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"Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 19th 04, 12:47 PM
James Annan
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

It's now a year since the QR/disk brake problem hit the headlines, and I
thought some of you might be interested in hearing how the manufacturers
are dealing with it.

A few weeks ago, yet another rider who had just upgraded to disk brakes
found that he couldn't reliably keep his wheel stationary in the
dropouts under heavy braking. So far, so normal. Having found my web
page, he then did what it seems no mountain biker before him has
bothered to do, and asked the manufacturers for advice. In all, he spoke
to Answer (Manitou), Fox Racing, and also Avid and Chris King.

The clever ones will already have worked out where the subject line came
from. Yes, to a man (actually, 3 men and one woman), they all insisted
that he was the first person to have ever brought this up with them, and
no, they had no plans to do anything about it, because no-one else ever
had this problem. One of them (Avid) did say that it was obviously
dangerous and he should not ride the bike in that state, but had no
useful suggestion as to what he could do to make it safe.

So there you have it. At this rate, by the time next year's complaint
comes in, they will presumably have forgotten this first one. How
convenient for them. Those who thought that it wouldn't do to kick up a
fuss because the poor manufacturers were doing their best, may wish to
re-examine their approach. Or else studiously ignore this post in the
vain hope that the problem will go away.

James

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  #2  
Old March 19th 04, 01:10 PM
\(t'other\) Dave
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"


"James Annan" wrote in message
...
It's now a year since the QR/disk brake problem hit the headlines, and I
thought some of you might be interested in hearing how the manufacturers
are dealing with it.

A few weeks ago, yet another rider who had just upgraded to disk brakes
found that he couldn't reliably keep his wheel stationary in the
dropouts under heavy braking. So far, so normal. Having found my web
page, he then did what it seems no mountain biker before him has
bothered to do, and asked the manufacturers for advice. In all, he spoke
to Answer (Manitou), Fox Racing, and also Avid and Chris King.

The clever ones will already have worked out where the subject line came
from. Yes, to a man (actually, 3 men and one woman), they all insisted
that he was the first person to have ever brought this up with them, and
no, they had no plans to do anything about it, because no-one else ever
had this problem. One of them (Avid) did say that it was obviously
dangerous and he should not ride the bike in that state, but had no
useful suggestion as to what he could do to make it safe.

So there you have it. At this rate, by the time next year's complaint
comes in, they will presumably have forgotten this first one. How
convenient for them. Those who thought that it wouldn't do to kick up a
fuss because the poor manufacturers were doing their best, may wish to
re-examine their approach. Or else studiously ignore this post in the
vain hope that the problem will go away.

James


....or come back to rim brakes ;-)


  #3  
Old March 19th 04, 02:00 PM
Nelson Binch
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Posts: n/a
Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

Cross posts I don't participate in removed.

"James Annan" wrote in message
...
It's now a year since the QR/disk brake problem hit the headlines, and I
thought some of you might be interested in hearing how the manufacturers
are dealing with it.

A few weeks ago, yet another rider who had just upgraded to disk brakes
found that he couldn't reliably keep his wheel stationary in the
dropouts under heavy braking. So far, so normal. Having found my web
page, he then did what it seems no mountain biker before him has
bothered to do, and asked the manufacturers for advice. In all, he spoke
to Answer (Manitou), Fox Racing, and also Avid and Chris King.

The clever ones will already have worked out where the subject line came
from. Yes, to a man (actually, 3 men and one woman), they all insisted
that he was the first person to have ever brought this up with them, and
no, they had no plans to do anything about it, because no-one else ever
had this problem. One of them (Avid) did say that it was obviously
dangerous and he should not ride the bike in that state, but had no
useful suggestion as to what he could do to make it safe.

So there you have it. At this rate, by the time next year's complaint
comes in, they will presumably have forgotten this first one. How
convenient for them. Those who thought that it wouldn't do to kick up a
fuss because the poor manufacturers were doing their best, may wish to
re-examine their approach. Or else studiously ignore this post in the
vain hope that the problem will go away.

James


Wow! How many people are having this problem? Out of how many disk users?

Sorry, but every single time I've seen pictures of these 'incidents' it
looks like improperly set skewers to me.


---
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http://intbike.com
704 535-5501

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  #4  
Old March 19th 04, 02:24 PM
Shaun Rimmer
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Posts: n/a
Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"


"(t'other) Dave" wrote in message
...

"James Annan" wrote in message
...
It's now a year since the QR/disk brake problem hit the headlines, and I
thought some of you might be interested in hearing how the manufacturers
are dealing with it.

A few weeks ago, yet another rider who had just upgraded to disk brakes
found that he couldn't reliably keep his wheel stationary in the
dropouts under heavy braking. So far, so normal. Having found my web
page, he then did what it seems no mountain biker before him has
bothered to do, and asked the manufacturers for advice. In all, he spoke
to Answer (Manitou), Fox Racing, and also Avid and Chris King.

The clever ones will already have worked out where the subject line came
from. Yes, to a man (actually, 3 men and one woman), they all insisted
that he was the first person to have ever brought this up with them, and
no, they had no plans to do anything about it, because no-one else ever
had this problem. One of them (Avid) did say that it was obviously
dangerous and he should not ride the bike in that state, but had no
useful suggestion as to what he could do to make it safe.

So there you have it. At this rate, by the time next year's complaint
comes in, they will presumably have forgotten this first one. How
convenient for them. Those who thought that it wouldn't do to kick up a
fuss because the poor manufacturers were doing their best, may wish to
re-examine their approach. Or else studiously ignore this post in the
vain hope that the problem will go away.

James


...or come back to rim brakes ;-)


Infidel! Heretic! Hiccup!



Shaun aRe



  #5  
Old March 19th 04, 02:47 PM
Merlin
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Posts: n/a
Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

Wow! How many people are having this problem? Out of how many disk
users?

Sorry, but every single time I've seen pictures of these 'incidents' it
looks like improperly set skewers to me.


misuse is the most common cause of product malfunction.

~Travis


  #6  
Old March 19th 04, 02:50 PM
Peter B
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"


"James Annan" wrote in message
...
It's now a year since the QR/disk brake problem hit the headlines, and I
thought some of you might be interested in hearing how the manufacturers
are dealing with it.


Well I've not had a problem yet but I do make sure the standard Shimano
skewers are very tight.
Also I've noticed the "Lawyer Lips" on my new Rockshox seem particularly
generous, I don't know if that's just a fluke or deliberate to help address
the (alleged) problem.
--
Regards,
Pete


  #7  
Old March 19th 04, 03:07 PM
Carla A-G
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

"Peter B" wrote in message
...
Well I've not had a problem yet but I do make sure the standard Shimano
skewers are very tight.


We use thru-axles and pinch bolts on a majority of our bikes. It solves the
problem on having to worry if the QR is tight enough or not.

- CA-G

Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!


  #8  
Old March 19th 04, 03:14 PM
bomba
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

On Fri, 19 Mar 2004 14:50:19 +0000, Peter B wrote:

Well I've not had a problem yet but I do make sure the standard Shimano
skewers are very tight.


Is there such a thing as too tight? Is there a danger of the skewer
being over-stressed and being more likely to fail?

--
a.m-b FAQ: http://www.j-harris.net/bike/ambfaq.htm

a.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm

  #9  
Old March 19th 04, 03:26 PM
Pete Jones
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

On Fri, 19 Mar 2004 16:14:30 +0100, bomba
blathered:

Well I've not had a problem yet but I do make sure the standard Shimano
skewers are very tight.


Is there such a thing as too tight? Is there a danger of the skewer
being over-stressed and being more likely to fail?


I'm sure James will be along shortly to tell us.

Pete
  #10  
Old March 19th 04, 03:31 PM
Jon Senior
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Default "Actually you are the first person to bring up this issue"

"bomba" wrote in message
news
On Fri, 19 Mar 2004 14:50:19 +0000, Peter B wrote:

Well I've not had a problem yet but I do make sure the standard Shimano
skewers are very tight.


Is there such a thing as too tight? Is there a danger of the skewer
being over-stressed and being more likely to fail?


With quick-release, if you have the skewers too tight, they can make the hub
bearings bind. Giant's bike manual suggested that the levers were too loose
if closing them didn't leave an imprint in my palm. Doing so meant the
wheels stopped rotating within about 3/4 revolution, compared to around 20
when loose.

Jon


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