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cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm



 
 
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  #61  
Old March 8th 17, 02:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,669
Default old-school tools [photo]

On 3/7/2017 6:24 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

Let's see your Italian tools too
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/NITRIDE.JPG


... !?

(speechless)

Only comfort is, while you can fire your arrows
from the Tower of Babel, you can NEVER strike God!




They are only pretty on the day they arrive back from the
sharpeners.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #62  
Old March 8th 17, 05:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,116
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 4:20:07 PM UTC-8, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 16:34:29 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

AMuzi wrote:

Look inside the 11t sprocket and you will see
the splines do not go fully through to the
outside. Add a 1mm spacer behind the low
gear, lube and torque your lockring and that
rattle will go away.


OK, now I get it (I think), by rattle, you mean
what I've called crash sounds. You suggest
I should remove the new cassette, put in the
spacer, and put the cassette back on? Even tho
I don't experience anything negative using it
as it is? And this time, no crash sounds or
"rattle" when pulling?


I think there is a bit of a translation problems with crash and rattle
:-) To most Americans (who is whom you are usually talking on this
site) a "crash" is the sound of you hitting a school buss at 30kph
while "rattle" is the sound of a spray paint can when you shake it to
get the paint well mixed :-)


Sounds like it's been a long time since you lived in America.

  #63  
Old March 8th 17, 08:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default old-school tools [photo]

On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 17:33:07 -0600, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/7/2017 5:18 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:

I have tools that are by now exotic - and
hopefully I'll paste a picture of some of
them tonight...

Yes, that would be nice.


Keep it real:

http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/work-...cool-tools.jpg


I hate to be picky but your photo doesn't include the most important
tool in any mechanic's tool box. The BFH :-)





Let's see your Italian tools too
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/NITRIDE.JPG

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #64  
Old March 8th 17, 08:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On Wed, 08 Mar 2017 01:27:42 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

John B. wrote:

I think there is a bit of a translation
problems with crash and rattle :-) To most
Americans (who is whom you are usually
talking on this site) a "crash" is the sound
of you hitting a school buss at 30kph while
"rattle" is the sound of a spray paint can
when you shake it to get the paint well mixed
:-)


But it IS the buss sound, only not so loud!


Actually the bus doesn't even grunt. It is the bicycle that makes the
big noise :-)

Aaanyway, thanks everyone for this session,
etc. etc., I'll be back in a while, I hope.


and you'll be welcomed.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #65  
Old March 10th 17, 07:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,150
Default old-school tools [photo]

On 2017-03-07 15:18, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:

I have tools that are by now exotic - and
hopefully I'll paste a picture of some of
them tonight...


Yes, that would be nice.


Keep it real:

http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/work-...cool-tools.jpg


Nice. Here is my grandpa's electric drill, a pre-WWII model:

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/sed/olddrill.JPG

Has a new cord though because the original one didn't appear safe to me.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #66  
Old March 10th 17, 08:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,150
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On 2017-03-07 16:27, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 08:21:06 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-06 17:00, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:


[...]



... isn't this like a poor-man's torque wrench and much more complicated
at that?


No, it is very practical. I try to be a minimalist with many things. Why
buy and store a torque wrench when it is not truly needed? Then there is
the ratchet mechanism. When it gets old how do you know it is still
accurate? The suitcase scale I can easily check.

I might comment that at one time I worked in the Edwards AFB (USAF
Test Center) shops where we had a "Torque Wrench Shop" where the guy
tested and recalibrating torque wrenches. I once asked him how many of
the torque wrenches turned in for calibration actually needed
adjustment. He said "all of them, even the new ones".


Exactly what I meant. I never really trusted those things which is why I
never bought one.


The calibration bench was simply a shaft with an arm to which weights
were added :-)


Bingo! Got to keep life simple.

Some folks seem to need a special tool for just about everything. Others
try to get by with a minimum and it all works fine.

A classic example was when the big stereo died at a party in the 80's.
So I opened it and found that a wire at the power switch had come off.
"Do you guys have a soldering iron?" ... "A what? No, we are all
mechanical engineer students. We've got mechanical tools, a welder, and
beer, lots of beer" ... "Ok then, do you have a 5mm or 6mm Allen wrench
and a pair of pliers?" ... "YES! Of course! What a question" ... "Well,
with that and the range in your kitchen we now can solder" ... "Huh?"

Five minutes later the stereo worked again an I was the hero for 15
minutes or so. Being inebriated by that time I forgot (!) to unplug the
stereo before the repair and this was in 230V country. Whew.

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #67  
Old March 11th 17, 12:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:08:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-07 16:27, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 08:21:06 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-06 17:00, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:


[...]



... isn't this like a poor-man's torque wrench and much more complicated
at that?


No, it is very practical. I try to be a minimalist with many things. Why
buy and store a torque wrench when it is not truly needed? Then there is
the ratchet mechanism. When it gets old how do you know it is still
accurate? The suitcase scale I can easily check.

I might comment that at one time I worked in the Edwards AFB (USAF
Test Center) shops where we had a "Torque Wrench Shop" where the guy
tested and recalibrating torque wrenches. I once asked him how many of
the torque wrenches turned in for calibration actually needed
adjustment. He said "all of them, even the new ones".


Exactly what I meant. I never really trusted those things which is why I
never bought one.

On the other hand installing and correctly tightening 56 spark plugs
in one engine is difficult to do without some sort of instrumented
device :-)

The calibration bench was simply a shaft with an arm to which weights
were added :-)


Bingo! Got to keep life simple.

It is called a "dead weight tester" and is commonly used where exact
measurements are required :-)

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #68  
Old March 11th 17, 10:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,652
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On Friday, March 10, 2017 at 4:44:46 PM UTC-8, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:08:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-07 16:27, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 08:21:06 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-06 17:00, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:


[...]



... isn't this like a poor-man's torque wrench and much more complicated
at that?


No, it is very practical. I try to be a minimalist with many things. Why
buy and store a torque wrench when it is not truly needed? Then there is
the ratchet mechanism. When it gets old how do you know it is still
accurate? The suitcase scale I can easily check.

I might comment that at one time I worked in the Edwards AFB (USAF
Test Center) shops where we had a "Torque Wrench Shop" where the guy
tested and recalibrating torque wrenches. I once asked him how many of
the torque wrenches turned in for calibration actually needed
adjustment. He said "all of them, even the new ones".


Exactly what I meant. I never really trusted those things which is why I
never bought one.

On the other hand installing and correctly tightening 56 spark plugs
in one engine is difficult to do without some sort of instrumented
device :-)

The calibration bench was simply a shaft with an arm to which weights
were added :-)


Bingo! Got to keep life simple.

It is called a "dead weight tester" and is commonly used where exact
measurements are required :-)


John, I don't remember anyone using torque wrenches to install the spark plugs into a Wright Cyclone 14 cylinder twin row radial engine. And I know WHY they used four plugs per cylinder. You would develop a "calibrated" arm. The copper gaskets gave you a lot of room for torque error.
  #69  
Old March 13th 17, 06:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,116
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm


I use a regular wrench, note the length, calculate the required pull
force at the end and then I use a suitcase scales that my sister gave
me. A digital one with a hook where you normally lift a suitcase with
to see if it is still under the required 50lbs. Under $10.


To get to 150lbf-ft for the front wheel bearings on a BMC Mini (not the
BMW MINI) I'd put a stout tube on the end of the breaker bar then
calculate where to stand on it. To undo ditto but stand further out &
jump on the tube.


Yep. I did the same thing with VW Bus rear axle nuts.


You guys are such geeks. What I did on mine was to corner harder and harder until I broke the rear axle lugs off, one at a time. I'd hear it snap followed by the nut and broken-off part hitting the inside of the hubcap, then rattle around as I pulled up to a stop. And it wasn't a volkswagon.

  #70  
Old March 13th 17, 10:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,116
Default cassette clockwise arrow 40 nm

On Friday, March 10, 2017 at 4:44:46 PM UTC-8, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:08:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-07 16:27, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 07 Mar 2017 08:21:06 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-03-06 17:00, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Joerg wrote:


[...]



... isn't this like a poor-man's torque wrench and much more complicated
at that?


No, it is very practical. I try to be a minimalist with many things. Why
buy and store a torque wrench when it is not truly needed? Then there is
the ratchet mechanism. When it gets old how do you know it is still
accurate? The suitcase scale I can easily check.

I might comment that at one time I worked in the Edwards AFB (USAF
Test Center) shops where we had a "Torque Wrench Shop" where the guy
tested and recalibrating torque wrenches. I once asked him how many of
the torque wrenches turned in for calibration actually needed
adjustment. He said "all of them, even the new ones".


Exactly what I meant. I never really trusted those things which is why I
never bought one.

On the other hand installing and correctly tightening 56 spark plugs
in one engine is difficult to do without some sort of instrumented
device :-)

Actually what you could have done is to note how much rotation - beyond first bottoming contact - brings the plug to the desired torque - for example 1/4 turn after the crush washer is engaged, and then do that every time.

 




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