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Jan Heine on wheel building



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 14th 17, 02:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 4,412
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.

--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #2  
Old March 14th 17, 04:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 811
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 7:51:48 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.

--
- Frank Krygowski


That guy is just such a doof it's impossible to take him seriously even when what he's saying is not incorrect.
  #3  
Old March 14th 17, 08:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Gregory Sutter
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Posts: 141
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On 2017-03-14, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 7:51:48 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:

https://janheine.wordpress.com


That guy is just such a doof it's impossible to take him seriously
even when what he's saying is not incorrect.


Try. It's good for you.

--
Gregory S. Sutter Mostly Harmless

http://zer0.org/~gsutter/
  #4  
Old March 15th 17, 12:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 1,219
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 9:51:48 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Almost all of it was just simple common sense. Nothing contentious. But this sentence from the article was a bit odd:

"For each of these rim/hub combinations, we now offer spoke packages with the highest-quality, double-butted, superlight Sapim Laser spokes (2.0 – 1.5 – 2.0 mm) and aluminum nipples."

I understand his explanation of detensioning the spokes on every revolution and the thin spokes stretch more to prevent some of the detensioning. But going with $1 a piece Laser spokes of 14/17 gauge instead of the cheaper 50 cents a piece and readily available 15/14 double butted spokes from DT or Sapim. Aluminum nipples? I thought brass was the standard for reliability. Never rounds off or breaks ever.
  #5  
Old March 15th 17, 12:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 2,121
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:51:45 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.


He seems to ignore the upper spokes. If the bottom spokes become
unloaded ( looser) then, logically, the top spokes must become more
highly loaded (tighter) :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #6  
Old March 15th 17, 12:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 8,257
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On 3/14/2017 7:01 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 9:51:48 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Almost all of it was just simple common sense. Nothing contentious. But this sentence from the article was a bit odd:

"For each of these rim/hub combinations, we now offer spoke packages with the highest-quality, double-butted, superlight Sapim Laser spokes (2.0 – 1.5 – 2.0 mm) and aluminum nipples."

I understand his explanation of detensioning the spokes on every revolution and the thin spokes stretch more to prevent some of the detensioning. But going with $1 a piece Laser spokes of 14/17 gauge instead of the cheaper 50 cents a piece and readily available 15/14 double butted spokes from DT or Sapim. Aluminum nipples? I thought brass was the standard for reliability. Never rounds off or breaks ever.


+1
we build with aluminum nipples only after our admonition and
then with reluctance.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #7  
Old March 15th 17, 01:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 811
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 5:49:54 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:51:45 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.


He seems to ignore the upper spokes. If the bottom spokes become
unloaded ( looser) then, logically, the top spokes must become more
highly loaded (tighter) :-)


Are you -sure- you want to say that on this group?


  #8  
Old March 15th 17, 03:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
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Posts: 39
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

John B. wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:51:45 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.


He seems to ignore the upper spokes. If the bottom spokes become
unloaded ( looser) then, logically, the top spokes must become more
highly loaded (tighter) :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


It's a bit asymmetrical. If the rim was very "floppy", then only one spoke
at a time on the bottom would be detensioned, but a large number of upper
spokes would share the increase. As the rim gets stiffer and stiffer, then
the detensioning of the lower spokes gets more uniform and smaller. In the
ultimate case of a perfectly stiff rim, then the loss of tension in the
lower spikes would be perfectly and symmetrically compensated by an
increase in tension of the upper spokes. So you can leave less upward
margin in your spoke tension than you have to leave on the downward side.
  #9  
Old March 15th 17, 03:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,512
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On 15/03/17 11:01, wrote:
On Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 9:51:48 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.

-- - Frank Krygowski


Almost all of it was just simple common sense. Nothing contentious.
But this sentence from the article was a bit odd:

"For each of these rim/hub combinations, we now offer spoke packages
with the highest-quality, double-butted, superlight Sapim Laser
spokes (2.0 – 1.5 – 2.0 mm) and aluminum nipples."

I understand his explanation of detensioning the spokes on every
revolution and the thin spokes stretch more to prevent some of the
detensioning. But going with $1 a piece Laser spokes of 14/17 gauge
instead of the cheaper 50 cents a piece and readily available 15/14
double butted spokes from DT or Sapim. Aluminum nipples? I thought
brass was the standard for reliability. Never rounds off or breaks
ever.


I was wondering about the Al nipples too.

--
JS
  #10  
Old March 15th 17, 04:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,512
Default Jan Heine on wheel building

On 15/03/17 11:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:51:45 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

https://janheine.wordpress.com

Today's blog post is about building strong wheels.


He seems to ignore the upper spokes. If the bottom spokes become
unloaded ( looser) then, logically, the top spokes must become more
highly loaded (tighter) :-)


Not so much.

--
JS

 




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