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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 15th 14, 01:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: Hydration


Take the first sip of water as you are rolling out the driveway. It
sets the proper rhythm, and lets you know you forgot to clean your
bottle while you can still go back and do something about it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

A man riding his first September Century complained to another rider
that the water he'd been drinking was sloshing in his stomach. The
more-experienced rider said "You're supposed to take it in small sips,
not big gulps." The first man thought that he'd been advised to
replace each big gulp with one small sip, and would have been in dire
straits if the place where he ran out of steam and had to get off the
bike had not been serving his favorite beverage. He sat for a hour
sipping slowly, then got back on the bike and finished the ride --
taking small sips *frequently*.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
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  #12  
Old September 22nd 14, 03:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: Carrying a cable


If you lock your lock to your frame or a wire pannier, it won't fall
out and get lost -- and it guarantees that you won't look the bike to
something when you haven't got the key.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #13  
Old September 22nd 14, 12:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John D. Slocomb
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Posts: 28
Default AG: Carrying a cable

On Sun, 21 Sep 2014 23:39:32 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


If you lock your lock to your frame or a wire pannier, it won't fall
out and get lost -- and it guarantees that you won't look the bike to
something when you haven't got the key.


A combination lock solves a lot of "can't find the key" problems :-)
--
cheers,

John D.Slocomb
  #14  
Old September 22nd 14, 01:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Andrew Chaplin
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Posts: 194
Default AG: Carrying a cable

Joy Beeson wrote in
:

If you lock your lock to your frame or a wire pannier, it won't fall
out and get lost -- and it guarantees that you won't look the bike to
something when you haven't got the key.


I cannot abide rattling from my bicycle, so I put my U-lock in my pack. I
also carry a cable to secure the front wheel.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
  #15  
Old September 29th 14, 03:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: Narrow Bike Lanes


When you are riding in a narrow bike lane and hear a car behind you,
watch until you see it in your rear-view mirror, then reflect that you
are smaller than a car and wait a bit longer. When you are quite sure
that the driver can see you clearly, wobble over the bike-lane line
into his lane, then immediately wobble back to the middle of the bike
lane. When you can see that the driver has selected his route and
decided on how much clearance to give you, move as far toward the edge
of the road as you dare -- that six inches might matter.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #16  
Old October 5th 14, 04:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: The seasons, they are a-changing.


When you can't match the weather perfectly, overdress below the waist
and under-dress above. It's easier to change your shirt than your
pants, and it's very important to keep your knees warm.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #17  
Old October 12th 14, 04:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: It's vasomotor rhinitis season


Paper handkerchiefs go all to lint in your pocket. Carry table
napkins or paper towels.

If you dry your hands on a paper towel, trash the snotty paper in your
pocket and keep the merely-wet paper.

Vasomotor rhinitis would be a great way to drain out a stuffy head --
if I had a nurse following me around in a motor home so that I could
lie down the instant I'd had enough exercise.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #18  
Old October 15th 14, 01:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Andrew Chaplin
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Posts: 194
Default AG: It's vasomotor rhinitis season

Joy Beeson wrote in
:

Paper handkerchiefs go all to lint in your pocket. Carry table
napkins or paper towels.


Cotton handkerchiefs work, too.

If you dry your hands on a paper towel, trash the snotty paper in your
pocket and keep the merely-wet paper.

Vasomotor rhinitis would be a great way to drain out a stuffy head --
if I had a nurse following me around in a motor home so that I could
lie down the instant I'd had enough exercise.


I reduce its severity by wearing eye protection that restricts air flow
around the eyes, and something--generally just my helmet, but, in colder
weather, a wool cap or balaclava--to cover the sinuses.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
  #19  
Old October 19th 14, 06:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: Look out for the leaves


Autumn's leaves can be as slippery as winter's ice. Even when the
pavement is dry, leaf-on-leaf doesn't have a very high coefficient of
friction, and when there's a layer of slimy rotten leaves hiding under
the dry fluffy leaves, you haven't got a chance.


As dramatic as it would be to say that the incident on the boardwalk
last November was the reason that the rides long enough to record in
my diary at
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/~joybeeson/CENT2014/
didn't start until August[1], there were other factors: the weather
turned nasty just as rehab had begun, the winter's supply of snow was
doled out to keep the roads slick almost every day, and in March I
slipped on snow I'd tracked into the kitchen, twisted my knee, and had
to ride a flatfoot instead of walking well into spring.

I heartily recommend the flatfoot/comfort/step-through/semi-recumbent
bike for rehab, by the way -- it allows you to exercise a leg without
putting weight on it, and you can't strain muscles because it won't
allow you to push the pedals with anything resembling force. Though I
did once instinctively pull back on the handlebars until I almost rose
in the saddle when I wanted to charge the transition from sod road to
asphalt, and it worked.

But you do have to be able to walk at least a little before you can
ride, and if there is an upslope along your route you have to be able
to walk at least that far -- but a flatfoot is an excellent wheeled
cane.


[1] The reports start in September because the routes of the warm-up
rides in August were boring. Also, September was when I got the idea
of writing up my quarter centuries.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #20  
Old October 26th 14, 03:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 888
Default AG: Let them pass


When someone is stuck behind you and can't get around, keep your eyes
peeled for a place to pull off and let him pass.

Never mind that it's the only polite thing to do. Never mind that
most state laws say that slow-moving vehicles must not hold up traffic
any more than they have to. You want those guys out in front where
you can keep an eye on them!


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
 




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