A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Recumbent Biking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Questions about recumbent trikes



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 7th 06, 04:42 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
sfb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

#1 Are there names for the 1 wheel forward 2 back and 2 forward 1 back
configurations?

#1 What are the advantages and disadvantages of the two configurations?

Thanks


Ads
  #2  
Old September 7th 06, 06:18 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Roger Houston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Questions about recumbent trikes


"sfb" wrote in message
. ..
#1 Are there names for the 1 wheel forward 2 back and 2 forward 1 back
configurations?


Delta and tadpole respectively, IIRC

#1 What are the advantages and disadvantages of the two configurations?


There are tradeoffs in the complexity of drive and steering. There probably
are other differences as well. I hope this thread doesn't get hijacked and
that more knowledgeable people contribute to it.



  #3  
Old September 8th 06, 12:35 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
DougC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,276
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

Roger Houston wrote:
"sfb" wrote in message
. ..
#1 Are there names for the 1 wheel forward 2 back and 2 forward 1 back
configurations?


Delta and tadpole respectively, IIRC

#1 What are the advantages and disadvantages of the two configurations?


There are tradeoffs in the complexity of drive and steering. There probably
are other differences as well. I hope this thread doesn't get hijacked and
that more knowledgeable people contribute to it.



Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.

The deltas tend to be heavier, but have two advantages: one is that they
are easier for people with limited-mobility to get on and off of. The
other is that two or more deltas can be strung-together in a sort-of
tandem if the wheel from one is removed, and then the fork of it is
hooked onto the back of the other (some delta trikes have a bracket
already for this use, but if not, making one is not hardly impossible).
~~~~~
  #4  
Old September 8th 06, 01:05 AM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Jeff Grippe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 277
Default Questions about recumbent trikes


"DougC" wrote in message
...
Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.

The deltas tend to be heavier, but have two advantages: one is that they
are easier for people with limited-mobility to get on and off of. The
other is that two or more deltas can be strung-together in a sort-of
tandem if the wheel from one is removed, and then the fork of it is hooked
onto the back of the other (some delta trikes have a bracket already for
this use, but if not, making one is not hardly impossible).


There are exceptions. My Tricruiser, a Tadpole, was very easy to get on and
off because the seat was quite high off the ground. It was so high that when
I pulled up alongside of cars, I could look eye-level with the drivers.

The very first trike I owned was a Sun Delta. There were two things I really
didn't like about it. One was that it had power to only one side. The other
was that the widest part of the trike was behind you so it was more
difficult to judge what you would fit through. I think if the first problem
were taken care of, however, I could like with the second.

I understand that Hase has a recent model that supplies power to both wheels
instead of just one. I imagine that I'd do just fine with that.

Now I'm looking for a trike that can use both hand and foot power. The only
one I know of is a Tadpole.



  #5  
Old September 8th 06, 07:18 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Typhoon Longwang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

DougC wrote:
Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.


This is true, IMO. In my experience, tadpoles are much more stable when
cornering at speed. I have no problems taking certain sweeping turns
around here on my tadpole at 30 mph, but I'd have to change my shorts
(probably after I got out of the hospital) if I tried the same thing on
most deltas.

TL

--

Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist
the black flag, and begin slitting throats.

H.L. Mencken
  #6  
Old September 8th 06, 11:58 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Johnny Sunset aka Tom Sherman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,130
Default Questions about recumbent trikes


Typhoon Longwang wrote:
DougC wrote:
Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.


This is true, IMO. In my experience, tadpoles are much more stable when
cornering at speed. I have no problems taking certain sweeping turns
around here on my tadpole at 30 mph, but I'd have to change my shorts
(probably after I got out of the hospital) if I tried the same thing on
most deltas.


For odd cornering, see:
http://www.jggrafx.com/thomsstuff/thebis1.jpg.

On the RWD/RWS Thebis, you feel the rear end swing to the side before
much change in direction occurs. The high center of gravity makes it
fairly easy to flip in tight turn [1]. I have not ridden a Thebis
anywhere but a parking lot, but I would be VERY hesitant to go fast
downhill.

[1] Based on observations of someone else tipping a Thebis over while
cornering.

--
Tom Sherman - Behind the Cheddar Curtain
Blue Earth Cycles Dragonflyer

  #7  
Old September 9th 06, 06:31 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Carol Hague
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 67
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

Typhoon Longwang wrote:

DougC wrote:
Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.


This is true, IMO. In my experience, tadpoles are much more stable when
cornering at speed. I have no problems taking certain sweeping turns
around here on my tadpole at 30 mph, but I'd have to change my shorts
(probably after I got out of the hospital) if I tried the same thing on
most deltas.


The reason for that is that the failure mode (i.e. when it's most likely
to tip over) of a delta is cornering downhill at speed, whereas the
failure mode of a tadpole is cornering *uphill* at speed, which, for
most of us is a fair bit less likely :-)

--
Carol
"I can't stress this enough. Edible ball bearings. Masterpiece."
- The Doctor
  #8  
Old September 9th 06, 06:31 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Carol Hague
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 67
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

Jeff Grippe wrote:

Now I'm looking for a trike that can use both hand and foot power. The only
one I know of is a Tadpole.


Greenspeed used to make one, but don't any longer. I don't think they
sold very many, so the chances of getting a second -hand one are pretty
slim.

I guess the one you know of would be the Angletech Quadra-Ped ?

http://www.angletechcycles.com/bikes/trikes/index.htm

--
Carol
"I can't stress this enough. Edible ball bearings. Masterpiece."
- The Doctor
  #9  
Old September 9th 06, 09:13 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Simon Kellett
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Questions about recumbent trikes

DougC writes:

Roger Houston wrote:

Speaking for US-oriented examples--
The tadpoles tend to be lighter overall and more performance-oriented.

The deltas tend to be heavier,


The exception (but it may not be Big in the US) is the Hase Kettwiesel:
a fast, light delta, although it can be a little light at the front !!

You may also find that a delta trike has a smaller turning circle, which
is useful in town (the Kett can nearly turn around its' rear wheels).

--
Simon Kellett, Darmstadt, Germany | http://home.arcor.de/zoxed
Hase Kettwiesel trike | ex-Pashley PDQ SWB
Flux V220 CLWB | Zox20 Lowracer
  #10  
Old September 9th 06, 11:46 PM posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Roger Houston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Questions about recumbent trikes


"Simon Kellett" wrote in message
...
The exception (but it may not be Big in the US) is the Hase Kettwiesel:
a fast, light delta, although it can be a little light at the front !!


{ ... not that there's anything wrong with that ... }


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
which recumbent for back and neck injured riders whm Recumbent Biking 0 May 21st 06 04:28 PM
Michigan Recumbent Rally West This Saturday Wolverbob Recumbent Biking 0 September 10th 04 06:28 PM
Michigan Recumbent Rally West This Saturday Wolverbob Recumbent Biking 1 September 10th 04 03:21 AM
Recumbent trikes for trails also Schlumpf drives? peter Recumbent Biking 7 November 18th 03 12:34 AM
ok, hands up jim beam Techniques 58 September 13th 03 03:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.