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HP Velotechnik Street Machine?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 3rd 06, 10:02 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
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Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


How does this look, folks?

It's got full suspension and disc brakes! Only wish the seat was mesh,
for air flow, and that it was much lighter than 36 lbs.

http://www.bicycleman.com/recumbents...et_machine.htm

Y'all know of anything else like this, but better?

The Street Machine is ~$3K...that's my budget.


TIA!

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  #2  
Old January 4th 06, 03:21 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
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Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


NYC XYZ wrote:
How does this look, folks?

It's got full suspension and disc brakes! Only wish the seat was mesh,
for air flow, and that it was much lighter than 36 lbs.

http://www.bicycleman.com/recumbents...et_machine.htm

Y'all know of anything else like this, but better?

The Street Machine is ~$3K...that's my budget.


Peter Clinch, Medical Physics IT Officer at University of Dundee,
Ninewells Hospital, Dundee Scotland, UK has posted to
alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent in the past about his HP Velotechnik
Streetmachine GT and former alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent regular John
Harper had much to say about his Nils Palm Wind, which was a clone of
the original Streetmachine. This information should provide the
appropriate search parameters for Google Groups.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley

  #3  
Old January 4th 06, 04:17 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
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Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


"Johnny Sunset" wrote in message
oups.com...
[...]

Peter Clinch, Medical Physics IT Officer at University of Dundee,
Ninewells Hospital, Dundee Scotland, UK has posted to
alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent in the past about his HP Velotechnik
Streetmachine GT and former alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent regular John
Harper had much to say about his Nils Palm Wind, which was a clone of
the original Streetmachine. This information should provide the
appropriate search parameters for Google Groups.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley


Why Peter Clinch won't tell me what a Medical Physics IT Officer is boggles
my mind. I of course am too proud to ever look any of this up. I wonder, is
he too proud also to tell me what it is?

It has been suggested by some that this is nothing but a fancy designation
for a janitor. Damn, what is wrong with the word 'janitor'. I just hate
these euphemisms and high sounding titles that make no sense whatever. Why
not call a spade a spade?

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota

PS. I wonder why you don't follow my lead when referring to ARBR. It is much
easier to type ARBR than to type alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent. I think you are
the only one here who does that.



  #4  
Old January 4th 06, 10:04 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
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Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?

NYC XYZ wrote:
How does this look, folks?

It's got full suspension and disc brakes! Only wish the seat was
mesh, for air flow, and that it was much lighter than 36 lbs.

http://www.bicycleman.com/recumbents...et_machine.htm

Y'all know of anything else like this, but better?

The Street Machine is ~$3K...that's my budget.


If Pete Clinch is still reading, he'll no doubt give you the benefit of
several years of ownership and touring.

However, consensus from reports, and my own rides on loaned examples:
Excellent Touring machine, good for long trips, loaded with luggage, etc.
Not a sports machine, and won't win any races. Not the lightest bike on the
planet. Cell-foam seat better than you might think. Has competitors from
various other European makers (eg. Challenge might be the best known).

You may want to see if the newer "bodylink" seat shell is available on a new
machine. That is used on the Grasshopper model, and I think was being moved
across the whole range.

The choice of components does alter the way it rides; I've had a go on
different examples with different front suspension, gearing and braking
systems (disk vs V-brake, fancy springs vs. basic, derrailleur vs rohloff).
My preference was for the simpler and cheaper options; in all cases the
springs seem to need tuning to the rider's weight and preferences.


As with any machine at that sort of price, get a decent test ride. And
within HP-V's range, look also at the Grasshopper (twin 20in wheels) and the
Speedmachine (a bit more reclined, but still touring capable). The Street
Machine now comes with either Aluminum or Steel frame in Europe; you might
want to enquire which is better for your intended use.


- Nigel


--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/


  #5  
Old January 4th 06, 11:08 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
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Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?

Nigel Cliffe wrote:
NYC XYZ wrote:


How does this look, folks?

It's got full suspension and disc brakes!


It only has discs if you specify them as optional extras. As standard
it comes with Tektro V brakes, which are okay but nothing special. I
upgraded the Vs to Magura HS 33 hydraulic rim brakes, which are also a
standard factory option and will weigh in at less than discs, and also
allow the lighter fork option without the disc mount.

The suspension is superb. I thought it was a bit pointless on a road
machine at first, but it's done very well and makes a big difference to
comfort and efficiency on poorer surfaces, especially fully loaded as
the luggage travels suspended too.

Only wish the seat was
mesh, for air flow, and that it was much lighter than 36 lbs.


I graduated to it from a mesh seat machine, and frankly prefer the hard
shell. The ventilation isn't so good, granted, but the support is
better (especially at more reclined angles) and it makes pushing against
the seat more effective IMHO.

It /is/ heavy, but having said that all the things that make it heavy
are doing a useful job (at least useful in the context of serious
touring, which the bike is designed for). Note that the latest version,
the GTe, has an alloy frame and is consequently a bit lighter

Y'all know of anything else like this, but better?


For what it does and what I want, not much. Now HPVel have introduced a
version of the Speedmachine with USS that will take 4 panniers I might
look at that as an alternative if I was replacing mine after some
disaster, but I've never really been left thinking I should have bought
something else.

However, consensus from reports, and my own rides on loaned examples:
Excellent Touring machine, good for long trips, loaded with luggage, etc.
Not a sports machine, and won't win any races. Not the lightest bike on the
planet. Cell-foam seat better than you might think.


Pretty much on the money there, I'd say. Though I wouldn't mind
something hot as an extra machine rather than an alternative, the SMGT
is the most refined bike I've ever ridden and that more than makes up
for the relatively sluggish performance for me. And while not great on
the flat or climbing, the gears go low enough that you can still get the
climbing done, and back down the other side the suspension adds quite a
bit to the road holding so if it's a less than perfect road you can
easily pass most bikes going down the other side.

Has competitors from
various other European makers (eg. Challenge might be the best known).


And Optima and M5 from the Dutch "Big 3", and numerous others. You can
save money by going this way but I don't think their suspension is quite
so thoroughly sorted.

You may want to see if the newer "bodylink" seat shell is available on a new
machine. That is used on the Grasshopper model, and I think was being moved
across the whole range.


The GTe has a Bodylink as standard, the chromoly framed GT still uses
the individually sized seats. Though the Bodylink has all sorts of
adjustments I could never get the one I tried quite as good /for me/ as
the seat on my Streetmachine...

The choice of components does alter the way it rides; I've had a go on
different examples with different front suspension, gearing and braking
systems (disk vs V-brake, fancy springs vs. basic, derrailleur vs rohloff).
My preference was for the simpler and cheaper options; in all cases the
springs seem to need tuning to the rider's weight and preferences.


I would certainly go for the hydraulic rim brakes over the Vs: they work
/considerably/ better, and if you're doing 30+ mph with full touring
luggage that's a Good Thing. Aside from ordering the spring unit that
matched my basic weight I've never bothered fiddling with the suspension
at all, aside from greasing the bushes at the back once a year, and it
doesn't seem to have been anything other than superb.

As with any machine at that sort of price, get a decent test ride.


Absolutely. Recumbents vary a lot in the flesh and what looks perfect
on paper can just not ring the bells when you're on it. And what looks
wrong on paper or at first glance can actually be Just Right when you
get on and try it out. Roos' Nazca Fiero fits that latter category

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

  #6  
Old January 4th 06, 04:40 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


Thanks again for the info (and to everyone else as well!).

Can you tell me what you think the difference is between the Street
Machine GTe and the Speed Machine?

I mean, sure one's supposed to be built for speed -- though the company
website's photos show it being used just like any other tourer -- and
so it's got an even lower profile...which means it probably can't take
that under-seat rack...but other than that and the price, it seems the
same as a GTe, no? I mean, is it just better components?

For the ~$300 difference in price, I think I might even wind up with a
Speed Machine after all if it really is faster! My main concern WRT
speed is really hill-climbing. I love to climb them much as the next
cyclist, but it's nice feeling that your efforts aren't compromised by
a hog of a machine underneath! =)



Peter Clinch wrote:
Nigel Cliffe wrote:
NYC XYZ wrote:


How does this look, folks?

It's got full suspension and disc brakes!


It only has discs if you specify them as optional extras. As standard
it comes with Tektro V brakes, which are okay but nothing special. I
upgraded the Vs to Magura HS 33 hydraulic rim brakes, which are also a
standard factory option and will weigh in at less than discs, and also
allow the lighter fork option without the disc mount.

The suspension is superb. I thought it was a bit pointless on a road
machine at first, but it's done very well and makes a big difference to
comfort and efficiency on poorer surfaces, especially fully loaded as
the luggage travels suspended too.

Only wish the seat was
mesh, for air flow, and that it was much lighter than 36 lbs.


I graduated to it from a mesh seat machine, and frankly prefer the hard
shell. The ventilation isn't so good, granted, but the support is
better (especially at more reclined angles) and it makes pushing against
the seat more effective IMHO.

It /is/ heavy, but having said that all the things that make it heavy
are doing a useful job (at least useful in the context of serious
touring, which the bike is designed for). Note that the latest version,
the GTe, has an alloy frame and is consequently a bit lighter

Y'all know of anything else like this, but better?


For what it does and what I want, not much. Now HPVel have introduced a
version of the Speedmachine with USS that will take 4 panniers I might
look at that as an alternative if I was replacing mine after some
disaster, but I've never really been left thinking I should have bought
something else.

However, consensus from reports, and my own rides on loaned examples:
Excellent Touring machine, good for long trips, loaded with luggage, etc.
Not a sports machine, and won't win any races. Not the lightest bike on the
planet. Cell-foam seat better than you might think.


Pretty much on the money there, I'd say. Though I wouldn't mind
something hot as an extra machine rather than an alternative, the SMGT
is the most refined bike I've ever ridden and that more than makes up
for the relatively sluggish performance for me. And while not great on
the flat or climbing, the gears go low enough that you can still get the
climbing done, and back down the other side the suspension adds quite a
bit to the road holding so if it's a less than perfect road you can
easily pass most bikes going down the other side.

Has competitors from
various other European makers (eg. Challenge might be the best known).


And Optima and M5 from the Dutch "Big 3", and numerous others. You can
save money by going this way but I don't think their suspension is quite
so thoroughly sorted.

You may want to see if the newer "bodylink" seat shell is available on a new
machine. That is used on the Grasshopper model, and I think was being moved
across the whole range.


The GTe has a Bodylink as standard, the chromoly framed GT still uses
the individually sized seats. Though the Bodylink has all sorts of
adjustments I could never get the one I tried quite as good /for me/ as
the seat on my Streetmachine...

The choice of components does alter the way it rides; I've had a go on
different examples with different front suspension, gearing and braking
systems (disk vs V-brake, fancy springs vs. basic, derrailleur vs rohloff).
My preference was for the simpler and cheaper options; in all cases the
springs seem to need tuning to the rider's weight and preferences.


I would certainly go for the hydraulic rim brakes over the Vs: they work
/considerably/ better, and if you're doing 30+ mph with full touring
luggage that's a Good Thing. Aside from ordering the spring unit that
matched my basic weight I've never bothered fiddling with the suspension
at all, aside from greasing the bushes at the back once a year, and it
doesn't seem to have been anything other than superb.

As with any machine at that sort of price, get a decent test ride.


Absolutely. Recumbents vary a lot in the flesh and what looks perfect
on paper can just not ring the bells when you're on it. And what looks
wrong on paper or at first glance can actually be Just Right when you
get on and try it out. Roos' Nazca Fiero fits that latter category

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/


  #7  
Old January 4th 06, 07:19 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?

NYC XYZ wrote:
Thanks again for the info (and to everyone else as well!).

Can you tell me what you think the difference is between the Street
Machine GTe and the Speed Machine?


Different geometry = different seating position = different comfort
depending on your body and personal preferences.

Speed-M geometry comes from a "mostly racing / fast day rides" machine. Its
a little bit low and feet in the air (though not extreme). Its a bit harder
to look over ones shoulder due to the rider's neck being more horizontal
than vertical. Therefore, I think some form of mirror would be essential
(which requires some thought on fitting to an USS version of the machine,
unless you go for helmet or spectacle mounted options).

Street-M geometry comes from a touring machine, and the rider sits a little
more upright with feet a bit lower, though still fully recumbent (rather
than Bike-E "half recumbent"). Shoulder observations are a bit easier as
its more upright.

The seat angles overlap; Speed-M is 25 to 35 degrees. Street-M is 30 to 40
degrees.

The bottom bracket on the Speed-M is MUCH higher than the Street-M when
referenced from the rider's seat (160mm or 6.5inches difference). I think
this accounts for most of teh difference in rider position and perceptions
as to which is more comfortable, rather than the recline angles.
This might be an issue for you; its a bit harder to swing ones leg up the
extra distance, and if you suffer cold feet or pins&needles from having your
feet working up high, it would probably be worse on the Speed-M.


There isn't much weight difference when riding a Speed-M and a steel
Street-M. I expect the USS option on the Speed-M will bring the weights of
the two machines to near enough identical kerb-weights.





Which you'd prefer comes down to test rides. They are very different riding
experiences.

If making a comparison on speed, use a stop-watch or other measuring device.
For most people, the Speed-M will feel a bit faster at a given constant
speed because your eyes are nearer the tarmac.


- Nigel



--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/


  #8  
Old January 4th 06, 09:56 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


Great points! So it's decided, then...I'll see you out there -- in my
GTe!

Ouch...$3K...I'd just spent $3K this past month...!



Nigel Cliffe wrote:


Different geometry = different seating position = different comfort
depending on your body and personal preferences.

Speed-M geometry comes from a "mostly racing / fast day rides" machine. Its
a little bit low and feet in the air (though not extreme). Its a bit harder
to look over ones shoulder due to the rider's neck being more horizontal
than vertical. Therefore, I think some form of mirror would be essential
(which requires some thought on fitting to an USS version of the machine,
unless you go for helmet or spectacle mounted options).

Street-M geometry comes from a touring machine, and the rider sits a little
more upright with feet a bit lower, though still fully recumbent (rather
than Bike-E "half recumbent"). Shoulder observations are a bit easier as
its more upright.

The seat angles overlap; Speed-M is 25 to 35 degrees. Street-M is 30 to 40
degrees.

The bottom bracket on the Speed-M is MUCH higher than the Street-M when
referenced from the rider's seat (160mm or 6.5inches difference). I think
this accounts for most of teh difference in rider position and perceptions
as to which is more comfortable, rather than the recline angles.
This might be an issue for you; its a bit harder to swing ones leg up the
extra distance, and if you suffer cold feet or pins&needles from having your
feet working up high, it would probably be worse on the Speed-M.


There isn't much weight difference when riding a Speed-M and a steel
Street-M. I expect the USS option on the Speed-M will bring the weights of
the two machines to near enough identical kerb-weights.





Which you'd prefer comes down to test rides. They are very different riding
experiences.

If making a comparison on speed, use a stop-watch or other measuring device.
For most people, the Speed-M will feel a bit faster at a given constant
speed because your eyes are nearer the tarmac.


- Nigel



--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/


  #9  
Old January 5th 06, 12:27 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


"NYC XYZ" wrote in message
ups.com...

Great points! So it's decided, then...I'll see you out there -- in my
GTe!

Ouch...$3K...I'd just spent $3K this past month...!

much prunage

Check out www.recumbents.com there's a '03 Speedmachine with a tailfairing
for bout $2500. I have an older one too. It's a sweet ride, even if I can't
make it go all that fast. Some people say they have trouble starting up and
steering Sm's with the hampster bars. I bought mine used and never had a
test ride. I saw one once and I wanted it, but couldn't afford it.
Eventually I had some cash, the I gotta have it itch and the opportunity. It
came with the aero bars and I never had a problem steering (Don't put the
brakes on in a slow speed turn! Never, ever!) I think that it's more stable
than my SWB RANS. I upgraded to new air shock, new Magura Louise calipers
and a seat that's the right size. It's red. It's a really sweet ride.

fat old geezer onna bent



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  #10  
Old January 5th 06, 01:00 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default HP Velotechnik Street Machine?


gotbent, a self-described fat old geezer onna bent, wrote:
"NYC XYZ" wrote in message
ups.com...

Great points! So it's decided, then...I'll see you out there -- in my
GTe!

Ouch...$3K...I'd just spent $3K this past month...!

much prunage

Check out www.recumbents.com there's a '03 Speedmachine with a tailfairing
for bout $2500. I have an older one too. It's a sweet ride, even if I can't
make it go all that fast. Some people say they have trouble starting up and
steering Sm's with the hampster bars. I bought mine used and never had a
test ride. I saw one once and I wanted it, but couldn't afford it.
Eventually I had some cash, the I gotta have it itch and the opportunity. It
came with the aero bars and I never had a problem steering (Don't put the
brakes on in a slow speed turn! Never, ever!) I think that it's more stable
than my SWB RANS. I upgraded to new air shock, new Magura Louise calipers
and a seat that's the right size. It's red. It's a really sweet ride.


I had no trouble riding a HP Velotechnik Speedmachine with the "T" bars
even though the seat was about 5 cm too far back. I would get the "T"
bars since they look so much better (opinion).

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley

 




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