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People for (selling) bikes



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 8th 19, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default People for (selling) bikes

It always seemed like People for Bikes was an astroturf organization -
an industry promotion group, rather than an association of actual
bicyclists. PfB lobbies hard for segregation of bicyclists. Why? Because
it thinks that will get tons of people buying bikes.

This press release certainly confirms that it's all about the industry:

https://www.bicycleretailer.com/indu...-organizations

--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #2  
Old April 8th 19, 09:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Chalo
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Default People for (selling) bikes

Selling bikes is pretty much like selling anything else. If you can stimulate demand somehow, you'll sell more stuff and potentially make greater profit-- but without regard to whether there's any value in what you're hyping and selling.

Riding bikes for transportation, however, is an inherently anti-capitalist activity. It reduces spending and consumption while increasing health, contentment, and quality of life. I'm glad it has persisted on its own virtues, because nobody with a profit motive has much to gain from it. Thrifty people who don't have unfillable holes in their souls aren't good business.
  #3  
Old April 8th 19, 09:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Default People for (selling) bikes

On Monday, April 8, 2019 at 1:50:05 PM UTC-7, Chalo wrote:
Selling bikes is pretty much like selling anything else. If you can stimulate demand somehow, you'll sell more stuff and potentially make greater profit-- but without regard to whether there's any value in what you're hyping and selling.

Riding bikes for transportation, however, is an inherently anti-capitalist activity. It reduces spending and consumption while increasing health, contentment, and quality of life. I'm glad it has persisted on its own virtues, because nobody with a profit motive has much to gain from it. Thrifty people who don't have unfillable holes in their souls aren't good business..


It certainly isn't capitalistic to run up debt so high that you cannot pay it. This is why bicycle commuting is so common in Europe and why it is increasing in the US rather faster than anyone thought possible.
  #4  
Old April 8th 19, 10:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default People for (selling) bikes

On 4/8/2019 4:50 PM, Chalo wrote:
Selling bikes is pretty much like selling anything else. If you can stimulate demand somehow, you'll sell more stuff and potentially make greater profit-- but without regard to whether there's any value in what you're hyping and selling.

Riding bikes for transportation, however, is an inherently anti-capitalist activity. It reduces spending and consumption while increasing health, contentment, and quality of life. I'm glad it has persisted on its own virtues, because nobody with a profit motive has much to gain from it. Thrifty people who don't have unfillable holes in their souls aren't good business.


We were talking with one of our best bike friends the other day. She
said "I'm a terrible bike shop customer. I haven't bought a bike since
about 1978." She has a very nice early Trek touring bike, and will
probably ride it forever. I'm not quite as bad, having bought a couple
bikes in 2006. However, I bought those direct from Bike Friday.

But that's the industry's problem. If you get a good bike, it can last
for decades. Hence the churning: You "need" an aluminum frame... no, a
titanium one... no, a carbon fiber one. You "need" more rear cogs. You
"need" fewer chainrings. You "need" electronic shifting. You "need" disc
brakes. You "need" tubeless tires... and so on.

At least, our friend takes hers in for an annual tune up. But even when
her bike needs the rare repair, etc. she tends to bring it to our house,
ever since I fixed a "clunk" the shop mechanic couldn't locate.

The last favor, about a month ago, was related to classic Grab-On foam
handlebar grips, which she still likes. In the process I found her
cables badly needed lubrication so I took care of that, too. But the
shop wasn't the least bit interested in doing the Grab-Ons, and I
understand why. What a wrestling match!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old April 8th 19, 11:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Default People for (selling) bikes

On 4/8/2019 3:50 PM, Chalo wrote:
Selling bikes is pretty much like selling anything else. If you can stimulate demand somehow, you'll sell more stuff and potentially make greater profit-- but without regard to whether there's any value in what you're hyping and selling.

Riding bikes for transportation, however, is an inherently anti-capitalist activity. It reduces spending and consumption while increasing health, contentment, and quality of life. I'm glad it has persisted on its own virtues, because nobody with a profit motive has much to gain from it. Thrifty people who don't have unfillable holes in their souls aren't good business.


+1

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #6  
Old April 9th 19, 03:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 9,477
Default People for (selling) bikes

On 4/8/2019 1:50 PM, Chalo wrote:
Selling bikes is pretty much like selling anything else. If you can stimulate demand somehow, you'll sell more stuff and potentially make greater profit-- but without regard to whether there's any value in what you're hyping and selling.

Riding bikes for transportation, however, is an inherently anti-capitalist activity. It reduces spending and consumption while increasing health, contentment, and quality of life. I'm glad it has persisted on its own virtues, because nobody with a profit motive has much to gain from it. Thrifty people who don't have unfillable holes in their souls aren't good business.


Riding a bicycle may reduce consumption of petroleum fuels, or
electricity, but it increases the consumption of food and beer.


  #7  
Old April 9th 19, 08:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Chalo
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Posts: 5,093
Default People for (selling) bikes

Cycling increases not only the consumption of food and beer, but also the enjoyment thereof!

But when you deeply relish your nourishment, you likely will be attracted to the most nourishing things, rather than the most costly ones.
 




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