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Shoe Overlap



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 10th 17, 05:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Shoe Overlap

A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and although it fits great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel. The danger of this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out with your foot then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do this because they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then start again with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high siding because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by a hundred riders.
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  #2  
Old March 10th 17, 05:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default Shoe Overlap

On 3/10/2017 12:14 PM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and although it fits great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel. The danger of this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out with your foot then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do this because they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then start again with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high siding because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by a hundred riders.


I have overlap with (IIRC) two of my bikes, exacerbated by front
fenders. I've never had a problem with it. It doesn't matter once a
person's riding, because except at super low track-standish speeds, the
steering angle is not great enough to cause interference.

But I have two friends who toppled as they started from a dead stop,
both with the same cause. As they stood still, they had their front
wheel turned so the rear portion of the wheel was outside their foot, so
to speak. As they started up and tried to balance, their toe prevented
the front wheel from returning to center. No injuries; just embarrassment.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old March 10th 17, 08:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 8,469
Default Shoe Overlap

On 3/10/2017 2:23 PM, Duane wrote:
On 10/03/2017 1:50 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/10/2017 11:14 AM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and
although it fits
great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel.
The danger of
this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out
with your foot
then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do
this because
they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then
start again
with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high
siding
because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by
a hundred
riders.


A known issue but I am very much surprised that his
builder didn't
discuss that with the client before starting any
metalwork. Usually, the
drawing is reviewed in depth, and revised through several
iterations,
before the build.


That's not unusual with a compact frame is it? My Tarmac is
like that. I found out doing a track stand in traffic and
got my toe stuck between the wheel and frame. ouch.

Though I've never had issues when actually moving as my
wheel doesn't turn that much then.


Right, and Frank touched on that as well.

My concern is that for a custom designed frame, the builder
ought to have discussed this at some point with the rider
before the build. It's not 'wrong', but some riders really
hate it and will accept a longer top tube rather than
overlap if given the choice.

At any rate a custom frame shouldn't have surprises.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #6  
Old March 10th 17, 08:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 3,674
Default Shoe Overlap

On 2017-03-10 10:50, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/10/2017 11:14 AM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and although it fits
great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel. The danger of
this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out with your foot
then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do this because
they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then start again
with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high siding
because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by a hundred
riders.


A known issue but I am very much surprised that his builder didn't
discuss that with the client before starting any metalwork. Usually, the
drawing is reviewed in depth, and revised through several iterations,
before the build.


Surprise here, too. Before my road bike was custom built one of the
standard questions was what sort of shoes I wear and which pedals I
prefer. While my statement that I might some day use platform pedals
caused disgust in his face he ordered the perfect frame geometry for me.
I now have ... gasp ... large MTB pedals on it and a good 5cm overhang
would be fine without interference, more that I ever need. On the MTB I
could almost wear army boots and ride on the heels without wheel
interference.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #7  
Old March 10th 17, 08:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_3_]
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Posts: 1,845
Default Shoe Overlap

On 10/03/2017 3:34 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/10/2017 2:23 PM, Duane wrote:
On 10/03/2017 1:50 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/10/2017 11:14 AM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and
although it fits
great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel.
The danger of
this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out
with your foot
then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do
this because
they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then
start again
with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high
siding
because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by
a hundred
riders.


A known issue but I am very much surprised that his
builder didn't
discuss that with the client before starting any
metalwork. Usually, the
drawing is reviewed in depth, and revised through several
iterations,
before the build.


That's not unusual with a compact frame is it? My Tarmac is
like that. I found out doing a track stand in traffic and
got my toe stuck between the wheel and frame. ouch.

Though I've never had issues when actually moving as my
wheel doesn't turn that much then.


Right, and Frank touched on that as well.

My concern is that for a custom designed frame, the builder ought to
have discussed this at some point with the rider before the build. It's
not 'wrong', but some riders really hate it and will accept a longer top
tube rather than overlap if given the choice.

At any rate a custom frame shouldn't have surprises.


Agreed.
  #9  
Old March 11th 17, 12:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 2,437
Default Shoe Overlap

On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:51:25 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 3/10/2017 12:14 PM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and although it fits great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel. The danger of this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out with your foot then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do this because they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then start again with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high siding because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by a hundred riders.


I have overlap with (IIRC) two of my bikes, exacerbated by front
fenders. I've never had a problem with it. It doesn't matter once a
person's riding, because except at super low track-standish speeds, the
steering angle is not great enough to cause interference.

But I have two friends who toppled as they started from a dead stop,
both with the same cause. As they stood still, they had their front
wheel turned so the rear portion of the wheel was outside their foot, so
to speak. As they started up and tried to balance, their toe prevented
the front wheel from returning to center. No injuries; just embarrassment.


If one builds a smallish bike ( or perhaps a bike for smallish people)
with normal "road bike" dimensions it is probably impossible to make
it without toe overlap. I have four bikes, three with normal road bike
dimensions and angles. they all have toe overlap. The one bike I have
with no overlap is a mountain bike frame built as a utility bike,
solid forks and all that.

Frankly I see no problems whatsoever in riding a bike with toe overlap
as it quite simply doesn't enter the picture except at very, very,
very, slow speeds.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #10  
Old March 11th 17, 12:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 2,437
Default Shoe Overlap

On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 14:34:32 -0600, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/10/2017 2:23 PM, Duane wrote:
On 10/03/2017 1:50 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/10/2017 11:14 AM, wrote:
A friend of mine just had a custom bike built and
although it fits
great there is a 2 cm shoe overlap of the front wheel.
The danger of
this is making a hard turn and trying to straighten out
with your foot
then in the way. Criterium racers in particular could do
this because
they only stop pedalling at the absolute apex and then
start again
with the front wheel still turned.

Anyone else had any experience with this? I remember high
siding
because of this. Luckily not in a race to be run over by
a hundred
riders.


A known issue but I am very much surprised that his
builder didn't
discuss that with the client before starting any
metalwork. Usually, the
drawing is reviewed in depth, and revised through several
iterations,
before the build.


That's not unusual with a compact frame is it? My Tarmac is
like that. I found out doing a track stand in traffic and
got my toe stuck between the wheel and frame. ouch.

Though I've never had issues when actually moving as my
wheel doesn't turn that much then.


Right, and Frank touched on that as well.

My concern is that for a custom designed frame, the builder
ought to have discussed this at some point with the rider
before the build. It's not 'wrong', but some riders really
hate it and will accept a longer top tube rather than
overlap if given the choice.

At any rate a custom frame shouldn't have surprises.


One can only speculate why one would buy a custom frame if it didn't
fit, exactly, one's requirements. One can only assume that the O.P.'s
friend didn't know exactly what he wanted.
--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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