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Resistance and freewheeling...



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 1st 05, 01:59 PM
Stu Carter
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Default Resistance and freewheeling...

I have a gut feeling hypothesis as follows:

When attempting tricks involving freewheeling, it is easier to perform
them if there is resistance to the turning of the wheel. This includes BC
wheeling and coasting.

I can see that a wheel with high resistance in the bearings will slow down
quicker, but will it also allow the rider to be less precise in their
fore-aft balance?

When I think about extreme cases of high and low rolling resistance, it
feels that my hypothesis is right, but how much effect would normal levels
of differing resistance have?

I've always ridden (freestyle) with very high tyre pressure, making
rolling and turns easier. However, if I lowered my tyre pressure, would
this introduce rolling resistance and make my coasting attempts more
successful?

Could you get or make especially resistant bearings (ie. smooth but
resistant) for learning these skills, then go up to more free-running ones
once the basic skill has been acquired?


These are all thoughts of the top of my head. I don't know if anyone has
ever actually done any research on the matter.


Discuss...


Stu
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  #2  
Old June 1st 05, 07:26 PM
maestro8
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Stu Carter wrote:
*Could you get or make especially resistant bearings (ie. smooth but
resistant) for learning these skills, then go up to more free-running
ones once the basic skill has been acquired?*


This is an interesting concept but I believe all one needs to do is
select an appropriate grade on which to practice, rather than go through
the trouble of replacing their bearings. A slight uphill would have the
same effect as using "stunted" bearings on flat ground.

As to making the resistant bearings, I found salt water corrosion does a
good number on my skateboard wheel bearings...


Stu Carter wrote:
*:wq*


Did I read that right? Are you using VI to edit your postings?
Helloooo uber-geek! If that's truly the case then I can no longer
call myself a geek. It looks like, yet again, the bar has been raised.


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  #3  
Old June 1st 05, 10:19 PM
Stu Carter
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Default

On Wed, 1 Jun 2005, maestro8 wrote:

Stu Carter wrote:
This is an interesting concept but I believe all one needs to do is
select an appropriate grade on which to practice, rather than go through
the trouble of replacing their bearings.


Ok... a slight uphill gradient prevents forward motion, but doesn't hinder
backward motion - so surely the uni can fly out behind you easier. I can
see that the coast will be shorter and not gain speed (good thing!) as it
would if you were on a slight downhill, but I'm still not sure if it would
make things easier.

It's really not clear in my head... maybe I need to draw myself some
diagrams.


As to making the resistant bearings, I found salt water corrosion does a
good number on my skateboard wheel bearings...


Hehe.



*:wq*


Did I read that right? Are you using VI to edit your postings?
Helloooo uber-geek! If that's truly the case then I can no longer
call myself a geek. It looks like, yet again, the bar has been raised.


I don't use vi to edit posts - just pine.

(Screendump of writing this post he
http://www.pygmygoat.net/temp/r.s.u.jpg )

vi is my editor of choice for programming, web development and so on. I
won't try to convince anyone of its merits - worse than religious
evangelism


Cheers,

Stu
--
:wq
  #4  
Old June 2nd 05, 07:56 AM
Klaas Bil
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Default

On Wed, 1 Jun 2005 13:59:42 +0100, Stu Carter wrote:

When I think about extreme cases of high and low rolling resistance, it
feels that my hypothesis is right, but how much effect would normal levels
of differing resistance have?


If the wheel isn't turning, then I can see that in extreme cases your
hypothesis is right. In that case your wheel is a solid (yet sort of
pivoting around the tyre contact patch) support. The resistance acts
one way or the other, depending on the direction of the force acting
on it.

But if, in spite of the high resistance, the wheel would be constantly
rolling in one direction, I don't think the high resistance would help
you. It would ensure a constant deceleration which you have to
counteract with going downhill (or by losing speed). But other than
that it would not provide any stability because the resistive force is
constant in direction. I think.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict
--
wouldnt you be grumpy if somone just said you had PMS? - jagur

  #6  
Old June 2nd 05, 10:58 AM
wobbling bear
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Stu Carter wrote:
*
vi is my editor of choice for programming, web development and so on.
I
won't try to convince anyone of its merits - worse than religious
evangelism
:wq *



member of the same church since 1984 (but of the ESCZZ chapel )
-used ed beforehand-


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  #7  
Old June 2nd 05, 11:26 AM
mikepenton
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another option would be to over-tighten the bearing holders


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  #8  
Old June 2nd 05, 07:22 PM
johnfoss
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If your amount of rolling resistance is constant, I don't see it
affecting your fore-aft balance. If you have input into it, such as in
gliding, this would of course be entirely different.

Only if you have a way lot of friction would you have something useable
to actually push against. In other words, the resistance of the bearings
gives "push back."

On a big wheeled unicycle, one of the reasons you can ride much farther
without a dismount is because pedal input not only moves the wheel in
the desired direction, the mass of the wheel allows you to push back
against it.

For example. Ride into a corner somewhere, with your pedals level. Now
if you press down on the front pedal, what happens? The cycle will lean
back. You can actually use this force to kind of shoot away from the
wall, if done right.


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"jfoss" at "unicycling.com" -- www.unicycling.com

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  #9  
Old June 3rd 05, 12:39 AM
forrestunifreak
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Default Resistance and freewheeling...


Stu Carter wrote:
*

*:wq*


Did I read that right? Are you using VI to edit your postings?
Helloooo uber-geek! If that's truly the case then I can no

longer
call myself a geek. It looks like, yet again, the bar has been

raised.


I don't use vi to edit posts - just pine.

(Screendump of writing this post he
http://www.pygmygoat.net/temp/r.s.u.jpg )

vi is my editor of choice for programming, web development and so on.
I
won't try to convince anyone of its merits - worse than religious
evangelism


Cheers,

Stu
--
:wq *




Why cant you and others just......register?


--
forrestunifreak - Why change this thing, anyway?

"You do not make the unicycle-the unicycle makes you."

~Y.C. tv

'torkerusa.com' (http://torkerusa.com)

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  #10  
Old June 3rd 05, 03:00 AM
Ken Cline
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Default Resistance and freewheeling...

"forrestunifreak" ist.com writes:

Why cant you and others just......register?


Oh, we can. We most certainly can.

Perhaps you meant to ask a different question.

Ken

P.S. On the subject of geekitude, has anyone else modified their
newsreader to replace tinyurls with the URIs the resolve to?
 




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