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What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 24th 06, 12:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?

I am curious as to know what a "better" Shimano STI shifter would do for me
over the cheaper ones.
As I see it at present, we have the Shimano Tiagra, 105's, Ultegra, and
DuraAce STI shifters.
For example, What would make the DuraAce shifter better than a Tiagra
shifter.
The price difference is pretty big, so what would a DuraAce shifter offer to
make it so much better than a cheaper Tiagra shifter?
Does it use special precision ball bearings versus bushings or something?
Maybe the indexing mechanisim is higher quality or something.
Can you get repair parts for the "good" STI shifters versus the cheaper
ones, are they rebuildable or something?
I am trying to find out what justifies the huge price difference.
Now granted other components can make a big difference, I did notice that a
really nice rear Shimano cassette and a expensive Wipperman chain versus
stock OEM stuff can make a bike shift so much nicer. But I was trying to
determine what going to a "good" STI shifter might bring to the picture.
Obviously if you hop onto a bike at the LBS with all DuraAce components on
it, it is going to shift really well, but it has a good chain, rear cassette
and stuff already, so my\aybe that will mask out what a "good" shifter might
be doing or not doing.
Thanks for reading.



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  #2  
Old June 24th 06, 01:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?

Earl Bollinger wrote:
I am curious as to know what a "better" Shimano STI shifter would do for me
over the cheaper ones.
As I see it at present, we have the Shimano Tiagra, 105's, Ultegra, and
DuraAce STI shifters.
For example, What would make the DuraAce shifter better than a Tiagra
shifter.
The price difference is pretty big, so what would a DuraAce shifter offer to
make it so much better than a cheaper Tiagra shifter?
Does it use special precision ball bearings versus bushings or something?
Maybe the indexing mechanisim is higher quality or something.
Can you get repair parts for the "good" STI shifters versus the cheaper
ones, are they rebuildable or something?
I am trying to find out what justifies the huge price difference.
Now granted other components can make a big difference, I did notice that a
really nice rear Shimano cassette and a expensive Wipperman chain versus
stock OEM stuff can make a bike shift so much nicer. But I was trying to
determine what going to a "good" STI shifter might bring to the picture.
Obviously if you hop onto a bike at the LBS with all DuraAce components on
it, it is going to shift really well, but it has a good chain, rear cassette
and stuff already, so my\aybe that will mask out what a "good" shifter might
be doing or not doing.
Thanks for reading.


Great question! The 9-speed 105 STI levers I have work very well indeed
with my Ultegra rear derailleur and Dura-Ace cassette. I use an HG-53
chain (is that about 105 level?).

Maybe weight and snob appeal are the main differences?

Weights according to shimano's web site:
D-A ST-7800 419g
Ultegra ST-6600 490g
105 ST-5600 weight not given
Tiagra ST-4400 (9-speed) 490g

  #3  
Old June 24th 06, 03:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?


Earl Bollinger wrote:
I am curious as to know what a "better" Shimano STI shifter would do for me
over the cheaper ones.
As I see it at present, we have the Shimano Tiagra, 105's, Ultegra, and
DuraAce STI shifters.
For example, What would make the DuraAce shifter better than a Tiagra
shifter.


Define 'better'. All move the rder the same amount with the same amount
of lever force and precision. Is better more reliable or crisper or
what?


The price difference is pretty big, so what would a DuraAce shifter offer to
make it so much better than a cheaper Tiagra shifter?


Like all things 'bike' these days, less weight. Very little in bike
stuff has 'better' have anything to do with function.

Does it use special precision ball bearings versus bushings or something?
Maybe the indexing mechanisim is higher quality or something.
Can you get repair parts for the "good" STI shifters versus the cheaper
ones, are they rebuildable or something?



Nope, nope and nope....


I am trying to find out what justifies the huge price difference.
Now granted other components can make a big difference, I did notice that a
really nice rear Shimano cassette and a expensive Wipperman chain versus
stock OEM stuff can make a bike shift so much nicer. But I was trying to
determine what going to a "good" STI shifter might bring to the picture.
Obviously if you hop onto a bike at the LBS with all DuraAce components on
it, it is going to shift really well, but it has a good chain, rear cassette
and stuff already, so my\aybe that will mask out what a "good" shifter might
be doing or not doing.


My suggestion, spend your money to make the frame better, make it fit
better, then make sure the fork is 'better', then the wheels, to make
them reliable, the brakes cuz ya gotta stop, then a saddle that suits
yer bum.....generally components, that do the shifting, are far down
the list of what makes one bike 'better' than another. All shifters do
the same thing and if adjusted, using good inner wire and housing,
shift the ders....I wouldn't get to sweated up about components...get
concerned about the frame and bike fit and your fitness and overall
reliability....so you can ride.
Thanks for reading.


  #4  
Old June 24th 06, 03:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?


Earl Bollinger wrote:
I am curious as to know what a "better" Shimano STI shifter would do for me
over the cheaper ones.
As I see it at present, we have the Shimano Tiagra, 105's, Ultegra, and
DuraAce STI shifters.
For example, What would make the DuraAce shifter better than a Tiagra
shifter.


Define 'better'. All move the rder the same amount with the same amount
of lever force and precision. Is better more reliable or crisper or
what?


The price difference is pretty big, so what would a DuraAce shifter offer to
make it so much better than a cheaper Tiagra shifter?


Like all things 'bike' these days, less weight. Very little in bike
stuff has 'better' have anything to do with function.

Does it use special precision ball bearings versus bushings or something?
Maybe the indexing mechanisim is higher quality or something.
Can you get repair parts for the "good" STI shifters versus the cheaper
ones, are they rebuildable or something?



Nope, nope and nope....


I am trying to find out what justifies the huge price difference.
Now granted other components can make a big difference, I did notice that a
really nice rear Shimano cassette and a expensive Wipperman chain versus
stock OEM stuff can make a bike shift so much nicer. But I was trying to
determine what going to a "good" STI shifter might bring to the picture.
Obviously if you hop onto a bike at the LBS with all DuraAce components on
it, it is going to shift really well, but it has a good chain, rear cassette
and stuff already, so my\aybe that will mask out what a "good" shifter might
be doing or not doing.


It's not 'DuraAce', but new stuff, hopefully adjusted well. I think the
mistake many buyers make is look at two bikes, identical except for
ultegra and DA, and choose the DA...'should' save some $ and pick the
ultegra or even the 105 equipped bike, and save some $...But ya lose
some coffee shop points, of course, with lower end 'bits'.

My suggestion, spend your money to make the frame better, make it fit
better, then make sure the fork is 'better', then the wheels, to make
them reliable, the brakes cuz ya gotta stop, then a saddle that suits
yer bum.....generally components, that do the shifting, are far down
the list of what makes one bike 'better' than another. All shifters do
the same thing and if adjusted, using good inner wire and housing,
shift the ders....I wouldn't get to sweated up about components...get
concerned about the frame and bike fit and your fitness and overall
reliability....so you can ride.
Thanks for reading.


  #6  
Old June 24th 06, 04:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: n/a
Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?

Jeff Starr wrote:

Maybe weight and snob appeal are the main differences?

Of course, that would be it. My desire to be a snob drove me to buy
the Dura-ace components. Never mind that most people don't know, care,
or can tell the difference.

The D-A STI's don't rattle. An important feature ifd you live in a country
with roads made of bricks and/or cobble stones.

Gr, Derk
  #7  
Old June 26th 06, 11:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?

On 24 Jun 2006 07:10:44 -0700, "Qui si parla Campagnolo"
wrote:

. All move the rder the same amount with the same amount
of lever force


I've used Ultegra and Dura-Ace 9-speed levers and they felt differnt
-- different amounts of force required to move them. The Ultegra took
less force -- felt softer.

JT

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  #8  
Old June 27th 06, 02:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default What makes a Shimano STI shifter better than another STI shifter?

"Earl Bollinger" wrote in message
. ..
I am curious as to know what a "better" Shimano STI shifter would do for me
over the cheaper ones.
As I see it at present, we have the Shimano Tiagra, 105's, Ultegra, and
DuraAce STI shifters.
For example, What would make the DuraAce shifter better than a Tiagra
shifter.
The price difference is pretty big, so what would a DuraAce shifter offer
to make it so much better than a cheaper Tiagra shifter?
Does it use special precision ball bearings versus bushings or something?
Maybe the indexing mechanisim is higher quality or something.
Can you get repair parts for the "good" STI shifters versus the cheaper
ones, are they rebuildable or something?
I am trying to find out what justifies the huge price difference.
Now granted other components can make a big difference, I did notice that
a really nice rear Shimano cassette and a expensive Wipperman chain versus
stock OEM stuff can make a bike shift so much nicer. But I was trying to
determine what going to a "good" STI shifter might bring to the picture.
Obviously if you hop onto a bike at the LBS with all DuraAce components on
it, it is going to shift really well, but it has a good chain, rear
cassette and stuff already, so my\aybe that will mask out what a "good"
shifter might be doing or not doing.
Thanks for reading.



Thanks all,
I sort of suspected it was what you all stated. But I wasn't sure.
Earl


 




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