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MTB low pressure and pinch flats



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 19th 17, 06:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,553
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 11:22:53 PM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


I guess you didn't see where I typed "rigid fork". The bike was originally built with a rigid front fork. It NEVER had suspension or telescoping front forks. BTW, there's quite a demand for those old rigid frame rigid front fork MTBs around here. I've actually had people on arail trail offer to buy the one Iwas riding from me.

I liked your Freudian slip when you said "aluminium bile" insted of bike.

Cheers
Ads
  #12  
Old May 19th 17, 07:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,627
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On 19/05/17 13:22, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


My MTB rides like a slug on a flat bitumen road, and that's with slicks.
I think the slicks are cheap and nasty with a huge Crr. I've got the
bars fairly low, but that doesn't seem to help. Also I find the wide Q
factor uncomfortable.

It has two redeeming features. Much lower gears than my road bike,
which allows me to tow a trailer up hills, and it reminds me what a joy
it is to ride my road bike again.

--
JS
  #13  
Old May 19th 17, 08:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,157
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On Thu, 18 May 2017 23:43:26 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/18/2017 11:22 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


A further aside: One friend of mine left town for employment with a
bike touring company. His job became riding with coast-to-coast or
other long distance riders on his company's tours. He was soon spending
most of his life on the bike.

When one tour came through our area, I was among those who rode out to
meet him again. He was on a very different bike than the standard road
bike he used to use. He was now on a fully suspended mountain bike
frame, but with aero 26" wheels, smooth tires, and swoopy aero road bars
with forearm or elbow resting pads. Supposedly the frame was extremely
expensive, so probably fairly light. (I don't remember the frame material.)


Thorn Cycles, Ltd., who makes what are essentially bespoke bikes,
while I wouldn't say that they recommend 26" wheels for touring
certainly do highlight their advantages.

I've ridden only one full suspension bike and that was probably for
200 meters or so, but standing while climbing was a very different
sensation then my road bikes. Basically it felt like the bile was
bending in the middle with every pedal stroke. I found it very
uncomfortable.

Interestingly Thorn also seems to be very positive about using the
Rohloff Hub for touring which was surprising after all I've read about
complex oil changes and maintenance of the hubs.


--
Cheers,

John B.

  #14  
Old May 19th 17, 08:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,157
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On Thu, 18 May 2017 22:41:04 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 11:22:53 PM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.


I guess you didn't see where I typed "rigid fork". The bike was originally built with a rigid front fork. It NEVER had suspension or telescoping front forks. BTW, there's quite a demand for those old rigid frame rigid front fork MTBs around here. I've actually had people on arail trail offer to buy the one Iwas riding from me.

I liked your Freudian slip when you said "aluminium bile" insted of bike.

Cheers


Yup. I read "rigid frame" and stopped.

But of course the original "mountain bikes" were all solid frame. Of
course they didn't refer to them as MTB's but some of their rides were
rather stimulating :-)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVWP6VaLtvw

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #15  
Old May 19th 17, 02:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,882
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 8:43:28 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/18/2017 11:22 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


A further aside: One friend of mine left town for employment with a
bike touring company. His job became riding with coast-to-coast or
other long distance riders on his company's tours. He was soon spending
most of his life on the bike.

When one tour came through our area, I was among those who rode out to
meet him again. He was on a very different bike than the standard road
bike he used to use. He was now on a fully suspended mountain bike
frame, but with aero 26" wheels, smooth tires, and swoopy aero road bars
with forearm or elbow resting pads. Supposedly the frame was extremely
expensive, so probably fairly light. (I don't remember the frame material.)


My mileage is really low this year and so rides that were difficult are killer now. I was riding what is normally a fairly hard section - 9%-10% and I just couldn't make it to the top without stopping about 100 yards short. Some woman rode past on one of those fat wheel bikes. She was standing up and pumping.

My heart rate was nearly back to normal so I started again and she hadn't made it to the top either. I past her and shortly after she passed me again. And it was a (&(())& electric bike. So they won't climb without a lot of assistance.
  #16  
Old May 19th 17, 02:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,882
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On Friday, May 19, 2017 at 12:07:11 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 23:43:26 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/18/2017 11:22 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers

I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


A further aside: One friend of mine left town for employment with a
bike touring company. His job became riding with coast-to-coast or
other long distance riders on his company's tours. He was soon spending
most of his life on the bike.

When one tour came through our area, I was among those who rode out to
meet him again. He was on a very different bike than the standard road
bike he used to use. He was now on a fully suspended mountain bike
frame, but with aero 26" wheels, smooth tires, and swoopy aero road bars
with forearm or elbow resting pads. Supposedly the frame was extremely
expensive, so probably fairly light. (I don't remember the frame material.)


Thorn Cycles, Ltd., who makes what are essentially bespoke bikes,
while I wouldn't say that they recommend 26" wheels for touring
certainly do highlight their advantages.

I've ridden only one full suspension bike and that was probably for
200 meters or so, but standing while climbing was a very different
sensation then my road bikes. Basically it felt like the bile was
bending in the middle with every pedal stroke. I found it very
uncomfortable.

Interestingly Thorn also seems to be very positive about using the
Rohloff Hub for touring which was surprising after all I've read about
complex oil changes and maintenance of the hubs.


When you're on a real steep off-road climb you sit. The front end is so heavy that you can't lift them off of the ground with a low gear so you don't have to stand.
  #17  
Old May 19th 17, 03:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 935
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

John B. writes:

On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people, enough for them to
pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year old record and
Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar attempts over the
years. It looks like yet another example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike. I removed
the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork and added drop
bars as I find them more comfortable. The most noticeable difference
is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a
road bile with 23mm tires.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop bar
and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes and tires
for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads with big
cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers


I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork to
solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a "MTB"
:-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and still
weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


Let's hear it for utility bile. I'm fed up to here with all this
boutique, high end, poseur bile.
--
  #18  
Old May 19th 17, 03:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,292
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On 2017-05-19 06:30, wrote:
On Friday, May 19, 2017 at 12:07:11 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 23:43:26 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/18/2017 11:22 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B.
wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people,
enough for them to pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year
old record and Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system



Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar
attempts over the years. It looks like yet another
example of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility
bike. I removed the front forks and replaced them with a
solid fork and added drop bars as I find them more
comfortable. The most noticeable difference is that the 1.5
inch tires don't seem to lose pressure as quickly as a road
bile with 23mm tires. -- Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to
drop bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring
bikes and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads
with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers

I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork
to solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called
a "MTB" :-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks,
and still weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)

A further aside: One friend of mine left town for employment
with a bike touring company. His job became riding with
coast-to-coast or other long distance riders on his company's
tours. He was soon spending most of his life on the bike.

When one tour came through our area, I was among those who rode
out to meet him again. He was on a very different bike than the
standard road bike he used to use. He was now on a fully
suspended mountain bike frame, but with aero 26" wheels, smooth
tires, and swoopy aero road bars with forearm or elbow resting
pads. Supposedly the frame was extremely expensive, so probably
fairly light. (I don't remember the frame material.)


Thorn Cycles, Ltd., who makes what are essentially bespoke bikes,
while I wouldn't say that they recommend 26" wheels for touring
certainly do highlight their advantages.

I've ridden only one full suspension bike and that was probably
for 200 meters or so, but standing while climbing was a very
different sensation then my road bikes. Basically it felt like the
bile was bending in the middle with every pedal stroke. I found it
very uncomfortable.

Interestingly Thorn also seems to be very positive about using the
Rohloff Hub for touring which was surprising after all I've read
about complex oil changes and maintenance of the hubs.


When you're on a real steep off-road climb you sit. The front end is
so heavy that you can't lift them off of the ground with a low gear
so you don't have to stand.


Not really. The front coming off the ground is a common occurrence on a
MTB. There are climbs where I have to not just stand but also bend my
upper body over the handlebar so this does not happen.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old May 19th 17, 03:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,292
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On 2017-05-19 06:27, wrote:
On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 8:43:28 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 5/18/2017 11:22 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 10:02:20 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:14:41 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 May 2017 12:13:05 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 5/17/2017 2:36 AM, James wrote:
I thought this might be interesting to some people,
enough for them to pass comment.

Perhaps not, or it got lost in the noise about 14 year
old record and Shimano Headsets?

On 15/05/17 13:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system



Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.

It didn't seem different enough from a dozen similar
attempts over the years. It looks like yet another example
of bicycle-related re-invention.

Plus I rarely ride the mountain bike these days.

I've got a mountain bike frame that I use as a utility bike.
I removed the front forks and replaced them with a solid fork
and added drop bars as I find them more comfortable. The most
noticeable difference is that the 1.5 inch tires don't seem
to lose pressure as quickly as a road bile with 23mm tires.
-- Cheers,

John B.

I've converted a number of older rigid frame/forks MTB to drop
bar and bar end shifteres. They make fantastic touring bikes
and tires for them can be bought almost anywhere.

A lot of people like them for riding on dirt roads or roads
with big cracks and potholed pavement.

With brifters a drop bar MTB is the cat's meow.

Cheers

I wonder, after you changed the original telescoping front fork
to solid and add drop bars and brifters, can it still be called a
"MTB" :-?

An aside. The utility bile is all aluminum, frame and forks, and
still weighs more then my all steel road bike :-)


A further aside: One friend of mine left town for employment with
a bike touring company. His job became riding with coast-to-coast
or other long distance riders on his company's tours. He was soon
spending most of his life on the bike.

When one tour came through our area, I was among those who rode out
to meet him again. He was on a very different bike than the
standard road bike he used to use. He was now on a fully suspended
mountain bike frame, but with aero 26" wheels, smooth tires, and
swoopy aero road bars with forearm or elbow resting pads.
Supposedly the frame was extremely expensive, so probably fairly
light. (I don't remember the frame material.)


My mileage is really low this year and so rides that were difficult
are killer now. I was riding what is normally a fairly hard section -
9%-10% and I just couldn't make it to the top without stopping about
100 yards short. Some woman rode past on one of those fat wheel
bikes. She was standing up and pumping.

My heart rate was nearly back to normal so I started again and she
hadn't made it to the top either. I past her and shortly after she
passed me again. And it was a (&(())& electric bike. So they won't
climb without a lot of assistance.


That bugs me sometimes. A few weeks ago I was mashing up a hill and I
have beefy leg muscles. Whoosh ... a young girl on a MTB passed me. When
she was in front I could hear the whirring of the hub motor.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #20  
Old May 19th 17, 04:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,292
Default MTB low pressure and pinch flats

On 2017-05-14 20:19, James wrote:
http://www.mtbiking.com.au/news/banger-anti-flat-system

Looks like the black foam lagging a plumber might use when installing
hot water pipes.


I have tried a lot of stuff and IMO the only method to avoid flats on
the MTB is a sturdy tire, tire liner with a old tube slid over it plus a
tube with 0.160" or 4mm wall thickness, and running at nearly max
allowed pressure (I run them 50psi). All of that. No flats in years and
I ride hard. I had the occasional hard blow-out but that's got nothing
to do with punctures. That is when a tire fails in a more spectacular
way with pieces of it flying off. Happens maybe once a year so not bad,
and usually after I hit something the wrong way.

With that setup I can bomb down rocky sections like I did yesterday and
not worry about becoming stranded with an unfixable gash in the tire.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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