under-seat steering and above-seat steering. For tandems, including
conventional, small wheel, and recumbent. For tall bikes and for
antiques, including high wheelers. (Most of those are very valuable.)
For carbon fiber frames as well as metal. For folding bikes, especially
if carrying packs, because those frequently can't go into the bus. For
electric assist bikes, and electric powered bikes.

Don't worry about unicycles. This is a BIcycle discussion group.

--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #17  
Old August 25th 18, 07:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,724
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 8/25/2018 1:22 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 2:09 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 09:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 11:25:58 AM UTC-4, Sir
Ridesalot
wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg
wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously
didn't
test the bike racks for our local buses before signing the
contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't fit in
and neither
did my friend's. Luckily the driver was patient and
helpful. We
had to load the bikes reversed so the hook goes over
the rear
wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but worked,
somehow. The
front wheels now rode up on the other side of the rack
slot. We
both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down
as hard as
we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25"
wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard.
The rack
looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b




When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on
even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is
faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps.
They are
like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle
that does
not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them
to secure
a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use
them for
fastening everything to the bike when touring. In
addition to that
I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent
etcetera
instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's
a link to
an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260




Aha, Arno straps! Thanks, those look very good. They can
also come in handy when something structural breaks on the
bike during a trail ride.




You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are
3/4" wide.

Cheers

Addendum

I forgot to mention that I use those Arno Straps to
secure my
mountain bicyle to the front rack on our inter-city bus.
It's great
insurance for when the bus is running at highway speeds.


On the freeway the bus driver really stepped on it and
actually passed a tour bus. I was concerned that the
handlebar of my bike might smash a front window on the bus
but despite being just 2" from it that didn't happen. He
took corners Mario Andretti style and luckily neither bike
flew out sideways. The bungees were all that was holding
them sideways to the bus depending on curve direction
(away from the hook).

If I was an engineer on the design review for such a rack
(they don't seem to hold any design reviews ...) I'd
insist that there are wheel hooks for front and rear
wheel. And, of course, slots long enough for 29ers and
27-1/2 bikes. In fact, then you could leave the slots open
to the curb side making loading and unloading much easier
for older riders who can't lift a bike upwards while bent
over (something even young people should avoid).


Don't forget to design for small wheel, short wheelbase
shopping bikes. And for long wheelbase "flatfoot" bikes. For
short wheelbase and long wheelbase recumbents. For
recumbents with 20" wheels and 700c wheels. For under-seat
steering and above-seat steering. For tandems, including
conventional, small wheel, and recumbent. For tall bikes and
for antiques, including high wheelers. (Most of those are
very valuable.) For carbon fiber frames as well as metal.
For folding bikes, especially if carrying packs, because
those frequently can't go into the bus. For electric assist
bikes, and electric powered bikes.

Don't worry about unicycles. This is a BIcycle discussion
group.


More true than you know, Frank.

Sold a wheel tray type hitch-mount car carrier last week to
a guy who came back because the retaining strap for the
downtube would not span the 6"x10" downtube on his XMart
internal battery wonder toy. O Tempora! O Mores!

As it turns out, the Saris polymer strap-buckle thingy can
be doubled up nose-to-toe and we stock them anyway.

https://66e2197c1fdd000748fd-b9614b5.../15539_700.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #18  
Old August 25th 18, 07:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 2018-08-25 11:39, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/25/2018 1:22 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 2:09 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 09:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 11:25:58 AM UTC-4, Sir
Ridesalot
wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg
wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously
didn't
test the bike racks for our local buses before signing the
contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't fit in
and neither
did my friend's. Luckily the driver was patient and
helpful. We
had to load the bikes reversed so the hook goes over
the rear
wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but worked,
somehow. The
front wheels now rode up on the other side of the rack
slot. We
both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down
as hard as
we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25"
wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard.
The rack
looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b





When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on
even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is
faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps.
They are
like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle
that does
not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them
to secure
a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use
them for
fastening everything to the bike when touring. In
addition to that
I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent
etcetera
instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's
a link to
an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260





Aha, Arno straps! Thanks, those look very good. They can
also come in handy when something structural breaks on the
bike during a trail ride.




You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are
3/4" wide.

Cheers

Addendum

I forgot to mention that I use those Arno Straps to
secure my
mountain bicyle to the front rack on our inter-city bus.
It's great
insurance for when the bus is running at highway speeds.


On the freeway the bus driver really stepped on it and
actually passed a tour bus. I was concerned that the
handlebar of my bike might smash a front window on the bus
but despite being just 2" from it that didn't happen. He
took corners Mario Andretti style and luckily neither bike
flew out sideways. The bungees were all that was holding
them sideways to the bus depending on curve direction
(away from the hook).

If I was an engineer on the design review for such a rack
(they don't seem to hold any design reviews ...) I'd
insist that there are wheel hooks for front and rear
wheel. And, of course, slots long enough for 29ers and
27-1/2 bikes. In fact, then you could leave the slots open
to the curb side making loading and unloading much easier
for older riders who can't lift a bike upwards while bent
over (something even young people should avoid).


Don't forget to design for small wheel, short wheelbase
shopping bikes. And for long wheelbase "flatfoot" bikes. For
short wheelbase and long wheelbase recumbents. For
recumbents with 20" wheels and 700c wheels. For under-seat
steering and above-seat steering. For tandems, including
conventional, small wheel, and recumbent. For tall bikes and
for antiques, including high wheelers. (Most of those are
very valuable.) For carbon fiber frames as well as metal.
For folding bikes, especially if carrying packs, because
those frequently can't go into the bus. For electric assist
bikes, and electric powered bikes.

Don't worry about unicycles. This is a BIcycle discussion
group.


But don't forget the rolling zeppelins.


More true than you know, Frank.

Sold a wheel tray type hitch-mount car carrier last week to a guy who
came back because the retaining strap for the downtube would not span
the 6"x10" downtube on his XMart internal battery wonder toy. O Tempora!
O Mores!

As it turns out, the Saris polymer strap-buckle thingy can be doubled up
nose-to-toe and we stock them anyway.

https://66e2197c1fdd000748fd-b9614b5.../15539_700.jpg


Most bus passengers won't show up with E-bikes because the driver is not
allowed to assist with loading and those things are heavy. Straps aren't
a problem because they clamp a wheel. However, slot length will
increasingly problematic on not so well designed racks like they are
used on our buses.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old August 25th 18, 07:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On 2018-08-25 11:12, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 2:17 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:

As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht



Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps
that Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there
remains the risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that
mounting method and we'd be stranded.


I do have some with steel loops, but that's OK. I should have known it
wouldn't work for you. ;-)

A certain guy I know well once had a habit of asking my advice. "Can you
come over and look at this? You're an engineer." So I'd visit and hear
"The garage door track is coming loose" or "This table I'm building has
wobbly legs" or "I need a way to carry this bag on the back of my bike"
or a bunch of other things.

In each case, the answer seemed obvious to me - as in "You need
something to resist that bending moment, so if you add a brace here" or
"... if you screw this in two places..." or whatever.

Invariably, he'd say "That won't work, because..." and spout some nonsense.

I still see the guy from time to time. When he asks me about problems
now, I usually say things like "Yeah, I see why that bothers you. What
do you think?" and later "Well, you could try that if you like."


I would have assumed that you as a mechanical engineer would understand
that plastic buckles will not be adequate for holding a bike wheel _on_
the slot (not _in_ the slot) at freeway speeds and when taking corners
at a good clip.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #20  
Old August 25th 18, 08:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,727
Default Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?

On Saturday, August 25, 2018 at 2:58:12 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-25 11:12, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 2:17 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:

As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps
that Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there
remains the risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that
mounting method and we'd be stranded.


I do have some with steel loops, but that's OK. I should have known it
wouldn't work for you. ;-)

A certain guy I know well once had a habit of asking my advice. "Can you
come over and look at this? You're an engineer." So I'd visit and hear
"The garage door track is coming loose" or "This table I'm building has
wobbly legs" or "I need a way to carry this bag on the back of my bike"
or a bunch of other things.

In each case, the answer seemed obvious to me - as in "You need
something to resist that bending moment, so if you add a brace here" or
"... if you screw this in two places..." or whatever.

Invariably, he'd say "That won't work, because..." and spout some nonsense.

I still see the guy from time to time. When he asks me about problems
now, I usually say things like "Yeah, I see why that bothers you. What
do you think?" and later "Well, you could try that if you like."


I would have assumed that you as a mechanical engineer would understand
that plastic buckles will not be adequate for holding a bike wheel _on_
the slot (not _in_ the slot) at freeway speeds and when taking corners
at a good clip.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


When I know the bus is going onto a highway, I use two Arno straps on the bus carrier to brace the bike so that it doesn't end up leaning to one side or the other and thus put a lot of sideways pressure on the wheels. Again, I wrap the Arno straps around the FRAME not the wheels so that the sideways stress is take by the frame and straps not the wheels.

Cheers
 




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