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  #21  
Old May 13th 17, 11:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,219
Default Shimano Headset

wrote:
On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 6:57:35 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 12 May 2017 08:23:02 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a chain tool
the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation and the
workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

-
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that includes a
chain-breaker. That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair
only takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig
stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it? For
someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across people
with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on the
technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker and spare
link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.

To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in the field
sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think up. Such a
repaired chain would most likely fail again after only a short
distance. Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are
used to fix a chain.

Cheers


Out of curiosity I weighed and measured the chain tool that I carry in
my bike tool kit. It is 2-1/2 inches in length and 2-1/8 inches in
height. 1/2 inch thick, at its thickest, and weighs 2.6 ounces. It
works with chains up to and including 10 speed chains (I don't own an
11 speed). Frankly, as a broken chain immobilizes the bicycle I can
see no logic in not carrying it.

--
Cheers,

John B.


Whether I carry a chaintool is the result of the probability a chain
breaks multiplied with the severity of the consequences when it happens.
The outcome for me is off road I carry one, on my roadbikes I don't. This
applies for all tools.

Lou


My multi-tool thing has a chain tool so I carry one all the time. I don't
think I've used one in over 20 years though. Last time I used one it was
handy to have though.


https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5020-5...i-Tool#reviews
--
duane
Ads
  #22  
Old May 13th 17, 12:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51
Default Shimano Headset

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 12:13:42 PM UTC+2, Duane wrote:
wrote:
On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 6:57:35 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 12 May 2017 08:23:02 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a chain tool
the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation and the
workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

-
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that includes a
chain-breaker. That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair
only takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig
stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it? For
someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across people
with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on the
technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker and spare
link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.

To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in the field
sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think up. Such a
repaired chain would most likely fail again after only a short
distance. Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are
used to fix a chain.

Cheers

Out of curiosity I weighed and measured the chain tool that I carry in
my bike tool kit. It is 2-1/2 inches in length and 2-1/8 inches in
height. 1/2 inch thick, at its thickest, and weighs 2.6 ounces. It
works with chains up to and including 10 speed chains (I don't own an
11 speed). Frankly, as a broken chain immobilizes the bicycle I can
see no logic in not carrying it.

--
Cheers,

John B.


Whether I carry a chaintool is the result of the probability a chain
breaks multiplied with the severity of the consequences when it happens.
The outcome for me is off road I carry one, on my roadbikes I don't. This
applies for all tools.

Lou


My multi-tool thing has a chain tool so I carry one all the time.


I don't carry a multitool on my roadbikes either.

I don't
think I've used one in over 20 years though.


There you go ....

Last time I used one it was
handy to have though.


What would have happened when you didn't carry one at that moment?



https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5020-5...i-Tool#reviews


168 gram Geezzzz.. ;-)

Lou


  #23  
Old May 13th 17, 03:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,502
Default Shimano Headset

On 2017-05-12 13:38, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 9:36:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 08:23, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a
chain tool the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation
and the workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that
includes a chain-breaker.



Most? Most cyclists don't even carry a first aid kit and that is
way more important than a chain breaker tool. I have used mine
multiple times. Never for myself.

Still debating with myself whether to schlepp the CPR mask. It's
light but adds volume.


... That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair only
takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig
stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it?
For someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across
people with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on
the technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker
and spare link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.


I usually only carry tools where there is hardly any alternative.
For breaking a chain there is.


To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in
the field sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think
up. Such a repaired chain would most likely fail again after only
a short distance.



So why did they never fail?


... Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are
used to fix a chain.


I might get one of those. One of these days, as grandpa Kettle
would have said. If I find a really tiny one on sale for a good
price.

I might even consider a new headset for the road bike. Maybe :-)


When was the last time you needed a CPR mask?



Personally never but I know others who had to use theirs.


... When was the last time you needed a chain tool?



I never did because I used the kludge method :-)


... Hmmm. Seems to be an easy choice, no?


Not really. A failed chain repair results in annoyance, a failed CPR
attempt results in a lot of grief for a family.


If you find a lifeless person on the trail -- in the middle of
nowhere with the mountain lions circling -- remember that you will
have to do compressions until the helicopter arrives. Now consider
this: http://jaha.ahajournals.org/content/5/3/e002819 You're probably
better off sitting down and writing a condolence letter.


I have a very different opinion and so have the fire chiefs around here
where I did my last refresher class. A low survival rate is not a reason
to give up.


OR, you could get a super light-weight AED (assuming the dead guy had
V-fib and wasn't totally dead).
http://www.aed.com/philips-heartstar...FVJbfgodvGkHNQ
I think Nashbar has one that comes in a seat pack. You could also get
one of these:
https://ideasinspiringinnovation.fil...ce_kenya-2.jpg

Plus, if you witness a riding companion going down and dying, you
can just do compressions these days -- which is kind of
mind-boggling.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056...00005253422101
https://lifeinthefastlane.com/ccc/compression-only-cpr/

Or, you can choose to ride with companions who do not have
communicable diseases and on whose mouths you are not afraid to
perform mouth-to-mouth, obviating the need for a special mask. Ride
with some of those women from Muzi's body-paint link.


You can always rip a plastic bag which I always have on the bike and use
that as shield. However, a CPR mask provide a much more effective air
passage way. Take a look at one if you never have so far. They have them
at fire stations.

We just had a case here where a very healthy and trim looking runner
collapsed on a MUP and the docs later said that without strangers
administering CPR she'd be gone now.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #24  
Old May 13th 17, 05:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,338
Default Shimano Headset

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 7:26:43 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 13:38, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 9:36:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 08:23, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a
chain tool the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation
and the workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that
includes a chain-breaker.


Most? Most cyclists don't even carry a first aid kit and that is
way more important than a chain breaker tool. I have used mine
multiple times. Never for myself.

Still debating with myself whether to schlepp the CPR mask. It's
light but adds volume.


... That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair only
takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig
stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it?
For someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across
people with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on
the technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker
and spare link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.


I usually only carry tools where there is hardly any alternative.
For breaking a chain there is.


To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in
the field sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think
up. Such a repaired chain would most likely fail again after only
a short distance.


So why did they never fail?


... Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are
used to fix a chain.


I might get one of those. One of these days, as grandpa Kettle
would have said. If I find a really tiny one on sale for a good
price.

I might even consider a new headset for the road bike. Maybe :-)


When was the last time you needed a CPR mask?



Personally never but I know others who had to use theirs.


... When was the last time you needed a chain tool?



I never did because I used the kludge method :-)


... Hmmm. Seems to be an easy choice, no?


Not really. A failed chain repair results in annoyance, a failed CPR
attempt results in a lot of grief for a family.


If you find a lifeless person on the trail -- in the middle of
nowhere with the mountain lions circling -- remember that you will
have to do compressions until the helicopter arrives. Now consider
this: http://jaha.ahajournals.org/content/5/3/e002819 You're probably
better off sitting down and writing a condolence letter.


I have a very different opinion and so have the fire chiefs around here
where I did my last refresher class. A low survival rate is not a reason
to give up.


OR, you could get a super light-weight AED (assuming the dead guy had
V-fib and wasn't totally dead).
http://www.aed.com/philips-heartstar...FVJbfgodvGkHNQ
I think Nashbar has one that comes in a seat pack. You could also get
one of these:
https://ideasinspiringinnovation.fil...ce_kenya-2.jpg

Plus, if you witness a riding companion going down and dying, you
can just do compressions these days -- which is kind of
mind-boggling.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056...00005253422101
https://lifeinthefastlane.com/ccc/compression-only-cpr/

Or, you can choose to ride with companions who do not have
communicable diseases and on whose mouths you are not afraid to
perform mouth-to-mouth, obviating the need for a special mask. Ride
with some of those women from Muzi's body-paint link.


You can always rip a plastic bag which I always have on the bike and use
that as shield. However, a CPR mask provide a much more effective air
passage way. Take a look at one if you never have so far. They have them
at fire stations.

We just had a case here where a very healthy and trim looking runner
collapsed on a MUP and the docs later said that without strangers
administering CPR she'd be gone now.



I did CPR on hundreds of people over six years of working ambulance, most with a ventilator of one type or another (demand valve/Hope/Ambu bag) except sometimes mouth to mouth on babies. Survival rate after (like I said) an unwitnesssed event was really low. Doing manual compression for more than half an hour is exhausting and, again, usually unavailing outside an ER where you can correct blood chemistry and place an ET tube.

Masks and simple airways (as opposed to an ET tube) and mouth-to-mouth all have the same problem -- they can put a lot of air into the stomach. One thing good about a mask is that it prevents patients from vomiting into your mouth -- although if you do CPR and ventilation enough, you know when the vomit is coming. With a long transport doing CPR with a simple airway, vomit is inevitable -- and thus all ambulances had suction machines, unlike guys on bikes.

Witnessed heart attacks are a whole other thing and survival rate is higher with CPR. Finding some guy dead on the trail . . . not so much.

BTW, you may get a better seal with your own lips than a mask, although my only experience on adults is with a doll. Resusci Annie was super hot! https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/i...da641c0270.jpg

Annie, wake up! Annie . . . I got my advanced first-aid and CPR card when I was 16 and did my first CPR at 16. That's all you needed to work ambulance back then -- CPR and advanced first-aid. You also needed to be 18, but the guy who owned the company was a family friend and was happy to let me work. My first CPR was on a guy who was practically in rigor, but my boss wanted me to do CPR because he knew the family and wanted to give them hope. Very odd. The hospital was ****ed off at us. It was basically a removal -- something I did for a job a few years later.

I also remember the exact moment I decided I did not want to be a doctor -- doing CPR on a baby and recalling the relief I felt when handing the baby off to an ER doctor. I had a soft spot for babies. I was much more accustomed to adults dying off.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #25  
Old May 13th 17, 08:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andrew Chaplin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 207
Default Shimano Headset

Duane wrote in
:

My multi-tool thing has a chain tool so I carry one all the time. I
don't think I've used one in over 20 years though. Last time I used
one it was handy to have though.


https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5020-5...i-Tool#reviews


That is similar to the one I carry--along with my Leatherman Juice, which
has a corkscrew.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
  #26  
Old May 13th 17, 09:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,959
Default Shimano Headset

On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 9:57:35 PM UTC-7, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 12 May 2017 08:23:02 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a chain tool
the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation and the
workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

-
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that includes a chain-breaker. That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair only takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it? For someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across people with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on the technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker and spare link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.

To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in the field sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think up. Such a repaired chain would most likely fail again after only a short distance. Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are used to fix a chain.

Cheers


Out of curiosity I weighed and measured the chain tool that I carry in
my bike tool kit. It is 2-1/2 inches in length and 2-1/8 inches in
height. 1/2 inch thick, at its thickest, and weighs 2.6 ounces. It
works with chains up to and including 10 speed chains (I don't own an
11 speed). Frankly, as a broken chain immobilizes the bicycle I can
see no logic in not carrying it.


Since I have never once had a broken chain nor seen one I cannot see any requirement to carry such a tool. Yesterday I did 55 miles and 2500 feet of climbing with some of it pretty steep ~12%. There were fore of us there and the dirt encrusted on the bikes showed a certain lack of careful maintenance. No one had any problems. I have been carrying all these tools around for the last 6 years and the only one's I've used are the tire repair tools.
  #27  
Old May 13th 17, 09:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,959
Default Shimano Headset

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 9:45:49 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 7:26:43 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 13:38, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 9:36:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 08:23, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a
chain tool the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation
and the workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that
includes a chain-breaker.


Most? Most cyclists don't even carry a first aid kit and that is
way more important than a chain breaker tool. I have used mine
multiple times. Never for myself.

Still debating with myself whether to schlepp the CPR mask. It's
light but adds volume.


... That way a broken chain isn't an ememrgency and a repair only
takes a few seconds. After all seconds count when you're beig
stalked by mountain lions or other hungry critters doesn't it?
For someone who either breaks chains a lot or often comes across
people with a broken chain (bother very rare where I ride even on
the technical trails) it ONLY makes sense to have a chain breaker
and spare link(s)and quick-link WITH YOU.


I usually only carry tools where there is hardly any alternative.
For breaking a chain there is.


To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in
the field sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think
up. Such a repaired chain would most likely fail again after only
a short distance.


So why did they never fail?


... Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain breakers are
used to fix a chain.


I might get one of those. One of these days, as grandpa Kettle
would have said. If I find a really tiny one on sale for a good
price.

I might even consider a new headset for the road bike. Maybe :-)

When was the last time you needed a CPR mask?



Personally never but I know others who had to use theirs.


... When was the last time you needed a chain tool?



I never did because I used the kludge method :-)


... Hmmm. Seems to be an easy choice, no?


Not really. A failed chain repair results in annoyance, a failed CPR
attempt results in a lot of grief for a family.


If you find a lifeless person on the trail -- in the middle of
nowhere with the mountain lions circling -- remember that you will
have to do compressions until the helicopter arrives. Now consider
this: http://jaha.ahajournals.org/content/5/3/e002819 You're probably
better off sitting down and writing a condolence letter.


I have a very different opinion and so have the fire chiefs around here
where I did my last refresher class. A low survival rate is not a reason
to give up.


OR, you could get a super light-weight AED (assuming the dead guy had
V-fib and wasn't totally dead).
http://www.aed.com/philips-heartstar...FVJbfgodvGkHNQ
I think Nashbar has one that comes in a seat pack. You could also get
one of these:
https://ideasinspiringinnovation.fil...ce_kenya-2.jpg

Plus, if you witness a riding companion going down and dying, you
can just do compressions these days -- which is kind of
mind-boggling.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056...00005253422101
https://lifeinthefastlane.com/ccc/compression-only-cpr/

Or, you can choose to ride with companions who do not have
communicable diseases and on whose mouths you are not afraid to
perform mouth-to-mouth, obviating the need for a special mask. Ride
with some of those women from Muzi's body-paint link.


You can always rip a plastic bag which I always have on the bike and use
that as shield. However, a CPR mask provide a much more effective air
passage way. Take a look at one if you never have so far. They have them
at fire stations.

We just had a case here where a very healthy and trim looking runner
collapsed on a MUP and the docs later said that without strangers
administering CPR she'd be gone now.



I did CPR on hundreds of people over six years of working ambulance, most with a ventilator of one type or another (demand valve/Hope/Ambu bag) except sometimes mouth to mouth on babies. Survival rate after (like I said) an unwitnesssed event was really low. Doing manual compression for more than half an hour is exhausting and, again, usually unavailing outside an ER where you can correct blood chemistry and place an ET tube.

Masks and simple airways (as opposed to an ET tube) and mouth-to-mouth all have the same problem -- they can put a lot of air into the stomach. One thing good about a mask is that it prevents patients from vomiting into your mouth -- although if you do CPR and ventilation enough, you know when the vomit is coming. With a long transport doing CPR with a simple airway, vomit is inevitable -- and thus all ambulances had suction machines, unlike guys on bikes.

Witnessed heart attacks are a whole other thing and survival rate is higher with CPR. Finding some guy dead on the trail . . . not so much.

BTW, you may get a better seal with your own lips than a mask, although my only experience on adults is with a doll. Resusci Annie was super hot! https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/i...da641c0270.jpg

Annie, wake up! Annie . . . I got my advanced first-aid and CPR card when I was 16 and did my first CPR at 16. That's all you needed to work ambulance back then -- CPR and advanced first-aid. You also needed to be 18, but the guy who owned the company was a family friend and was happy to let me work. My first CPR was on a guy who was practically in rigor, but my boss wanted me to do CPR because he knew the family and wanted to give them hope. Very odd. The hospital was ****ed off at us. It was basically a removal -- something I did for a job a few years later.

I also remember the exact moment I decided I did not want to be a doctor -- doing CPR on a baby and recalling the relief I felt when handing the baby off to an ER doctor. I had a soft spot for babies. I was much more accustomed to adults dying off.


Jay - You couldn't be suggesting that you let a friend die rather than try anything because it is usually ineffective in the long run?
  #28  
Old May 13th 17, 09:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,502
Default Shimano Headset

On 2017-05-13 09:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 7:26:43 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-05-12 13:38, jbeattie wrote:


[...]



OR, you could get a super light-weight AED (assuming the dead guy
had V-fib and wasn't totally dead).
http://www.aed.com/philips-heartstar...FVJbfgodvGkHNQ


I think Nashbar has one that comes in a seat pack. You could also get
one of these:
https://ideasinspiringinnovation.fil...ce_kenya-2.jpg



Plus, if you witness a riding companion going down and dying, you
can just do compressions these days -- which is kind of
mind-boggling.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056...00005253422101
https://lifeinthefastlane.com/ccc/compression-only-cpr/

Or, you can choose to ride with companions who do not have
communicable diseases and on whose mouths you are not afraid to
perform mouth-to-mouth, obviating the need for a special mask.
Ride with some of those women from Muzi's body-paint link.


You can always rip a plastic bag which I always have on the bike
and use that as shield. However, a CPR mask provide a much more
effective air passage way. Take a look at one if you never have so
far. They have them at fire stations.

We just had a case here where a very healthy and trim looking
runner collapsed on a MUP and the docs later said that without
strangers administering CPR she'd be gone now.



I did CPR on hundreds of people over six years of working ambulance,
most with a ventilator of one type or another (demand valve/Hope/Ambu
bag) except sometimes mouth to mouth on babies. Survival rate after
(like I said) an unwitnesssed event was really low. Doing manual
compression for more than half an hour is exhausting and, again,
usually unavailing outside an ER where you can correct blood
chemistry and place an ET tube.


Half an hour is a long time. If in the boonies where response times are
that long one can only hope that the person's heart springs back into
action after a while. One instructor said "If she slaps you in the face
you know her pulse is back" :-)


Masks and simple airways (as opposed to an ET tube) and
mouth-to-mouth all have the same problem -- they can put a lot of air
into the stomach. One thing good about a mask is that it prevents
patients from vomiting into your mouth -- although if you do CPR and
ventilation enough, you know when the vomit is coming. With a long
transport doing CPR with a simple airway, vomit is inevitable -- and
thus all ambulances had suction machines, unlike guys on bikes.

Witnessed heart attacks are a whole other thing and survival rate is
higher with CPR. Finding some guy dead on the trail . . . not so
much.

BTW, you may get a better seal with your own lips than a mask,
although my only experience on adults is with a doll. Resusci Annie
was super hot!
https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/i...da641c0270.jpg


Oh yeah :-)

Ours were much more bland.


Annie, wake up! Annie . . . I got my advanced first-aid and CPR card
when I was 16 and did my first CPR at 16. That's all you needed to
work ambulance back then -- CPR and advanced first-aid. You also
needed to be 18, but the guy who owned the company was a family
friend and was happy to let me work. My first CPR was on a guy who
was practically in rigor, but my boss wanted me to do CPR because he
knew the family and wanted to give them hope. Very odd. The hospital
was ****ed off at us. It was basically a removal -- something I did
for a job a few years later.

I also remember the exact moment I decided I did not want to be a
doctor -- doing CPR on a baby and recalling the relief I felt when
handing the baby off to an ER doctor. I had a soft spot for babies. I
was much more accustomed to adults dying off.


I can't imagine doing ambulance work for long, or work in the accident
surgery department where my wife worked many years.

AFAIR the worst CPR our last instructor mentioned was in a suicide case.

I just want to be prepared in case I come upon someone where the heart
stopped for some reason. Never had to so far but who knows.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #29  
Old May 13th 17, 09:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 4,570
Default Shimano Headset

On 5/13/2017 4:17 PM, Joerg wrote:

I just want to be prepared in case I come upon someone where the heart
stopped for some reason. Never had to so far but who knows.


We know you live in a very dangerous universe.

Don't forget your meteorite deflector!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #30  
Old May 13th 17, 09:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 3,502
Default Shimano Headset

On 2017-05-13 13:05, wrote:
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 9:57:35 PM UTC-7, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 12 May 2017 08:23:02 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 10:06:04 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
But then, to one who habitually uses a nail and a rock as a
chain tool the use of proper tools is probably a mystery.


Try to differentiate between an outdoors emergency situation
and the workshop in the garage. It's not that difficult.

- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Which is hy mose of us carry a small tool repair kit that
includes a chain-breaker. That way a broken chain isn't an
ememrgency and a repair only takes a few seconds. After all
seconds count when you're beig stalked by mountain lions or other
hungry critters doesn't it? For someone who either breaks chains
a lot or often comes across people with a broken chain (bother
very rare where I ride even on the technical trails) it ONLY
makes sense to have a chain breaker and spare link(s)and
quick-link WITH YOU.

To be honest using a rock and rusty nail to repair a chain in the
field sounds like something an armchair bicyclist would think up.
Such a repaired chain would most likely fail again after only a
short distance. Believe it or not there's good reasons why chain
breakers are used to fix a chain.

Cheers


Out of curiosity I weighed and measured the chain tool that I carry
in my bike tool kit. It is 2-1/2 inches in length and 2-1/8 inches
in height. 1/2 inch thick, at its thickest, and weighs 2.6 ounces.
It works with chains up to and including 10 speed chains (I don't
own an 11 speed). Frankly, as a broken chain immobilizes the
bicycle I can see no logic in not carrying it.


Since I have never once had a broken chain nor seen one I cannot see
any requirement to carry such a tool.



You never had a chain suck resulting in a pretzeled or corkscrewed
chain? Then you probably haven't ridden much singletrack. Sometimes the
worst part of the "pretzeling" has to be surgically removed in the
field, upon which the chain is rather short but at least one can get
home without having to hoof it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EftEeU_qGOg

Even though I ride offroad 50% of the time it happens so rarely that I
don't see an urgency in adding a chain breaker to my on-board kit.
Besides, you need to find some rocks anyhow because the rest of the
chain usually needs straightening so it passes the derailer hanger
without an awful grinding noise every time.

A chain breaker is one of the tools easily improvised. The "McGyver
Deluxe Edition" consists of a pin (used to punch out the chain pin), a
nut or sawed off little chunk of pipe slightly larger and long enough,
and some stiff wire. The end of the wire gets fashioned into a loop that
holds the pin well. That is best done before placing it in the tool kit.
Just roll it 2-3 times around a drill bit shaft slightly smaller than
the pin. The wire can also be used to tie stuff that came off. Brake
lines and such.

Now a storm of outrage will likely break loose on this NG because this
McGyver tool ... gasp ... doesn't even have a flashing LED.

In the olden days road bike chains didn't come with missing links. The
only way to take them off was to punch out a pin. I have changed lots of
chains just using pin, nut and hammer. I don't know how I made it into
my 50's without a chain breaker but somehow I did.


... Yesterday I did 55 miles and
2500 feet of climbing with some of it pretty steep ~12%. There were
fore of us there and the dirt encrusted on the bikes showed a certain
lack of careful maintenance. No one had any problems. I have been
carrying all these tools around for the last 6 years and the only
one's I've used are the tire repair tools.


It's more for mountain bikers. I have my tools in a waist pack. That
also contains cell phone, keys, wallet, pencil and, yes, no kidding, a
small leash. That leash has helped bring some dogs home over the years.
The road bike also has a towing rope in the bottom of the left pannier.

MTB and road bike have identical panniers (Nashbar Daytrekker) and I can
simply pull the waist pack out of one bike and slide it into the other
in seconds if I decide to switch. This also avoids the worst case
scenario where you find a nice brewpub and then discover that you left
the wallet in the other bike.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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