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m-m-m-my Saronni



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 19th 17, 08:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,289
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:03:57 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 12:40:05 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 3:12:04 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.

What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.

But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.


You should change your ID to Mr. Doom and Gloom. LOL VBEG

Cheers


Mr. Doom and Gloom had three carbon fiber forks break on him. In one case there was no serious injuries incurred.

In the the second I received a severe concussion and had no short term memory and was having seizures for over two years before my best friend got me to a neurologist who knew how to treat them. It took me six months before the proper dosage and proper medications were settled and another two years to get more or less back to normal. When I "came too" I had gone from 210 lbs to 142 lbs and my doctors had simply assumed that I had some sort of indetectable cancer. The way I felt and because I couldn't remember anything I was on the verge of suicide. Luckily that only lasted until I started to gain weight. I am missing over 20 years of important memories.

The third CF fork broke just last year and dumped me in a stone lined culvert at 25 mph. Luckily everything but my head hit.

Do you suppose people like you shouldn't know the dangers? That you should know to inform people close to you that these things are possible and IF they were to occur that they should know what to do?

Or are you one of those who believe that ignorance is better than knowledge?


What broke on your forks (steerer, fork leg, crown) and why? How old were the forks? What brands? Any warning signs?

I've been riding CF forks since maybe 1989 and haven't broken any. For most of that time I weighed between 195lbs and 220lbs. Riding included a decade or two of racing. I do have some concerns about carbon steerers and too light forks, and knowing why you had so many bad forks would be enlightening for us all.

-- Jay Beattie.
Ads
  #12  
Old March 19th 17, 08:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,289
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.


If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.


John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.


I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago. http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.
  #13  
Old March 20th 17, 12:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,121
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:22:13 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.

If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.


John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.


I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago.

http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.


Well, I can't say that I made a whole career of searching for
"Saronni" bicycles but a casual search did seem to show that it is
likely that "Saronni" was not the name of a brand of bicycles but
rather was the name that Colnago gave to specific versions of his
bicycles.

And the bike that the O.P. referenced seemed to exhibit a similarity
to the Colnago version.

You will note that I wrote "If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it..."

Of course, an alternate explanation is decals are fairly cheaply
obtainable :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #14  
Old March 20th 17, 09:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,659
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:17:56 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:03:57 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 12:40:05 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 3:12:04 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.

What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.

But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.

You should change your ID to Mr. Doom and Gloom. LOL VBEG

Cheers


Mr. Doom and Gloom had three carbon fiber forks break on him. In one case there was no serious injuries incurred.

In the the second I received a severe concussion and had no short term memory and was having seizures for over two years before my best friend got me to a neurologist who knew how to treat them. It took me six months before the proper dosage and proper medications were settled and another two years to get more or less back to normal. When I "came too" I had gone from 210 lbs to 142 lbs and my doctors had simply assumed that I had some sort of indetectable cancer. The way I felt and because I couldn't remember anything I was on the verge of suicide. Luckily that only lasted until I started to gain weight. I am missing over 20 years of important memories.

The third CF fork broke just last year and dumped me in a stone lined culvert at 25 mph. Luckily everything but my head hit.

Do you suppose people like you shouldn't know the dangers? That you should know to inform people close to you that these things are possible and IF they were to occur that they should know what to do?

Or are you one of those who believe that ignorance is better than knowledge?


What broke on your forks (steerer, fork leg, crown) and why? How old were the forks? What brands? Any warning signs?

I've been riding CF forks since maybe 1989 and haven't broken any. For most of that time I weighed between 195lbs and 220lbs. Riding included a decade or two of racing. I do have some concerns about carbon steerers and too light forks, and knowing why you had so many bad forks would be enlightening for us all.


Forks were mid-2000's. There was NO warnings and if the bike was going straight after that bump I may not have known that it had cracked until it was in the work stand at the end of the ride.

The first fork cracked visibly at the bend at the head. I don't remember that well. The second fork failed because it was incorrectly constructed. And this fork was the Colnago Star fork - the lightest one they make.

However, carbon bikes are being make lighter and lighter. 16 lb ready to ride are common and some people brag of 12 lb bikes. These guys also tend to carry flat repair kits in their jersey pockets to show how light their bikes are.

Bikes of this weight will fail catastrophically.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zn29u7GoqPk

While on a 40 mile ride yesterday I was overtaken by a kid on a steel bike. While talking he said that he had a steel bike fail, it had a circular fracture of the seattube and the chainstay. He said that the only way he could tell was that the bike felt a little bendy when he stood to accelerate.

My experience is that when metal bikes fail they are not catastrophic but reduced performance.
  #15  
Old March 20th 17, 09:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,659
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 5:30:30 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:22:13 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.

If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.

John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.


I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago.

http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.


Well, I can't say that I made a whole career of searching for
"Saronni" bicycles but a casual search did seem to show that it is
likely that "Saronni" was not the name of a brand of bicycles but
rather was the name that Colnago gave to specific versions of his
bicycles.

And the bike that the O.P. referenced seemed to exhibit a similarity
to the Colnago version.

You will note that I wrote "If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it..."

Of course, an alternate explanation is decals are fairly cheaply
obtainable :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


Colnago apparently put the Saronni name on two models - the Super and the Mexico. I think these were the same but the Mexico was given that name because of the Olympics that year.

But the majority of Saronni's were not built by Colnago and weren't of that quality even Alan built an aluminum Saronni.

I can't find any non-Colnago Saronni's to show the frame differences now.

He won the Giro twice and was the main competitor of Francesco Moser. He is still alive and a whole lot younger than I am today.

I have seen Saronni frames that were trash. But that could have been Saronni decals on bad frames to begin with. I don't remember if they had the Saronni name on the fork heads or the seat stay ends. But they dod have those awful mile long horizontal dropouts without adjusters.
  #16  
Old March 20th 17, 10:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,270
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On 3/20/2017 4:38 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 5:30:30 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:22:13 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.

If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.

John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.

I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago.

http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.


Well, I can't say that I made a whole career of searching for
"Saronni" bicycles but a casual search did seem to show that it is
likely that "Saronni" was not the name of a brand of bicycles but
rather was the name that Colnago gave to specific versions of his
bicycles.

And the bike that the O.P. referenced seemed to exhibit a similarity
to the Colnago version.

You will note that I wrote "If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it..."

Of course, an alternate explanation is decals are fairly cheaply
obtainable :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


Colnago apparently put the Saronni name on two models - the Super and the Mexico. I think these were the same but the Mexico was given that name because of the Olympics that year.

But the majority of Saronni's were not built by Colnago and weren't of that quality even Alan built an aluminum Saronni.

I can't find any non-Colnago Saronni's to show the frame differences now.

He won the Giro twice and was the main competitor of Francesco Moser. He is still alive and a whole lot younger than I am today.

I have seen Saronni frames that were trash. But that could have been Saronni decals on bad frames to begin with. I don't remember if they had the Saronni name on the fork heads or the seat stay ends. But they dod have those awful mile long horizontal dropouts without adjusters.


Colnago Saronni:
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Ita...go_Saronni.htm

Colnago Master Saronni
http://www.cyclinside.com/Storia-del...i-Saronni.html

note fancy-shape lugs

Saronni not made at Colnago:

http://www.walkingaround.it/prodotto...ni-80s-vintage


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #17  
Old March 21st 17, 12:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,289
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 2:15:34 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:17:56 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:03:57 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 12:40:05 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 3:12:04 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:57:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/17/2017 4:21 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 1:52:28 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, March 17, 2017 at 10:02:34 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
I really liked this bike.
Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Saronni's were sort of bottom top-end bikes. They were manufactured by a variety of makers so one could be nearly perfect while another badly brazed and fitted poorly.

What can be known from the heart-shaped cutouts on the lugs? I mean, they are there, but look sloppy/carelessly made

tinyurl.com/saronni-lug1
tinyurl.com/saronni-lug2


Nothing useful can be known from that.

Although we in sales speak of 'lug cuts', implying some old
Italian guy for hours with a very small file, the various
standard shapes are punched from standard lug blanks (or
cast in standard angles). Clean braze flow looks nicer,
yes, but most of the oopsies are usually in the paint.

Your seatstay top plugs are also dirt cheap and offered for
pennies with anything you like cut into them.

But what you can't see under the lugs is important. The tubing ends have to be fitted tightly to the tube it is meeting with - the top tube fitted to the head tube has to have the proper angle cut into it. If you do not have this the frame flexes a bit around that joint. The bike just doesn't feel correct. The downtube and seat tube fitting against the bottom bracket as well. If you look into a well made frame you won't see any gaps and the brazing runs right up to the edge of the connections so that you can't tell the difference between the tube and the BB casting. The older French bikes had this sloppy fitting and so they gave the bike long geometry so that you couldn't turn fast enough for it to be a problem.

My local bike shop owner was Clarence Witt and he made some of the finest frames I've ever seen. I was never able to afford one until after he stopped building.

You should change your ID to Mr. Doom and Gloom. LOL VBEG

Cheers

Mr. Doom and Gloom had three carbon fiber forks break on him. In one case there was no serious injuries incurred.

In the the second I received a severe concussion and had no short term memory and was having seizures for over two years before my best friend got me to a neurologist who knew how to treat them. It took me six months before the proper dosage and proper medications were settled and another two years to get more or less back to normal. When I "came too" I had gone from 210 lbs to 142 lbs and my doctors had simply assumed that I had some sort of indetectable cancer. The way I felt and because I couldn't remember anything I was on the verge of suicide. Luckily that only lasted until I started to gain weight. I am missing over 20 years of important memories.

The third CF fork broke just last year and dumped me in a stone lined culvert at 25 mph. Luckily everything but my head hit.

Do you suppose people like you shouldn't know the dangers? That you should know to inform people close to you that these things are possible and IF they were to occur that they should know what to do?

Or are you one of those who believe that ignorance is better than knowledge?


What broke on your forks (steerer, fork leg, crown) and why? How old were the forks? What brands? Any warning signs?

I've been riding CF forks since maybe 1989 and haven't broken any. For most of that time I weighed between 195lbs and 220lbs. Riding included a decade or two of racing. I do have some concerns about carbon steerers and too light forks, and knowing why you had so many bad forks would be enlightening for us all.


Forks were mid-2000's. There was NO warnings and if the bike was going straight after that bump I may not have known that it had cracked until it was in the work stand at the end of the ride.

The first fork cracked visibly at the bend at the head. I don't remember that well. The second fork failed because it was incorrectly constructed. And this fork was the Colnago Star fork - the lightest one they make.

However, carbon bikes are being make lighter and lighter. 16 lb ready to ride are common and some people brag of 12 lb bikes. These guys also tend to carry flat repair kits in their jersey pockets to show how light their bikes are.

Bikes of this weight will fail catastrophically.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zn29u7GoqPk

While on a 40 mile ride yesterday I was overtaken by a kid on a steel bike. While talking he said that he had a steel bike fail, it had a circular fracture of the seattube and the chainstay. He said that the only way he could tell was that the bike felt a little bendy when he stood to accelerate.

My experience is that when metal bikes fail they are not catastrophic but reduced performance.


True, although Frank had a catastrophic steel fork failure on a tandem, and I knew another guy who had the same problem on a different custom steel tandem. I don't know why these tandems were a problem. I saw some bad forks back in the '80s on some Italian bikes that were just tack brazed or poorly brazed. Paint can cover a lot. They didn't fail but would have if the problem hadn't been caught as part of a new paint job.

I don't know anyone who doesn't ride carbon forks on their "fast" bike. Even the steel frame guys have carbon forks. Not saying carbon forks are perfect, but they do seem to be passing the test -- and they should be getting better with the new resins. I would not, however, go with the bleeding edge stuff. Not at my weight and age.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #18  
Old March 21st 17, 03:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,659
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 3:14:23 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/20/2017 4:38 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 5:30:30 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:22:13 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.

If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.

John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.

I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago.
http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.

Well, I can't say that I made a whole career of searching for
"Saronni" bicycles but a casual search did seem to show that it is
likely that "Saronni" was not the name of a brand of bicycles but
rather was the name that Colnago gave to specific versions of his
bicycles.

And the bike that the O.P. referenced seemed to exhibit a similarity
to the Colnago version.

You will note that I wrote "If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it..."

Of course, an alternate explanation is decals are fairly cheaply
obtainable :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


Colnago apparently put the Saronni name on two models - the Super and the Mexico. I think these were the same but the Mexico was given that name because of the Olympics that year.

But the majority of Saronni's were not built by Colnago and weren't of that quality even Alan built an aluminum Saronni.

I can't find any non-Colnago Saronni's to show the frame differences now.

He won the Giro twice and was the main competitor of Francesco Moser. He is still alive and a whole lot younger than I am today.

I have seen Saronni frames that were trash. But that could have been Saronni decals on bad frames to begin with. I don't remember if they had the Saronni name on the fork heads or the seat stay ends. But they dod have those awful mile long horizontal dropouts without adjusters.


Colnago Saronni:
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Ita...go_Saronni.htm

Colnago Master Saronni
http://www.cyclinside.com/Storia-del...i-Saronni.html

note fancy-shape lugs

Saronni not made at Colnago:

http://www.walkingaround.it/prodotto...ni-80s-vintage


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


For those that don't read Italian it said that Colango issued a limited edition of Colnago Saronni's.

Here's a real weird one: An Alan marked as a Colnago Saronni.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-1980s-A...AOSw~AVYscE D

Here is even a weirder one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-ital...QAAOSw8w1X-jaL

This one appears to be a Colnago with no Colnago markings on it. Just the Saronni emblems.
  #19  
Old March 21st 17, 03:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,270
Default m-m-m-my Saronni

On 3/21/2017 10:06 AM, wrote:
On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 3:14:23 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/20/2017 4:38 PM,
wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 5:30:30 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:22:13 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 9:07:17 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 1:31:21 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 12:57:51 -0500, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Doug Landau
wrote:

I really liked this bike. Not sure why I got rid of it, except I guess
it was just time for something new, just for a change. Paid $150 for
it ready to ride.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/saronni

Classic Italian road bike. Nice.

If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it is worth, depending on the group
set, upwards from, perhaps, $1,000.

Do a bit of goggling as the Colnago Saronni has some very identifiable
features which, if your bike has them, should serve as provenance.
--
Cheers,

John B.

John, what you're talking about is a Colnago with the model designation of Saronni.

The bike in question is a Saronni which I don't think had much connection with Giuseppe except to pay him a fee for the use of his name. Moser was the same way I believe.

I've seen some posts indicating that some of the Saronni brand bikes were made by Colnago.
http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16395

-- Jay Beattie.

Well, I can't say that I made a whole career of searching for
"Saronni" bicycles but a casual search did seem to show that it is
likely that "Saronni" was not the name of a brand of bicycles but
rather was the name that Colnago gave to specific versions of his
bicycles.

And the bike that the O.P. referenced seemed to exhibit a similarity
to the Colnago version.

You will note that I wrote "If that is a Colnago Saronni bike it..."

Of course, an alternate explanation is decals are fairly cheaply
obtainable :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

Colnago apparently put the Saronni name on two models - the Super and the Mexico. I think these were the same but the Mexico was given that name because of the Olympics that year.

But the majority of Saronni's were not built by Colnago and weren't of that quality even Alan built an aluminum Saronni.

I can't find any non-Colnago Saronni's to show the frame differences now.

He won the Giro twice and was the main competitor of Francesco Moser. He is still alive and a whole lot younger than I am today.

I have seen Saronni frames that were trash. But that could have been Saronni decals on bad frames to begin with. I don't remember if they had the Saronni name on the fork heads or the seat stay ends. But they dod have those awful mile long horizontal dropouts without adjusters.


Colnago Saronni:
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Ita...go_Saronni.htm

Colnago Master Saronni
http://www.cyclinside.com/Storia-del...i-Saronni.html

note fancy-shape lugs

Saronni not made at Colnago:

http://www.walkingaround.it/prodotto...ni-80s-vintage


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


For those that don't read Italian it said that Colango issued a limited edition of Colnago Saronni's.

Here's a real weird one: An Alan marked as a Colnago Saronni.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-1980s-A...AOSw~AVYscE D

Here is even a weirder one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-ital...QAAOSw8w1X-jaL

This one appears to be a Colnago with no Colnago markings on it. Just the Saronni emblems.


Construction details don't lend themselves to a Colnago
conclusion on that last one.
And BTW just everybody slapped stickers on Alans for Cross
season back then:

http://s6.photobucket.com/user/threa...344-1.jpg.html

http://www.velospace.org/files/guercyclofoest.jpg

https://myalbum.com/photo/36fomqp64jcA/1k0.jpg
etc etc

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


 




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