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m-m-m-my Saronni



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 17th 17, 05:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,111
Default m-m-m-my Saronni


I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni



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  #2  
Old March 17th 17, 08:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 2,646
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.
  #3  
Old March 17th 17, 09:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,111
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.


What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2
  #4  
Old March 17th 17, 09:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 8,669
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.


What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #5  
Old March 18th 17, 05:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,628
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Classic Italian road bike. Nice.
  #6  
Old March 18th 17, 07:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,646
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.


What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.


But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.
  #7  
Old March 18th 17, 07:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,529
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 3:12:04 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.

What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.


But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.


You should change your ID to Mr. Doom and Gloom. LOL VBEG

Cheers
  #8  
Old March 19th 17, 08:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 2,914
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Classic Italian road bike. Nice.


If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #9  
Old March 19th 17, 04:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 2,646
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 12:40:05 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 3:12:04 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.

What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.


But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.


You should change your ID to Mr. Doom and Gloom. LOL VBEG

Cheers


Mr. Doom and Gloom had three carbon fiber forks break on him. In one case there was no serious injuries incurred.

In the the second I received a severe concussion and had no short term memory and was having seizures for over two years before my best friend got me to a neurologist who knew how to treat them. It took me six months before the proper dosage and proper medications were settled and another two years to get more or less back to normal. When I "came too" I had gone from 210 lbs to 142 lbs and my doctors had simply assumed that I had some sort of indetectable cancer. The way I felt and because I couldn't remember anything I was on the verge of suicide. Luckily that only lasted until I started to gain weight. I am missing over 20 years of important memories.

The third CF fork broke just last year and dumped me in a stone lined culvert at 25 mph. Luckily everything but my head hit.

Do you suppose people like you shouldn't know the dangers? That you should know to inform people close to you that these things are possible and IF they were to occur that they should know what to do?

Or are you one of those who believe that ignorance is better than knowledge?
  #10  
Old March 19th 17, 04:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,646
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni


Classic Italian road bike. Nice.


If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.


John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.
 




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